Upper School

Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

In our 43rd commencement ceremony, The Seven Hills School graduated 82 seniors on the evening of June 9 in Kalnow Gym. In all of its pomp and beloved tradition, the ceremony began with a processional with Jean Joseph Mouret’s Rondeau. In Seven Hills’ illustrious fashion, the seniors walked under garland arches held by juniors. Senate members and seniors Adam and Quinn Shim, brothers, celebrated their peers and a year of accomplishment, saying it was a class known for its community. Board of Trustee President Beth Schiff told the graduates that the school community has learned from them, and continues to admire their commitment and dedication in and out of the classroom. Head of School Chris Garten congratulated the soon-to-be graduates and thanked Schiff, who completed her term after three years, for her dedication to the school community. Seven Hills City Councilman and Seven Hills alumnus P.G. Sittenfeld ’03 delivered a concise speech tailored to the request of the Class of 2017. Sittenfeld, who had invested in a little prep work months earlier, when he visited the seniors to get to know the class better, said, “You asked that my speech be, ‘nice, not too obvious, practical, and that it compliments the Class of 2017.’” Sittenfeld’s address focused on leadership and challenged the graduates to maintain friendships and take risks. “What will continue to define you all is your sheer willingness to try,” said Sittenfeld. Commencement continued with a special address from parent Amanda Cawdrey followed by Alumni Council President Scott Carroll ’85, who presented the Alumni Association Service Award to Devi Namboodiri for, among many things, her community service project, in which she teaches music to students in underserved areas where fine arts programs have dwindled. In a powerful tribute, Head of School Matt Bolton wrapped up the ceremony as he bade farewell to the class, which was mentioned by several speakers this evening to be known as the “class of community and empathy.” During Bolton’s address, at his side was rising senior Abby Smith, whose Personal Challenge project involved learning American Sign Language. Congratulations to the Class of 2017! Click here for more photos of the commencement ceremony.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Commencement Awards

Nina Fatuzzo

Nina Fatuzzo was awarded The Seven Hills Cup, which is given to the leading scholar in the senior class.

Devi Namboodiri

 Devi Namboodiri was presented the Alumni Association Service Award, which is given to a senior who has an outstanding record of service to home and community.

Calvin Arbenz

Calvin Arbenz received the Florence Fessenden Award, which is given to a senior for outstanding achievement in a certain academic area.

Shelby Davis

 Shelby Davis was presented the Carol Brestel Award. The recipient is selected by vote of the faculty “of a senior who combines enthusiasm and talent and who exhibits leadership in school life.”

Madison Morgan

Madison Morgan received the Ruth Russell Jones Award, which is presented to a senior who exhibited the greatest overall improvement and intellectual growth over a three-year period.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Class Awards Day

Congratulations to all Seven Hills award recipients. The following departmental awards were presented at Awards Day at the Upper School.

Louann Kovach was presented the Miriam Titcomb Award, the highest honor awarded to a junior, for exhibiting excellence in “initiative in some area, originality in some area, love of fellow man, and courage of convictions.”

 Austin Murph was presented the Clement L. Buenger Award on behalf of the Fund for Independent Schools of Cincinnati (FISC).

 Mary Grace Ramsay received the Neil Smith Scholarship, which is presented to a student in grade 9, 10, or 11 who best exemplifies the qualities for which Neil Smith is known. He/she must “meet the world with optimism and good will; expect the best from themselves and others; and exhibit courage, compassion, integrity, and intelligence.”

 Personal Achievement Award – Presented to the students whose contributions have made Seven Hills a better place.

Anika Parameswaran (9)

Stratton Papakirk (10)

Max Routh (11)

Kelen Thalinger (12)

 Greg Kalin received the Sophomore Scholastic Achievement Award. This is awarded to the sophomore who exhibits a scholarly temperament and who has contributed the benefits of learning in a given discipline to the School and/or the wider community. This student exhibits a love of learning and intellectual curiosity, and shares enthusiasm for the discipline with others.

 Gavin Meyer received the Citizenship Award. This is awarded to the student who takes an active role in school and/or community affairs, and who exhibits mature political and global consciousness and a sense of civic responsibility.

 Brett Miller was given the Creativity and Original Thinking Award. This is awarded to the student who is given to independent thinking, and who has displayed an inquisitive and creative habit of mind.

 Robert Hill Guarino was awarded the Community Scholar Award, presented to the student “who has shown exceptional achievement in a given discipline and who has extended that knowledge to benefit the larger community.”

 Department Awards

 Andress Art Award- Kelen Thalinger, Noelle O’Neal, and Colin Shields

 Theater Award – Samantha Eng

 English Award – Natalie Lucas

 Kathy Richardson Award – Maddy Kennebeck

 History Award – Piper Spooner

 Math Award – Daniel Grass

 Biology Award – Tindar Cyr

 Chemistry Award – Curtis Sun

 Physics Award – Jacob Weinstein

 Chinese Award – Tristan Au

 French Award – Annie Jonas

 Latin Award – Devi Namboodiri

 Spanish Award – Sam Chun

 Female Athlete of the Year – Lucy Callard

 Male Athlete of the Year – Chase Gardner and Danny Rogers

 Female Scholar Athlete – Laney Saggar

 Male Scholar Athlete – Jake Moses

 Female Archie Griffin Sportsmanship Award – Annie Varatharajah

 Male Archie Griffin Sportsmanship Award – Trey Kieser

 Senate Award – Harold Boyd, member of the Hillsdale maintenance staff

 Click here to see more photos of Awards Day.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Senior Culminating Experience and Class Day

Seniors ended their last two days at Seven Hills giving back and learning more about what lies ahead during their culminating experience, spearheaded by Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis. On the first day, students heard a TED Talk before heading to the Giving Fields, a local farm in Kentucky that provides fresh produce to Northern Kentucky food banks. After the visit to the Giving Fields, they read notes written by their Lower School selves and in ninth grade, then wrote notes of advice for 2021. The next day, students heard from a panel of alumni from the class of 2014 and decorated their graduation caps. They also wrote letters of thanks and letters for retiring teachers Sarah Roberts and Tom Betts. The day ended with the Class Day Assembly, a celebration of seniors. Head of Upper School Matt Bolton welcomed the class and thanked them for serving as mentors and role models to the younger students. “I’m grateful to all of you for the tone you set this year,” he said. “We’re very proud of you.” The chorus then gave a moving performance of Fleetwood Mac’s Landslide. The students were also presented a flower from their advisors and blankets with the Seven Hills crest from the Parents Association. The ceremony ended with a slideshow and videos of the senior class. Click here to see more photos.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Mu Alpha Theta Inducts New Members

The Seven Hills chapter of Mu Alpha Theta, a national honors organization for mathematics, recently inducted new members. These new members excelled in the mathematics classroom, attended weekly math club meetings, and participated in various on- and off-campus math competitions. New members, inducted May 2017 by co-presidents senior Rae Zhang and junior Michael Barresi, are associate member senior Jack Lane, and full members sophomores Belinda Wang, Neda Tehrani, and Susanna Spooner, and freshmen Andrea Stancescu, May Chen, Hannah Wang, Rohan Patil, and Rajiv Raman.

________________________________________________________________________

Sophomore Recognized by University of Michigan for Genetic Research

Congratulations to sophomore Varshini Odayar, who, along with two other students, won an award on May 27, for her research paper at the 4th Annual High School GIDAS (Genes in Diseases and Symptoms) Research Conference, sponsored by by The University of Michigan WISE (Women in Science and Engineering). Odayar’s research was titled, Downregulation of GTPase activating proteins in the biogenesis of neuritis and maturation of dendritic spines; a significant biomarker in major depressive disorder. In February of 2017, Odayar won first place for her computational biology research advanced section in the Fifth Annual GIDAS Genes and Health Contest.

________________________________________________________________________ 

Upper School Hosts Visitor from Sanksriti School in India

An ongoing partnership between Seven Hills and the Sanskriti School in New Delhi, India continued this year when teacher Roopali Arora visited the Upper School. Middle and Upper School Latin and history teacher Katie Swinford hosted Arora, an economics teacher who is a Google Certified Educator and technology coordinator. Swinford created a schedule for Arora, who was able to visit classes that interested her. “She especially enjoyed seeing the students at work in computer engineering, programming, and economics classes,” Swinford said. “History teacher Dan Polifka even designed a block for his ninth-grade world history class where Roopali taught his students a lesson on Narendra Modi’s recent demonetization in India.” While in the area, Arora was a guest of Middle School art teacher Elissa Donovan, Middle and Upper School French and Spanish teacher Jacky Kalubi, and Upper School French teacher Wynne Curry. In addition to exploring Seven Hills, she also saw some sites in Cincinnati. Arora’s visit is part of an exchange program between Seven Hills and the Sanskriti School. Swinford, as well as Donovan and Kalubi, have all traveled to New Delhi as part of the exchange.

________________________________________________________________________

AP Calculus Class Visits Fifth-graders

This May, Upper School’s AP Calculus BC class shared their math findings and skills with Lotspeich’s fifth-graders. The older students took some time to talk to the younger students about how to approach math, and shared stories of their own successes in and enjoyment of math. The fifth-graders had many stimulating questions for the Upper Schoolers, and a lot of great conversation and idea sharing between the students took place. When the time came to wrap up the activity, neither set of students wanted it to end.

________________________________________________________________________

AP Chemistry Students Conduct Archaeological Experiment

Science teacher Linda Ford recently brought a real world experiment into her classroom. Using pieces of ceramic pottery, AP chemistry students conducted a lipid residue analysis similar to the methods used by archaeologists. “The experiment is a real world example of how archaeologists can benefit from chemical analysis,” Ford said. “The students had to extract oily residues from ceramic sherds (or pottery fragments), take the extracted residue through hydrolysis and transesterification (a type of chemical reaction), and extract a mixture of the methyl esters of the free fatty acids into an organic solvent.” Students took their samples to the chemical instrument lab at the University of Cincinnati to inject them into the sophisticated gas chromatograph. They then analyzed their chromatograms back in Ford’s classroom. Ford learned about the experiment when she attended a biennial chemical education meeting of the American Chemical Society during the summer of 2016. “I had to make major changes to the experimental procedure in order to adapt the experiment to my high school laboratory,” she said. Ford thanks Dr. Pat Slonecker of the University of Cincinnati for his help with the experiment.

________________________________________________________________________

English 12 Student Share Projects Based on Cat’s Cradle

To conclude their reading of Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle, students in Nate Gleiner’s and Mark Beyreis’ English 12 classes completed self-designed projects demonstrating and expanding their understanding of the novel. “They were encouraged to draw on existing skills and to respond both creatively and analytically,” Gleiner said. “The projects, which they presented to their peers, took myriad forms, including Jacob Weinstein’s 3-D models of key symbols within the novel, Kelen Thalinger’s abstract watercolor illustrations, Kendall Weems’ original allegorical play, and Jason Guo’s and Lukas Geiger’s text-based, Java-coded interactive computer game.” Drawing on both her artistic and practical talents, Phoebe Schiff designed and built her own karass, a concept of Vonnegut’s invention to describe the web of connections we create with others throughout our life. In her project reflection, she wrote, “This idea caught my attention because I believe that every person comes into others’ lives for a reason. The text inspired me to look for lessons that made me stronger in all situations.”

________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, May 26, 2017

Upper Students Bring in Dozens of Merit Scholarships

Congratulations, Class of 2017! The Seven Hills Upper School shared an impressive, and growing, list of colleges and universities that have awarded our 82 students about $5 million in merit scholarships. In addition, said college counselor Alex Catalan, six students receive National Merit scholarship awards, three are sponsored by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, one by Macy’s Corporation, one by The University of Chicago, and one by The College of Wooster. “Six National Merit scholarship winners and 11 National Merit Finalists out of a graduating class of 81 represents an extraordinarily large percentage of our class, not only in the context of Cincinnati, but also at the state and national level,” said Catalan. “These results once again represent the remarkable academic talent of Seven Hills students and faculty.” A Seven Hills student was also the recipient of the prestigious Questbridge National College Match Finalist for Yale. “Seven Hills seniors received millions of dollars in merit scholarship awards from nearly 50 colleges, including several full-tuition scholarship offers,” Catalan said. “National Merit scholarships are awarded to fewer than one-half percent of participating students in the National Merit Scholarship Competition.” Click here to view a list of the awarding colleges and universities.

________________________________________________________________________

Tournament of Greatness

What happens when history’s great leaders go tete-a-tete in a battle of wits? The Upper School’s Tournament of Greatness shows how a debate between these historical figures may have gone. After a number of rounds, the debate, which incorporates student research of a key figure in history in a debate setting to determine the greatest leader, comes down to just two leaders. This year freshman Megan McLennan portrayed Qin Shi Huang, the founder of China’s Qin dynasty and sophomore Stratton Papakirk portrayed Giuseppe Mazzini, a journalist, politician, and activist who fought for the unification of Italy. The debate was fiery, with both leaders making excellent points. The audience asked plenty of questions, requiring the debaters to draw from their extensive knowledge. A jury of students eventually ruled Papakirk’s Mazzini the debate’s winner.

________________________________________________________________________

2017 National Spanish Exam Results

Forty-five Seven Hills students recently received their rankings in the 2017 National Spanish Exam results. The exams, taken nationwide by over 150,000 students, serve as “a motivational contest to recognize student achievement in the study of Spanish and to stimulate further interest in the teaching and learning of Spanish,” according to the test’s website. The exams are administered in levels 1-4 and correspond with the Spanish course in which students are currently enrolled.

Bronze Medal

Level 2: junior Christine Cao, junior Xinyi Zi, and freshman Nina Martinez-Diers

Level 3: sophomore Ari Gleich

Level 4: junior Leah Blatt, and seniors Katie Corbett, Trey Kieser, and Esther Kim

Silver Medal

Level 2: freshmen Anika Parameswaran, Ethan Rising, James Sammarco, and Jorge Amadeo

Level 3: sophomores Neda Tehrani and Stratton Papakirk

Level 4: seniors Claire Kite and Jacob Moses, and junior John Stewart

Level 5: seniors Samantha Chun and Nina Fatuzzo

Gold Medal

Level 3: sophomores Felix Karthik, Aryan Katneni, Amisha Mittal, and Varshini Odayar

Level 4: juniors Natalie Choo and Mary Grace Ramsay

________________________________________________________________________

Juniors Inducted into NJCL Latin Honor Society

On Friday, May 12, five students were inducted into the Seven Hills chapter of the National Junior Classical League (NJCL) Latin Honor Society. Congratulations to the following students, all juniors: Ben Agin, Lucy Callard, Charlie Dwight, Carly Jones, and Zoe Parlier.

________________________________________________________________________

New Approach to Summer Reading

The Upper School is starting a new summer reading program, which allows students to select a book that speaks to them and involves Upper School faculty members. Almost all Upper School faculty members chose a book they love and want to share with students. After faculty members ordered their books, they invited students to choose from their teachers’ book list through an organized survey process. The students have been notified of the group they are in. Upper School English teacher Marielle Newton said they will then participate in a book club-style day in the first week back to school, in which all students will meet with the faculty member and other students who read their book and chat about it. Lunch will be provided for the discussion as well. Newton proposed the idea to the English department because she wanted to offer more choice to students and bring back the joy to summer reading.  “We wanted the students to be able to choose a book that intrigued them or discussed a passion of theirs so they could read about it and share that interest with other students and a teacher,” said Newton. “It gives kids the ability to interact with a teacher they may never have or may only know in a math or science classroom, and it gives us, as a faculty, a chance to show how much we all read for pleasure and model that joy of reading to the students.” Newton said the book list offers diversity via authors of color and from diverse ethnic backgrounds, and also through genres, including fiction, nonfiction, young adult books, a graphic novel, books used in college history and science classrooms, and National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winners.

________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, May 11, 2017

Upper School Connects with Shroder High School

Seeing an issue from a different perspective is important in shaping our understanding of others. Upper School students participated in an activity in early May that did just that, visiting Shroder High School to have a frank, open conversation about the documentary 13th with their Shroder peers. A group of Seven Hills students watched the documentary to prepare for their visit to the local high school. 13th, directed by acclaimed director Ava DuVernay, is an in-depth examination of race, the justice system, and mass incarceration in the United States. Seven Hills then went to Shroder to have an open discussion about the issues discussed in the film. Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis, who organized the event, said it was valuable for Seven Hills Upper Schoolers to have a conversation with people who have different experiences. “My sense from students was that they enjoyed it,” Francis said. “The Shroder students and faculty did a great job hosting the event.” In addition to Francis, the event was also organized by Clare Blankemeyer and Shannon Yung, both with the Mayerson Foundation, and Shroder High School teacher Glenda Nix.

________________________________________________________________________

Archaeology Class Simulates Excavation

Students in Marcie Handler’s class really dig archaeology! As part of their culminating project in archaeology class, students completed simulated excavations inside small boxes. Handler filled the boxes with “artifacts” and different types of soils. Students had to uncover the artifacts using proper archaeological techniques they learned throughout the semester. The amateur archaeologists took pictures of the site, drew their artifacts to scale, and recorded their data on a site sheet. “The students will write up a final report on their ‘site’ when they are done, compiling their observations from the excavations and their evidence-based interpretations of what they found,” Handler said.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Pictured above from left are Christopher Nathan, Max Lane, and Max Yuan.

Sophomores Recognized by the American Chemical Society

Sophomores Max Yuan, Max Lane, and Christopher Nathan were recognized by the Cincinnati section of the American Chemical Society for outstanding test scores at a special dinner in late April at Northern Kentucky University. Yuan, Lane, and Nathan took the competitive Oesper Test, which is offered to first-year high school chemistry students, and were among the top five scorers. Yuan came in second place, and Max Lane and Christopher Nathan tied for third place. According to Upper School science teacher Linda Ford, each student received not only a certificate of achievement but also a cash award.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Senior Recognized by American Jewish Committee

For 52 years, American Jewish Committee (AJC) has honored outstanding student volunteers of all faiths who have demonstrated a passion for making the community better with the Simon Lazarus, Jr., Human Relations Award. In late April, award winners were recognized at a ceremony at Rockdale Temple in Amberley Village. Among those recognized was Seven Hills senior Jeremiah Weaver. Weaver, who was named the senior winner of the 2017 Simon Lazarus Award, has overcome a series of challenges to meet his academic goals, while dedicating a notable amount of time to improving the community. His involvement in the Red Cross leadership program, both as a camper and a counselor, has positively affected the lives of children and teens from all over Cincinnati and taught him the value of collective effort. Weaver also worked as a volunteer at a summer camp for individuals with special needs, where he assisted campers with various life skills. His supporter describes him as a wonderful citizen and leader, who is deeply committed to civil rights and social justice and is guided through life by a “flawless moral compass and the courage of his convictions.” Weaver was among one junior winner, four junior finalists, one senior winner, and four senior finalists to be presented with cash prizes and recognition of their volunteer accomplishments. This year, the Lazarus Committee reviewed nominations submitted by 34 high schools across the Cincinnati area. The Simon Lazarus, Jr., Human Relations Awards are named for an accomplished leader of the American Jewish Committee. Lazarus was president of the Cincinnati region from 1951-1953, and a member of the national Board of Governors. He was a distinguished Cincinnati attorney who chaired the Mayor’s Friendly Relations Committee, the forerunner of the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission. Tindar Cyr was also recognized as a finalist for the Simon Lazarus Award given to juniors.

________________________________________________________________________

Junior Creates Awareness Campaign

Junior Maya Gleich knows the importance of the words people choose to use, and she wants to spread her message within the Seven Hills community. Gleich recently started a campaign through the Seven Hills Minds club to address language that does not respect special needs populations. The impetus for the campaign was Gleich’s work at Stepping Stones, an organization that helps people with disabilities find independence. Gleich has volunteered and worked at the organization’s camp for a total of four years. At Stepping Stones, she was taught Person First Language, which puts a person before a disability. For example, you would describe someone as a child with Down syndrome, not a Down syndrome child. “I spread awareness by creating a presentation explaining how to structure sentences in a respectful manner and what terms and phrases are considered appropriate,” Gleich said. “Additionally, I hung up posters around the school about ending the r-word and using appropriate language.” She has been working on the project for about three months. “There was no particular reason as to why I started then,” Gleich said. “However, before then, I would always do my best to remind people the r-word is not ok.”

________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, April 28, 2017

 

Reading The Round House

English 9 students are reading The Round House by Louise Erdrich, a complex mystery novel that centers around the real-life, present-day assaults on Native American women that run rampant in reservations because of the perceived lack of culpability present when a non-Native American commits a crime on sovereign Native American land, such as a reservation. English 9 teacher Tricia Hoar introduced her students to the heavy, delicate topic by breaking up the 300-page novel into discussion points and holding classroom chats about key points in the book. During one of the book discussions, students leaned into their descriptions of the characters, defended points, and brought out subtle symbols that helped them connect to a deeper meaning within certain passages. The students then worked in pairs to expound the key points mentioned in the earlier discussion. Hoar said the students are enjoying unpacking a mystery novel but just as equally interested in reading a National Book Award winner penned by a Native American author.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Liquid Nitrogen Demos

Students in science teachers Jen Torline and Linda Ford’s classes recently participated in a riveting interactive class that involved a number of demonstrations with liquid nitrogen. The students watched a row of inflated balloons shrink to discs in a Dewar flask of the gas, which appeared to re-inflate as they came back to room temperature and the air increased its kinetic energy. Other demonstrations included students, outfitted in appropriate protective gear shattering flower petals dipped in -196 degree Celsius liquid nitrogen. Students also observed a disk cooled down with the liquid nitrogen, which became a superconductor and levitated a centimeter-long cube of neodymium. The finale included an opportunity for students to move frozen Teddy Grahams around in their mouths and exhale the cooled, condensed water vapor, said Torline.

________________________________________________________________________

 

Describing the Future, En Español

Spanish III Honors students are integrating vocabulary, grammar, and writing to craft a presentation on predictions of the future of a number of landmarks and geographic areas. Spanish teacher Teresa Bardon is asking her students to focus on grammar—future and subjunctive with conjunctions of time—as they present descriptions of specific areas at specific times, such as the North and South poles in 2050, Venice in 2065, The Amazon in 2100, and sea life in 2040. “The students are presenting all of this in Spanish,” said Bardon. “They are also explaining what the world has to do in order to prevent any environmentally-damaging things from happening, while using the subjunctive tense with conjunctions of time.” Bardon said the students would also use future tense as they describe what will happen if no one addresses the environmental issues they described earlier.

________________________________________________________________________

Upper School Students Inducted into French, Spanish Honor Societies

On April 21, 20 students were inducted into the Spanish Honor Society and the French Honor Society during a lunchtime ceremony. Congratulations to the following students:

Spanish Honor Society

Seniors Katie Corbett, Rebekah Jonas, Trey Kieser, Esther Kim, Claire Kite, Natalie Lucas, Jake Moes, Adam Shim, and Kendall Weems Juniors; and juniors Natalie Choo and Mary Grace Ramsay

French Honor Society

Seniors Shelby Davis, Grace Greenwald, Emily McLennan, and Wil Morriss; juniors Alex Kreines, Garrett Reich, Max Routh, and Curtis Sun; and sophomore Madeleine Jay

 ________________________________________________________________________

(bottom row) Tindar Cyr, third from the left, and Jeremiah Weaver, fourth from left

Simon Lazarus Award

Congratulations to senior Jeremiah Weaver, winner of the citywide Simon Lazarus Human Relations Award given to seniors and to Tindar Cyr, finalist for the Simon Lazarus Award given to juniors. The American Jewish Committee (AJC) will celebrate the 52nd anniversary of the Lazarus Awards at a ceremony that honors outstanding student volunteers of all faiths who have demonstrated a passion for making our community a better place in which to live with the Simon Lazarus, Jr., Human Relations Award. One junior winner and four junior finalists and one senior winner and four senior finalists will be presented with cash prizes and recognition of their volunteer accomplishments.

 ________________________________________________________________________

Upper School Students Excel on National Latin Exam

Over 150,000 Latin students in middle and high schools across America and in more than 15 foreign countries took the National Latin Exam, which tests knowledge of Latin reading comprehension, grammar, derivatives, and Roman culture and history. The overwhelming majority of Seven Hills Upper School Latin students placed above the national average on every level of the exam. Fifty-eight Seven Hills Latin students took the exam, 50 scored above the national average. Listed below are the individual results, in order of distinction and score.

Ninth-graders – Level II Exam

 Gold Medal, Summa Cum Laude Distinction — Kevin Wang (perfect score!), Matt Wabler, Kyle Plush, Suf Safdar, and Alex Grass

 Silver Medal, Maxima Cum Laude Distinction — Cameron Riley, Annika Alper, and Stephen Walsh

 Magna Cum Laude Distinction — Krish Gupta

 Cum Laude Distinction — Rohan Patil

 10th-graders – Level III Exam

Gold Medal, Summa Cum Laude Distinction — Greg Kalin, Max Lane, and Susanna Spooner

 Silver Medal, Maxima Cum Laude Distinction — Keelan Parlier and Maya Patel

 Magna Cum Laude Distinction — Renee Stieby, Claire Harrison, and Annabel Stanley

 Cum Laude Distinction — Patrick Kilcoyne

 11th-graders – Level IV Poetry Exam

 Gold Medal, Summa Cum Laude Distinction — Charlie Dwight

 Silver Medal, Maxima Cum Laude Distinction — Lucy Callard, Zoe Parlier, and Ben Agin

 Magna Cum Laude Distinction — Carly Jones

 12th-graders – Level V Exam

Magna Cum Laude Distinction — Devi Namboodiri

________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, April 13, 2017

Congratulations to New Members of Cum Laude Society

The Upper School honored its 18 new inductees into the Seven Hills chapter of the Cum Laude Society, a national honor society that recognizes academic excellence, at the Cum Laude Dinner on April 12. New members are juniors: Michael Barresi, Lucy Callard, Natalie Choo, Alex Kreines, Nick Purple, Mary Grace Ramsay, Curtis Sun, and Yuou Wang; and seniors: Calvin Arbenz, Shelby Davis, Shane DiGiovanna, Charlie Goldsmith, Rosie Kilcoyne, Jack Lane, Emily McLennan, Devi Namboodiri, Sam Stevens, and Jacob Weinstein. The event also honored the members who were inducted last year as juniors: Samantha Chun, Nina Fatuzzo, Chase Gardner, Daniel Grass, Esther Kim, Jake Moses, and Piper Spooner. The event’s guest speaker was Seven Hills alumni parent Mike Collette. Head of School Chris Garten said, “Seven Hills is one of fewer than 400 high schools in the country—only 23 in the state of Ohio—who have been granted a Cum Laude Society chapter, an academic honor society modeled on Phi Beta Kappa. Each year we recognize students whose academic performance and habits of mind meet the highest possible standards for scholarship and good character.” Collette asked the inductees to mull a number of bold concepts. Collette, founder and CEO of Patient Point and an Executive in Residence at Cincy Tech, challenged the students to share their unconventional ideas publicly and take ownership of their mistakes. “The world doesn’t just care about what you know. It cares what you can do,” said Collette. “Be willing to take risks and put it out there publicly. Have the courage to convince others to buy into your vision.” As part of the annual Cum Laude Society induction ceremony, it is tradition for faculty members of the Cum Laude Committee to address each new member with remarks compiled from quotes from the students’ teachers. Click here to view photos from the Cum Laude ceremony. Click here to read faculty remarks about each inductee.

 ________________________________________________________________________

American Math Competitions

Congratulations to the 139 Upper School students, who recently participated in a number of American Math Competitions (AMC). Upper School math teacher Anne Ramsay shared the following student achievements and top math scorers in the event:

AMC 10 – Max Yuan, William Hawgood, Belinda Wang, Summer Li

AMC 12 ­­– AMC 12 – Jason Guo, Tindar Cyr, Daniel Grass

Of the AMC students, Guo and Yuan qualified to compete at the next level, which is the American Invitational Mathematics Examination (AIME). “This is a big honor because only 2.5 percent of those taking the AMC 10, and 5 percent of those taking the AMC 12 qualify for the AIME,” said Ramsay. In addition, 11 students competed and placed fifth in the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics (OCTM) among schools of similar size. Ramsay also noted that 10 Middle and 22 Upper School students participated in the University of Cincinnati Math Bowl in early March. Students worked together on sets of problems in a team format. All of our teams earned a “superior” or “excellent” ranking for their work. Ramsay thanked Seven Hills students for all of the spirited interest they show in mathematics every year, and for their efforts to participate in a number of math competitions.

________________________________________________________________________

Seven Hills Academic League Hosts Students v. Faculty Event

Upper School faculty and students competed in a rousing round of the annual academic team’s Faculty v. Student competition in late March. The two teams huddled up and put their minds together to prepare for dozens of questions posed by math and physics teacher Lenore Horner, who coordinated the event and advises the academic team. Among the many questions were, “This writer won a Pulitzer Prize for his epic poem John Brown’s Body. He also wrote the poem American Names, which contains the line Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee,” and “This body part being hit during a reflex test can result in the Babinski sign, which is usually indicated when a portion of this body part known as the hallux points upward.” The lively competition concluded with a faculty win. “I like the event because the faculty and the students have fun,” said Horner. “It’s a bit of a different way for the students and faculty to interact.” Students in the competition also participate in the Cincinnati Academic League (CAL), with matches on Mondays at Cincinnati State University during the winter sports season. Matches require the students to answer a number of tough, curriculum-related questions, ranging from biology and physics to the history of classical music. Seven Hills Upper School has a varsity and a junior varsity CAL team. The JV team this year consists of Michael Barresi, Curtis Sun, Alex Kreines, Christopher Nathan, Maddie Kennebeck, and Nick Purple. The varsity team this year consists of seniors Nina Fatuzzo, Jason Guo, Samantha Eng, and Shane DiGiovanna.

________________________________________________________________________

Personal Challenge

Months, and, in some cases, years of dreams, ideas, mistakes, humor, and determination culminated in a number of defining personal challenge projects in early April. Juniors and seniors lined the hallways, Four Corners, and classrooms of the Upper School to present their products, projects, ventures, and ideas. One student ventured into entrepreneurial pursuits and started a pillow company, another showcased his work as a film director, and another renovated a room from start to finish. One student presented thoughts on a gardening project, and another displayed an intricately designed ice-skating costume. The hallways were buzzing with excitement and pride as faculty and students browsed each station for a true learning experience. The Personal Challenge project is a required experience for every Seven Hills Upper School student. Each Seven Hills student designs an original project that helps define the student’s interests and stretches him or her beyond his or her comfort zone. The first part of Personal Challenge took place last fall.

________________________________________________________________________

Junior Named Member of NCWIT Initiative

The National Center for Women and Information Technology recently welcomed Junior Louann Kovach into the Aspirations in Computing (AiC) Community of technical women. The NCWIT AiC Community is an active and supportive group of more than 9,500 women and is the largest community of its kind in the nation. As a member of AIC, Kovach will have access to tech-related internships and career opportunities, networking and professional meet-ups, and social media groups.

________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, March 17, 2017

Funuary Takes Over Upper School

The month of February turned into Funuary at the Upper School, thanks to the hard work of Student Senate, Spanish teacher Phil Thornberry, and history teacher Dan Polifka. Funuary was a school-wide effort to rally students and faculty to have fun and instill spirit throughout the month. “Funuary is just a way to blow off steam and give students the opportunity to work together,” Thornberry said. During Funuary, students were grouped into neighborhoods, with each neighborhood consisting of four advisories. The neighborhoods were assigned a Disney theme, like Lion King or Frozen, and the groups drew inspiration from the themes during competitions throughout the month. The competitions, which were held at the end of the day during advisory time, included Penny Wars, trivia, hall decorating, and a costume contest. Each event had lots of participation and excitement surrounding it. “We were really pleased with the enthusiasm, participation, and collaboration,” said Polifka. “That was the point and it’s great when it works like that.” Students raised a total of $2,328.45 during the Penny Wars. The money was donated to UpSpring, an organization that serves homeless children and youth. The colorful costume contest had students and teachers alike exercising their creativity, and the Finding Nemo and Toy Story neighborhoods swept several costume categories. The overall champions of Funuary were the Finding Nemo advisory in first place, Toy Story in second, and Pirates of the Caribbean in third. Funuary is just part of a string of Upper School activities planned by Polifka and Thornberry throughout the 2016-17 school year. In fall 2016, they launched Spooktoberfest, a Halloween celebration and costume-themed, end-of-the-day hangout on the quad. They have also been hosting game show competitions. Click here to see photos from Funuary.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Derrick Gay Speaks at Upper School

Upper School students and faculty were treated to a presentation by special guest. Derrick Gay in mid-March. Nate Gleiner, English teacher and coordinator of the Equity & Justice Committee, organized the opportunity. Gay, who holds an Ed.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, is an internationally recognized consultant to educational, artistic, and philanthropic organizations around the world, consulting on diversity, inclusion, and global citizenship. Gay hosted a workshop for 50 students, focusing on leadership. According to Gleiner, he also facilitated activities and conversations to help students learn more about themselves, social constructs, and strategies to support inclusion in our community and the larger world. Later in the day, Gay spoke to all Upper School students, giving an interactive lecture titled, “Will You Be Ready For Success in a 21st Century Global Society?” Gay touched on the importance of diversity, globalization, communicating with respect, identity, and more. As he wrapped up his talk, Gay conducted an interesting exercise, asking students to pair up. One partner would ask, “Who are you?” while the other answered with a fact about him or herself. The powerful exercise allowed students to discover things about themselves and others they may not have known.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Doing Schoolwork Like the Romans

Technology has come a long way since the days of the Roman Empire, but one thing has stayed the same—students using tablets. Katie Swinford’s freshman Latin class created the low-tech version of the modern tablet. Instead of screens and apps, students made tablets out of a frame and wax. Students poured the hot wax into a cardboard frame and let it harden. They then wrote the first seven lines of Vergil’s The Aeneid using a wooden stylus. Swinford said the tablets tied into the students’ recent lesson. “We just finished a unit on Roman education. The tablets are the ancient Roman’s classroom iPad,” Swinford said. “Students would use a stylus to etch their homework into the wax and then simply re-smooth the wax to work on a different problem or subject.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Speakers Aim to Spark “Introspection”

Upper School students are learning about a variety of professions in a new way through the Experiential Learning program, led by director Nick Francis. Francis asked different professionals with an assortment of business backgrounds to speak during Upper School assemblies throughout spring. “The purpose of the speakers is to expose the student body to different professions and careers, and to give them a brief glimpse into the world beyond Seven Hills,” Francis said. “This is part of the ‘Introspection’ phase of the Experiential Learning program.” On Feb. 27, Dave Knox, who launched digital marketing agency Rockfish in 2010, and is cofounder of Brandery, spoke about the changing nature of businesses and startup culture in Cincinnati. Brad Walsh of Procter and Gamble spoke about sustainability in large businesses on March 7, and entrepreneur Ryan Eder will talk about his company, Include Fitness, on April 19. Francis said although the speakers may not appeal to every student, he hopes they will hear from someone who “captures their attention or sparks an interest.” “I think the assemblies can be beneficial because they can increase awareness and stimulate thinking,” Francis said. “The Experiential Learning program trying to get students engaged with the real world and hopefully provide a source of inspiration for some.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Middle School Teacher Visits High School French Class

In Ann Griep’s French 4 class, students study the current events of the francophone world, expanding their knowledge beyond the borders of France. Students study Quebec, West, North, and Central Africa, and the former French Indochina. Middle School French teacher Jacky Kalubi grew up in the Congo, a francophone country, and recently shared her knowledge with Griep’s class as they studied Central Africa, examining the themes of immigration and professional life. “In preparation for Mrs. Kalubi’s visit, students read about the two Congos of central Africa, Congo-Brazzaville and Congo-Kinshasa, as well as about some famous artists from the area,” Griep said. “They also watched a news broadcast about an area of Kinshasa called Place de la Victoire and the economic activity in that area.” She said that Kalubi’s presentation gave students a deeper understanding about the two Congos from a historical, political, social, and cultural standpoint. “Her in-depth knowledge of the area, a part of the world to which I’ve never traveled, gives students the opportunity to hear and see more detailed information than I could ever provide,” Griep said.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Hall of Evolution

How did modern penguins come to be? What about horses? Or any other animal you can think of? Ninth-graders in Bryce Carlson’s honors biology course sought to answer that question during the Hall of Evolution. Students grouped up to study evolution, and, in a culmination of that unit, chose an animal and studied its evolutionary history. Each student group selected a different taxon, or group of animals, and constructed a poster and presentation about its history. They presented their work at lunch and students voted on the best presentations. The Hall of Evolution was both informative and interactive!
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, March 3, 2017

nationalmerit-logo1

Seven Hills Congratulates National Merit Finalists

Ten Seven Hills seniors and one 2016 graduate were named National Merit Finalists in 2017. The National Merit Scholarship Program honors talented U.S. high school students each year for academic excellence. Approximately 1.5 million students from 22,000 high schools across the country enter the program each year. The Seven Hills School congratulates the following National Merit Finalists: Calvin Arbenz, Samantha Chun, Shane DiGiovanna, Nina Fatuzzo, Charles Gardner, Daniel Grass, Jason Guo, Jackson Lane, Emily McLennan, Samuel Stevens, and Matisse Peppet, who graduated in 2016, after her junior year. The National Merit Scholarship Program is an annual academic competition that honors talented U.S. high school students. Historically, more than 90 percent of Seven Hills students who earn National Merit Semifinalist recognition also qualify as Finalists. To be considered for a Merit Scholarship award, Semifinalists must fulfill several requirements to advance to the Finalist level of the competition.

__________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_4590

Upper School Students Help Jumpstart Spring Planting in Lower School

Upper School students and teachers helped prepare new planting boxes for spring. “A strong-armed and joyful crew moved seven cubic yards of soil into the 10 new planting boxes in front of the Lotspeich Science Center on Saturday, Feb. 11,” said science teacher Linda Ford. “The newly enlarged and upgraded area is now ready for early spring planting.” She gave a “big shout out” to engineering teacher and Ford’s husband Doug Ford for leading that phase of the project, and thanked Robert Horne, Seven Hills director of finance and operations, for sharing the cost of the fencing. Ford added there is, “much appreciation for three Upper School students (senior Chase Gardner and sophomores Mike Nordlund and Alex Stevens) who got up early to help and saved the backs of several teachers.” In addition to Linda and Doug Ford, Middle School science teacher Ken Revell, Upper School biology teacher Bridget Ancalmo, and Upper School science teacher Jen Torline helped prepare the boxes. The renovated area will be used for garden-based education in science teacher Natalie Williams’ classes.

__________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0427

Upper School Students, Faculty Discuss Hidden Figures

Many Upper School students and faculty recently attended a screening of the Oscar nominated film, Hidden Figures, hosted by SNAAP (Seven Hills Network of African-American Parents). The movie tells the story of three African-American women and their important work as mathematicians at NASA in the early 1960s. The Upper School hosted a lunchtime discussion of the film on Feb. 27. Students and faculty gathered in study hall to have a rich conversation about the movie. Upper School Head Matt Bolton and math teacher Anne Ramsay facilitated the discussion. The group discussed what they took away from the movie, offered opinions, and drew parallels between the film’s 1960s setting and today. Ramsey, who read the book the movie was based on, offered additional insights into the differences between what’s depicted on screen and real life. She said she was ultimately moved by how resilient the women were in the face of multiple challenges. Thank you to SNAAP for hosting this popular event!

__________________________________________________________________________________

John 1

Junior Travels to Amsterdam

Junior John Stewart traveled to Amsterdam in early February, but he wasn’t taking a vacation. Stewart was at work, manning the booth for his family’s company, Stewart Filmscreen, at the Integrated Systems (ISE) 2017 event in Amsterdam. According to Stewart, the event had over a thousand exhibitors. This was his second time attending ISE, although the company has been going since 2004. “The whole trip was a hands-on learning opportunity for me and I look forward to taking up a larger role in the family business in the future,” Stewart said. “I really appreciated my teachers working with me so I could be a part of this amazing learning experience.” Although Stewart spent most of his visit working, staying at the booth from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day, and even going to business dinners in the evening, he spent a day sightseeing around the city, making stops at the Rijksmuseum and the Anne Frank House. He also attended an industry event at the Van Gogh Museum. “Amsterdam was a gracious host city and I was amazed at how everyone commuted on bikes,” Stewart said. “The museums were truly awe-inspiring, and standing in the Anne Frank house will be something I will never forget.” It was an exciting visit and provided Stewart with real world business experience. Seven Hills benefited from the generosity of Stewart Filmscreen. The company donated a projection screen to the Nellie Leaman Taft Early Childhood Center.

__________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_20170120_1155406

Ninth Graders Tour Ethicon

Ninth graders recently got a closer look at a local business that helps people around the globe. As part of their biology course, all ninth grade students toured Ethicon, a company that designs and manufactures surgical equipment. It is headquartered in Cincinnati and New Jersey, but works around the world. After an introductory presentation on what Ethicon does, students toured the facility and its various departments. They also completed an engineering challenge in groups. Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis said Seven Hills’ connection with Ethicon goes beyond the tour. “This visit was part of a bigger program with Ethicon,” said Francis. “We had five students spend five mornings there last summer, getting a more in-depth look at the company.” Francis said the school plans to repeat the summer program, and hopes to add an internship at Ethicon this summer.

IMG_20170120_1227324

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Feb. 16, 2017

PicShells

2017 Presidential Scholar Candidates

Seven Hills congratulates 2017 Presidential Scholar Candidates Calvin Arbenz, Chase Gardner, Jack Lane, and 2016 graduate Matisse Peppet, who graduated after her junior year. Presidential Scholars are selected on the basis of academic achievement, personal characteristics, leadership, and service activities. The Presidential Scholars Program is one of the nation’s highest honors for high school seniors. “It’s amazing to have even one student nominated for this national award that focuses on outstanding academic achievement and high test scores,” said Seven Hills Assistant Head of School and Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs. “To have four is unprecedented for us, and just speaks to the amazing power of this class!”

__________________________________________________________________________________

scholastic-awards-logo

Scholastic Recognizes Seven Hills Writers, Filmmakers, Visual Artists

In an extraordinary and unprecedented achievement, seven Upper School students have received recognition from the prestigious 2016 Scholastic Writing Awards. The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards are the country’s largest and oldest student writing competition. To put this accolade into perspective, alumni of the highest level of the Scholastic Awards are Truman Capote and Sylvia Plath, and more recently, Stephen King, Myla Goldberg, and Lena Dunham. The competition is divided into regions, and Seven Hills students compete in the Midwest Region, which includes Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Ohio.

Seven Hills students who received recognition in the personal narrative competition are:

Micah Bachrach won a Regional Silver Key for Car Rides to the Field

Sam Stevens won a Regional Silver Key for So Where Are You From?

Grace McVey won a Regional Honorable Mention for Sandbox: My Childhood

In the critical essay competition, the following students received recognition:

Sydney Pelnick won a Regional Silver Key for Feminist and Antifeminist Roles in The Canterbury Tales

Avery Dorsch won a Regional Honorable Mention for Why we NEED to Catch Them All: How Beowulf and Pokémon managed to capture our fascination

In the scriptwriting competition, one student received recognition:

Seth Friedman won a Silver Key for his script All That You Love Will Be Carried Away

In the Scholastic Award category for visual art:

Yuou Wang won a prestigious Regional Gold Key for painting. Regional Gold Key winners automatically go on to compete nationally.

English teacher Mark Beyreis called the recognition a “significant accomplishment.” “It’s wonderful that these students, and others who entered, all had the educational experience of publishing their work. They put it out there for others to judge, and that takes intellectual courage and a belief in the work you’re doing. I’m proud of all students who went through that process,” said Beyreis. “It’s also a testament what we do here at Seven Hills. The students deserve all the credit, but I like to think this good news speaks to the kind of opportunity we give students to develop as thinkers and writers.”

__________________________________________________________________________________

Greg Kalin, Felix Karthik, LouAnn Kovach, and Michael Barresi

Hauck Award Winners

Congratulations to the Upper School student winners of the 2017 Frederick Hauck Scholarship for Commitment and Achievement in the Fields of Mathematics and Science ­– Michael Barresi, Greg Kalin, Felix Karthik, and LouAnn Kovach. The Frederick Hauck Scholarships are made possible through the generosity of the Frederick A. Hauck Foundation. Dr. Hauck was a world-renowned nuclear scientist and philanthropist who established the scholarships at Seven Hills to recognize students who demonstrate outstanding achievement and commitment in math and/or science. Each winning student entering grades nine through 12 will receive a one-year scholarship of $1,000 to be applied to his/her 2017-18 tuition at Seven Hills.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Chinese Exchange

Chinese Exchange Students Visit Seven Hills

Seven Hills Upper School students recently hosted students from Shanghai Southwest Weiyu Middle School in China. The 12 students and their teachers visited from Jan. 22-25, enjoying time with Seven Hills students and their host families, as well as touring Cincinnati. Middle and Upper Chinese teacher Mia Wu said there are many advantages to the cultural exchange. Seven Hills students learned about Chinese society and teenage life, as well as cultural and educational differences between China and the United States. “On one hand, students were able to learn more about the world, especially China, through communicating with these exchange students, since Cincinnati does not have a lot of visitors from Asia,” Wu said. “On the other hand, the American students also get a chance to practice their Chinese in a real-life situation.” The exchange will be reciprocated when Seven Hills visits China in 2018.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Archaeology speaker

Guest Speaker Discusses Mayan Excavation

Archaeology students in Marcie Handler’s class recently learned about an ancient civilization from someone who has hands-on experience. Dr. Sarah Jackson, professor of anthropology at University of Cincinnati, discussed her work as a co-director of an archaeological excavation of a Mayan site in Belize. “She was invited to class to speak with the students about the ins and outs of doing archaeological research and work in the remote jungle of Belize, and to introduce students to the process of deciphering an ancient script,” Handler said. Jackson shared photos from the site and talked about what it’s like to actually work in the jungle, as well as information about Mayan culture. At the end of class, students were given Mayan texts and, with very little information, began to decipher them.

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Feb. 2, 2017

_DSC3216 (1)

Standing on the Principles of Physics

Upper School’s Tim Drew took the strong stance on teaching the laws of physics into his own hands during a recent and rather animated lesson that had the students’ heads—and feet—spinning. It all started when Drew laid a 2-by-12 foot plank on his desk. With a small portion of the plank jutting from the edge of the desk, Drew mounted the desk and stood firmly on the overhang. While a few students gasped, pleading with him to be careful, worried the plank would tip, Drew assured them that the plank—a cantilever—wouldn’t tip, even under his standing weight, because the center of gravity of the board remaining on the desk assured a huge lever arm, not allowing the board to rotate and tip over. Drew’s students took a step further into their physics lesson when they studied rotational force. To demonstrate, Drew spun a bike tire suspended by a piece of twine. When he held the twine, instead of flopping to a horizontal position, the tire continued to spin in a vertical position. Drew invited students to spin the tire and hold it with both hands like a steering wheel, while standing on a movable platform. When the students steered to the right, they began moving in the opposite direction on the disk, even though they were not intentionally moving. The activity was a spectacular demonstration of angular momentum and torque.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Wabler lunch and learn (1)

Getting Acquainted with Books for Lunch Author Thrity Umrigar

English 12 Students are in the middle of a unit developed to acquaint students with Books for Lunch Author Thrity Umrigar, who will visit Seven Hills on Feb. 3. In addition to reading her novel The World We Found, students discussed short stories by Chitra Divakaruni and Jhumpa Lahiri. The goal is to empower students to explore the wonderful subtleties of these texts. They developed their own discussion questions, wrote creatively to imagine additional scenes expanding each work’s themes, and tracked character development through flip charts and Google sheets. The multidisciplinary unit also featured a lunch-and-learn session with history teacher and department chair Brian Wabler, who discussed the post-colonial history of India and Pakistan, providing important context for Umrigar’s novel. English teachers Mark Beyreis and Nate Gleiner developed the unit together. “This unit is a wonderful example of how faculty from different departments, students, and parent volunteers all come together to create a learning experience that outpaces what we might do individually,” Gleiner said. “We are so fortunate here at Seven Hills to have programs like Books for Lunch,” Beyreis added.

__________________________________________________________________________________

_DSC3223

Poetry of the Romanticism Period, En Español

Spanish language teacher Teresa Bardon asked her Spanish V Honors students—most of whom are nearly fluent in Spanish—to stretch beyond even their comfort zones by writing poetry. And not just any poetry—poetry from the Romanticism period, a time between 1800 and 1850 when poets waxed melancholy and dramatic in their descriptions, incorporating nature and imagination in their writings. Bardon’s small class of four read aloud their pieces and critiqued each other’s work, making a point to factor in grammar, word usage, whether the poem was succinct, and whether it truly included the criteria that defined the Romanticism period. Bardon said the additional layer of requirement offered the students who are very accomplished Spanish speakers, an opportunity to dig even deeper into their studies of Spanish grammar and history.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Latin 2

Latin Students Create Quills, Transcribe Fables

Marcie Handler’s Latin III honor students are immersing themselves in an ancient art with the study of medieval manuscripts and fables. Traditionally, the manuscripts were decorated with a variety of illustrations and were called illuminated manuscripts. “Students are translating one of Aesop’s fables into Latin, writing their Latin fable onto a page, and illustrating/illuminating the page with drawings,” Handler said of the unit. The lesson was even more hands-on. Before starting their fable translations, students made quills from Canada goose feathers, and used their newly crafted quills and ink to practice different calligraphy styles, adding an additional layer of culture to the lesson.

Latin 1

__________________________________________________________________________________

XU Certamen

Upper School Team Places in Certamen Competition

A Seven Hills Upper School team competed at a Cincinnati-area Certamen event at Xavier University on Saturday, Jan. 7. The ninth grade team, consisting of Kyle Plush, Matt Wabler, Alex Grass, and Kevin Wang, placed second overall in Level 2 Certamen. Also competing was an eighth grade team, consisting of Alex Frohn, Laxmi Namboodiri, and Reva Namboodiri. The team took third place overall in Level 1 Certamen. Certamen hosts five local Cincinnati competitions throughout the 2016-17 school year. The State Championship will be held Feb. 25 in Columbus.

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Jan. 17, 2017

_DSC3112

Upperclassmen Make the Pitch at Shark Tank-style Event

Upperclassmen at The Seven Hills School recently made the big pitch to local business executives during a presentation styled after hit reality TV show, Shark Tank. The presentations, the culmination of Seven Hills’ new entrepreneurship seminar class, were given to local business executives, including Finit Solutions co-founder Angie Apple; small business owner and real estate professional Jay Ashmore; Steve Boymel, president of Healthcare Management Group; Ami Kulkarni, CEO and Founder of Arkadiance, and CEO of Solica Construction, Inc.; and Mike Venerable, president of CincyTech. All panelists are affiliated with Seven Hills as parents, grandparents, or alumni. Four groups of entrepreneur students presented their ideas—all of them, coincidentally, computer applications. Students who participated in the course are: Tommy Robinson, Adam Shim, and Jeremiah Weaver, for an app called “I.Am.Awake”; Tindar Cyr, Thomas Arya, and Chase Byington, for an app called “Fetch”; Charlie Karamanoukian, Max Routh, and Quinn Hoffman for an app called “Gift Me”; and Ashley Labrie, Anjali Gupta, and Colin Shields for their “Out of this World” app. The professional panel chose the “I.Am.Awake” app as one they considered the most viable option, based on the students’ presentations. The presentations were a culmination of the students’ entrepreneur course, taught by Nick Francis, director of experiential learning, and Seven Hills alumni parent Mike Collette, founder and CEO of Patient Point and executive-in-residence at CincyTech. “More than anything, we wanted to teach them to communicate concisely so they can apply the skills no matter what they end up doing,” said Collette. While the entrepreneur seminar class is new this school year, the Experiential Learning program is three years old, said Francis. “It seemed like the right time to add an actual course to the Experiential Learning program,” said Francis. “These real world experiences in this course are very much in line with what we want to accomplish with the program.”

_DSC3098

__________________________________________________________________________________

_DSC3139

Students Share Innovation, Vision in Personal Challenge Exhibits

One student built a kayak. Another learned Chinese dance choreography. Still others researched her grandmother’s family history, learned to scuba dive, designed a steam-powered spider, and presented observations on molecular biology. Dozens of Seven Hills Upper School students shared thoughtful, provocative, entertaining presentations in mid-January, during the first part of Personal Challenge. This unique, long-term project is a required experience for every Seven Hills Upper School student. Each Seven Hills student designs an original project that helps define their interests and tells the story of their process. The second part of Personal Challenge will take place in the spring.

__________________________________________________________________________________

_DSC3053

Teacher’s Sensitive Approach Enlightens Students’ Comprehension of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain’s 1884 novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn remains on the American Library Association’s Banned Book List because of a racial epithet used 219 times throughout the classic coming-of-age novel. Some educators throughout the country choose to assign the book because they feel the literature conveys messages and imparts nuanced historical knowledge in ways that aren’t accessible in other contexts. Others avoid the book, and still others choose to assign the abridged version of the book, which replaces the derogatory reference. Upper School English teacher Marielle Newton assigned the original text. And, in keeping with Seven Hills’ multifaceted, high-ordered approach to academic concepts, she designed a lesson to express to her students why she would be remiss in not teaching the original Adventures Huckleberry Finn. To start off, Newton wrote down two words that have historically attacked a race of people. One of the words is in Twain’s novel. The other is used similarly in South Africa. When most of the students shared that they didn’t know the meaning of the South African word, Newton used that feeling to express how the first readers of Adventures Huckleberry Finn may have felt about the word used in the book. Although Twain’s original readers knew about the word, and may have used it freely, they were desensitized to the word because they knew it did not apply to them, their families, or their history. The desensitization, said Newton, is what propelled the usage of the word over several decades. No one felt the punch. In her delicate, thoughtful lecture, Newton engaged students in a rich discussion about the use of words, how they tie into people’s histories, and how, after hearing the epithet more than 219 times throughout Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, readers began to react to the word, many, for the first time, because it was used to address a kind, witty, sensitive character with whom they felt a connection. Newton wrapped up her interactive lecture with a compelling statement about why Twain, an abolitionist, decided to use such a word in his book. “He used it so it wouldn’t be ignored,” said Newton. “Ignoring something keeps you from being able to criticize it. Using it provides awareness. It forces you to think about it. Among the many things the students take from this lesson, I am hoping they will understand that facing uncomfortable words allows us to change them and take away their power.”

__________________________________________________________________________________

_DSC3057

AP Calculus, Up Close and Personal

Seven Hills’ math department chair Anna Works-McKinney led her students into the mind of a food can engineer in early January, asking her class to frame their thinking to interpret and answer the questions they are sure to see in their upcoming Advanced Placement exams. Works-McKinney projected the image of a cylindrical shape and discussed with her class the functionality of a number of designs. A soda can, for instance, is slightly taller than a soup can. And the perfectly circular top-to-bottom design of a soup can would pose a nagging problem if used as a mug for drinking. Just how tall is a cat food can? And is it bigger than the average tuna fish can? And, while thinking of all of these things, what do you need to consider if you want to conserve the aluminum being used in a redesign of a can of soda, cat food, or a can of tuna? The everyday considerations set the mental wheels in motion for students, who need to be prepared to write formulas for a number of cylindrical designs. Works-McKinney said her approach allows students to zoom in on a number of ways calculus must be used to solve a problem.

________________________________________________________________________

IMG_0942
Just a few of Seven Hills’ Nov. 2016 Bethany House volunteers

Seven Hills Students, Faculty to Serve at Bethany House

Members of the Seven Hills student and faculty community will prepare and serve breakfast several Saturdays this school year at Bethany House, a facility for homeless and disadvantaged women and children. “This is our ninth consecutive year of reaching out to Bethany House,” said math teacher Anne Ramsay, who organizes the event. Ramsay said the breakfast service includes providing and serving breakfast to about 30 people and playing with the children. The volunteer groups, which began in November last year, will serve every month from January until April.

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Dec. 16, 2016

Science on the Ohio River

Environmental Science on the Ohio River

Upper School students in Linda Ford’s environmental science class spent a day in mid-November examining water quality and ecology at the Thomas More College Biological Station along the bank of the Ohio River. Ford said students glean unique insight from their fieldwork and come away with a more nuanced understanding of the biodiversity within the Ohio River. “We enjoyed the unusually warm day to measure chemical, physical, and biological water quality indicators from small craft,” said Ford. “Dr. Chris Lorenz, who directs the station, was our expert guide.” Students in the class are seniors Rebekah Jonas, Harper Duncan, Piper Spooner, Eliza Clark, Scott Arnold, Jack Lane, and Chase Gardner.

ford1

__________________________________________________________________________________

Rose-Hulman Math Competition

Rose-Hulman Math Competition

Seven Hills participated in the Rose-Hulman math competition in mid-November. Twenty Seven Hills students were among the participants at the competition at Lakota West High School. Recognitions are based on grade and gender, and given to top 10 finishers at each location.

Ninth grade girls

Hannah Wang – 2nd

Andrea Stancescu – 3rd

May Chen – 8th

Ninth grade boys

Rajiv Raman – 1st

Adam Chen – 6th

Rohan Patil – 7th

10th grade girls

Belinda Wang – 6th

10th grade boys

Max Yuan – 2nd

Aryan Katneni – 4th

Christopher Nathan – 6th

11th grade girls

Mary Grace Ramsay – 1st

11th grade boys

Curtis Sun – 6th

Ben Zhong – 7th

Michael Barresi – 8th

12th grade girls

Rae Zhang – 7th

12th grade boys

Jack Lu – 2nd

__________________________________________________________________________________

_dsc2116

Molecular Plant Biology

The Calvin Cycle is sweet—especially when you are wrapping your mind around the process in Brian Berning’s biology class. As a way to bring home the intricacies of the Calvin Cycle, which explains how a plant makes energy and synthesizes sugars in three cycles, Berning asked the students to build models of carbon chains with M&Ms. The students learned that the Calvin Cycle describes how plants make food—sugar, or glucose—from carbon dioxide. Using their knowledge of the cycle, the students arranged the candies in a pattern that illustrates the three, five-carbon chains that form at the end of each of the plants’ three cycles. The straightforward exercise solidified molecular concepts so the students can confidently process more complex chemical cycles and reactions.

__________________________________________________________________________________

9th grade Certamen team

Certamen Teams Place at University of Cincinnati

Congratulations to our ninth grade Certamen team! Upper School Latin teachers Katie Swinford and Marcie Handler said the accomplished students placed third overall in the late October event, which took place at the University of Cincinnati. Congratulations to Alex Grass, Kyle Plush, Matt Wabler, and Kevin Wang!

__________________________________________________________________________________

tanahesi-coates

Upper School Students Attend Xavier University Address by Atlantic Journalist Ta-Nehesi Coates

More than 40 Upper School students and teachers attended an address by writer, journalist, and commentator Ta-Nehesi Coates, in late November. The students joined a sold-out crowd of more than 3,000 attendees at Xavier University to hear Coates’ presentation, On Race in America. A best-selling author and national correspondent for Atlantic, Coates writes about cultural, social, and political issues. English teacher Nate Gleiner said Seven Hills’ English 12 students read Coates’ memoir Between the World and Me, which won the National Book Award in 2015, for their summer reading assignment. Seven Hills was proud to serve as one of the major sponsors of the event. “Mr. Coates spoke on the economic foundations and legacy of racism and inequality in America, and he responded to a number of audience questions focusing on the recent resurgence of hate crimes and police violence in America,” said Gleiner. “Students found his talk moving.” Gleiner added that Upper School students and teachers gathered for a lunch-time discussion, which was moderated by history teacher Dan Polifka and math teacher Anne Ramsay, the week after to discuss what they heard and to share their thoughts and reactions.

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Nov. 22, 2016

_dsc2127Engineering the Design

Using only manila folders, glue, and laminate, juniors and seniors in Doug Ford’s introduction to engineering design class researched, brainstormed, and designed their own chairs. Before building the full-scale chair out of cardboard the students built a scale model of their chair out of manila folders and glue. Students used a drill press, scroll saw, and box cutters to carve the precise shapes used for the construction of their chairs. “Just as we did here, professional engineers research a problem, bring their ideas to the group, share their ideas, and as a group, decide what it should look like; then they build a small model of the chair.” The manila folder models had to hold 120 pounds. The final product must hold 200 pounds and will be evaluated using criteria developed by the class.

 

__________________________________________________________________________________

img_1068Entrepreneur Students Solve Problems for Local Business Owners

A few Cincinnati businesses are better off because their CEOs consulted with Seven Hills’ young entrepreneurs. In a new semester course that focuses on entrepreneurship, 12 upperclassmen met with their clients—business owners who have an interest in growing the reach of their companies—and researched solutions. The students then held a meeting with their client and presented their solutions. The students have presented to Sixteen Bricks Artisan Bakery owner Ryan Morgan and most recently in mid-November, to SkinnyMom.com owner Brooke Griffin, who expressed a need to increase traffic to her website. The students worked in groups of three, under the guidance of their teachers, Nick Francis, director of experiential learning, and Seven Hills alumni parent Mike Collette, founder and CEO of Patient Point and executive-in-residence at CincyTech. Francis said the entrepreneurship class has placed Seven Hills students at the forefront of understanding business consulting and working with clients in real situations. “The students are really engaged. They’ve had real-world connections with local businesses,” said Francis. “This is not hypothetical. These executives have asked them for ideas to address real challenges. And Mike (Collette) has brought a lot of great examples to the students. The material has been relevant in the best way.” Both Morgan and Griffin have shared that the students’ ideas were helpful and helped them to address their business challenges. The students will wrap up their course with Shark Tank-style business pitches to a panel of local entrepreneurs in January.

__________________________________________________________________________________

debate

Debate Club Hosts Post-Election Discussion

Although the election is over, it is still a topic of conversation for many people. The Upper School Debate Club recently hosted a post-election discussion, asking, “What role did the media play or should have played in the election?” The students first broke into groups, then came together for everyone to participate in a larger discussion. Students engaged in civilized conversation, talking about the role of traditional media, as well as Twitter and the internet, throughout the election.

__________________________________________________________________________________

_dsc2147

Delving into Biotechnology

Upper School students recently learned how to conduct the extremely delicate Bradford assay in Brian Berning’s biotechnology class. The assay, which requires students to work with seven cuvettes—rectangular-shaped test tubes—all filled with the Bradford solution and different levels of globulin standards, allowed students to measure the concentration of protein in a solution. The students completed their procedure by using a spectrophotometer, an apparatus for measuring the intensity of light in a part of the spectrum, especially as transmitted or emitted by particular substances.

__________________________________________________________________________________

dsc_0467Measuring Centripetal Force

Students worked together in Lenore Horner’s honors physics class to measure centripetal force. Using a circular motion apparatus, the students measured how much force is needed to pull an object out of the path in which it is moving. “If the object doesn’t get pulled, it will continue in a straight line at constant speed,” said Horner. “The faster you are going, the bigger that pull has to be to change the path of the object. They are measuring how much force is needed to do that.”

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Nov. 11, 2016

 

orig_photo548546_6732838

Breaking down Macbeth

English teacher Mark Beyreis says to really get Shakespeare you have to move around inside the language, but if you’ve ever tried, you know it’s easy to just saw the air too much with your hand. To help students, as Hamlet would say, “beget a temperance that may give it smoothness,” two members of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company conducted a workshop with an English 10 class. Actors Kyle Brumley and Cary Davenport led the group through acting warm ups and a table read before coaching them on how to direct and act out a speech from Macbeth, which the students are reading for class. “Seven Hills already has a very successful eighth grade program with the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, and we wanted to pilot an Upper School program with sophomores,” said Beyreis, who, along with fellow English teacher Marielle Newton, developed the pilot with the company’s education director. The early reviews have been positive, Beyreis said, pointing out that Brumley and Davenport blended together an actor’s approach to the play with literary analysis. Students agree. “I really enjoyed it,” sophomore Avery Dorsch said. “It was really nice to see what they thought about the play.” Fellow sophomore Xeni Drath agreed. “They pointed out a lot of things about the text and put it in a perspective that made you feel comfortable with it.” Click here to view photos from the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company workshop.

__________________________________________________________________________________

keystone-species

Seniors Share Fables with First Graders

First graders recently learned new science fables from some of their older counterparts. Seniors in Linda Ford’s environmental science class visited science teacher Natalie Wiliams’ first graders, to teach them about keystone species. Ford said her students do educational outreach outside of the classroom once a quarter. “I think that the important part of environmental education is this whole idea of educating others on the importance of nature,” she said. Seniors each researched and wrote a fable about a keystone species, or a species so important to other species that its ecosystem would change if it were removed. They discussed the term and meaning of the fable, and shared a slideshow about the species. Williams said the project is a fun way for students to teach other students. “First graders love learning from the Upper schoolers,” she said. “I feel it’s just beneficial all the way around.”

keystone-species-2

__________________________________________________________________________________

orig_photo548559_6732945

Spooktoberfest Brought Students, Faculty Together Outside Classroom

As a way to bring together Upper School students and teachers, in a fun, low-stress environment, teachers Dan Polifka and Philip Thornberry coordinated Spooktoberfest, a costume-themed hangout on the Upper School quad, on Halloween. Polifka said this and other events are important to bolstering community and adding balance to the rigor and academic pressures of the Upper School environment. “Phillip and I, both as the faculty advisors of the Student Senate and just generally as teachers, feel it is important for students to maintain a balance,” said Polifka. “We ask our students to work hard, but we don’t want that to come at the expense of students not enjoying being at school.” This is not the first time the duo have put together an event aimed at just having fun. Polifka and Thornberry have run trivia competitions, and even threw a resale shop Price is Right game for the 10th and 11th graders at different class meetings. “Together, the Student Senate and 7UP, the Upper School’s spirit club, decided to try to make the Halloween annual costume competition a little bigger and more fun. So we called off the usual Monday all-school assembly on Halloween and threw Spooktoberfest instead,” said Polifka. “We had a bunch of carnival-type games, music, and candy, and students were able to spend half an hour milling about outside on the quad, just hanging out and enjoying themselves on a beautiful fall afternoon.” Polifka said the students and teachers enjoyed wearing costumes, including a very special group costume of mostly red shirts with a few yellow and blue shirts mixed in, á la Star Trek. The winner of the students’ best group costume got to pie dean of students and math teacher David Brott in the face! Thornberry said the students truly enjoyed the change of pace. “After consulting with the senators, together we came up with a few carnival-style games such as a mummy wrap competition, a three-legged race, pumpkin rolling, a pin-the-tail-on-the-werewolf game, and bean bag tossing, among others,” said Thornberry. “Halloween music was playing, more kids than ever were in costumes, and the sun was shining, so it was a pretty nice day out on the lawn.” Both Polifka and Thornberry said they hope Spooktoberfest becomes a Seven Hills Upper School tradition.” Although there’s certainly room for improvement and refinement, it’s a pretty good rough draft to work from and will hopefully stick around for the foreseeable future,” said Thornberry. Click here to view more photos from Spooktoberfest.

orig_photo548559_6732956

__________________________________________________________________________________

img_6554

Community Service Day

The Upper School recently participated in Community Service Day, lending a helping hand around Seven Hills and the community. Students participated in a variety of activities, including cleaning up the garden boxes at Lotspeich, removing invasive weed species near the Duck Creek and Red Bank intersection, working in the Doherty Campus gardens, and planting trees. They also volunteered at Matthew 25 Ministries and the Children’s Home, and completed a project for Crayons to Computers. Click here to view more photos from Community Service Day.

__________________________________________________________________________________

constitution-bowl2

Constitution Bowl

As part of an initiative to promote the understanding of the Constitution while allowing students to see their teachers interact in subjects outside their immediate discipline, U.S. history teacher Dan Polifka organized a Constitution Bowl this fall. “As a U.S. history teacher, I want to promote understanding of the Constitution,” said Polifka. “It was a quiz bowl to bring together history, competition, and fun.” Polifka said the four winning students—Jack Lane, Daniel Grass, Charlie Goldsmith, and Devi Namboodiri played against faculty members Matt Bolton, Phil Thornberry, Marielle Newton, Gail Bloom, and Brian Wabler. Polifka thanked the students involved, as well as the faculty, including history teacher Lowell Wenger, who inscribed and signed the pocket Constitutions that were given away as prizes, which were won by the winning student team, who answered correctly – “How many times has the candidate who won the most popular votes for president NOT won the Electoral College (and for a bonus, what years did it happen)?” The students got the question 100 percent correct (four times: 1824, 1876, 1888, 2000). Said Polifka, “It was great to see a whole bunch of students and teachers who were there to watch and, hopefully, learn about the Constitution, while having some fun, too!”

Many thanks to Upper students Maya Gleich and Matthew Wabler for sharing their photography of this event.

constitution-bowl1

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Oct. 31, 2016

commended

National Merit Commended Students Named

The Seven Hills School continues its tradition of excellence with seven seniors, who recently were named Commended Students in the 2017 National Merit Program. The Seven Hills School congratulates the following National Merit Commended Students, seniors Scott Arnold, Chase Byington, Jake Moses, Henry Marquardt, Katie Corbett, Devi Namboodiri, and Andres Antonsson. The National Merit Program also recently released the names of our National Merit Semifinalists, bringing the total number of Commended Scholars and Semifinalists to 21. Our National Commended students qualified for recognition in the National Merit programs with their scores on the PSAT.

__________________________________________________________________________________

dsc_5415

Middle, Upper Latin Students Participate in OJCL Fall Forum

Nine Latin students from Seven Hills attended the Ohio Junior Classical League Fall Forum at Columbus Academy on Oct. 1. Students participated in a day of Latin Club bonding and friendly competition with Latin students from around Ohio. During the course of the day, Middle and Upper School students won ribbons in the Academic Pentathlon, Latin Recitation, Impromptu Art, and Certamen tournament.

Students receiving awards were:

Latin Recitation: Second place freshman Kevin Wang and fifth place freshman Matt Wabler

Impromptu Art, Special Award for Best Myth: Seventh grader Ryan Homer and and eighth grader Aidan Finn

Academic Pentathlon Test Level I: First place eighth grader Aidan Finn and fifth place eighth grader Eli Perlin

Academic Pentathlon Test Level II: Third place freshman Kevin Wang

Academic Pentathlon Test Level IV: Third place junior Charlie Dwight

Several students also competed on Certamen teams. The tournament was an open, which means the students were randomly placed in teams made up of students from other schools at their level.

Novice Certamen: First place eighth grader Laxmi Namboodiri and team, eighth grader Aidan Finn and team, second place eighth grader Reva Namboodiri and team, and third place eighth grader Eli Perlin and team

Intermediate Certamen: First place freshman Kevin Wang and team, and third place freshman Matt Wabler and team

Upper Certamen: First place junior Charlie Dwight and team

Click here to view more photos from the forum.

__________________________________________________________________________________

tweeting

Tweeting the Ohio Secretary of State

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted recently held a Twitter town hall to answer questions about voting in the state. Upper history teacher Jen Faber incorporated the town hall into her lesson, asking 10th graders in her World History class to submit their own questions. Throughout the class, the live Twitter chat was projected onto the board. Faber said she wanted her students to see what could be done on social media during the election. They talked about Husted’s role in the election and the roles of different states. Faber noted this use of Twitter chats is a “totally new” way for election officials to engage voters.

__________________________________________________________________________________

french-students

French Students Visit Seven Hills

French students from Lycée de la Croix Blanche, located in Bondues, France, came to Seven Hills as part of an exchange between the two Upper Schools. French students arrived on Oct. 14 and stayed with their Seven Hills host families until Oct. 25. Students and their teachers, Audrey Brogniart and Helene Losson, spent two days at the Upper School, experiencing the day-to-day life of a Seven Hills student. They also spent the weekends enjoying time with their host families. Throughout the week, while their host students were at school, the visitors went on several trips around Cincinnati, including a trip to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, downtown, University of Cincinnati, and an underground tour. Both Brogniart and Losson commented that the experience was wonderful. “This group is really bonding,” Losson said on their last day in Cincinnati. “[The students] are very sad to leave today.” Students will not have to be apart from each other for too long. As part of the exchange, Seven Hills students will visit their exchange students in France this upcoming March.

__________________________________________________________________________________

doughnuts

Doughnuts and Literature

In Mark Beyreis’ English class, doughnuts and literature go hand-in-hand. Seniors recently read an essay in Calvin Trillin’s American Fried about what the author considers the best restaurant in the world. While they discussed the essay in class, Beyreis provided his students with the self-proclaimed “best doughnuts in Cincinnati,” Holtman’s Donuts. After discussing the essay, students wrote their own personal narratives. “Food is such a great springboard into understanding your life,” Beyreis said. He said students will read a lot of different personal narratives throughout English, and he praised Trillin’s work for its interesting structure and use of simile and metaphor.

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Oct. 13, 2016

chinese-club

Chinese Students Take First Place in Kung Fu Competition

Seven Hills students recently claimed the top prize in the kung fu competition held during Miami University’s Chinese Festival. On Friday, Sept. 16, Upper School students in Mia Wu’s Chinese class attended the festival on the Oxford campus, which hosted schools from around the area. The event opened with a kung fu lesson, immediately followed by a competition to put students’ newly acquired skills to the test. Seven Hills placed first, and the school received $150 to spend on Chinese class. Students were featured on news station WCPO because of their win. They talked to a reporter and were filmed practicing kung fu. Click here to read the story! At the festival, Wu said, students had the opportunity to experience different aspects of Chinese culture. In addition to kung fu, they learned and competed in kite painting, sampled new foods, and visited booths featuring, among other things, Chinese movies and board games. Wu said the event was a way for students to “experience different Chinese cultural perspectives. I think it’s a great opportunity for students to experience Chinese culture. It’s a rare opportunity in this area.”

chinese-club-2

__________________________________________________________________________________

Coffee with a College Counselor

On Sept. 27, Upper School parents took a morning to sit down with the school’s college counselors. Coffee with a College Counselor is an informal session that allows parents to ask their pressing questions and get answers from Seven Hills college counselors. Future sessions will be held from 7:30-8:30 a.m. on Oct. 25, Feb. 27, and May 9. Thank you to the college counseling department counselors Alex Catalan, Beth Driehaus, Lara Magdzinski, and Susan Marrs, Assistant Head of School, Director of College Counseling & Director of Upper/Middle Studies.

__________________________________________________________________________________

horner-physics

Honors Physics Put Paper to the Test

Math and Science teacher Lenore Horner recently tasked her honors physics students with an interesting project—make a standard sheet of paper hold as much mass as possible. Students could only use the paper, and had no assistance from glue, tape, or other office supplies. They tested their work in the classroom by stacking books and weights on their creations. The project is tied to a lesson on forces. “We’re just starting to think about forces applied to something other than rigid points and will later on get to torque and center of mass concepts, which they were applying in loading their projects,” Horner said. Horner said the project helps students establish a sense of scale. She noted they are often surprised by how much weight a piece of paper can support. She added that it is also a good problem-solving task because it’s open-ended. “There are a variety of reasonable approaches and they have to choose one and pursue it,” Horner said. “On the other hand, it’s a small enough project that testing and redesigning can be easily done and the model-test-refine cycle is fundamental to the practice of science.”

__________________________________________________________________________________

world-history-artifacts

Hands-on History

Ninth graders got their hands on history when Katie Swinford, Latin and history teacher, utilized real Bronze Age artifacts to enhance her unit on Ancient Greece in her World History class. The artifacts, including pottery and pieces of weapons, were borrowed from the University of Cincinnati and were found in excavation sites of Troy, Mycenae, and Pylos. While passing the artifacts around the room, Swinford discussed the Trojan War, written about in the epic poem The Iliad by Homer. There is a question among scholars about whether the Trojan War is an actual historical event, and following the presentation, students were required to write an essay arguing whether they believe that the archaeological and textual evidence supports or denies this. The lesson benefits students in another area of study as well. Ninth graders are reading The Odyssey in their English class, and Swinford said the Ancient Greece unit lays the archaeological and historical foundation for the book.

__________________________________________________________________________________

birder-on-the-news

Ninth Grade Birder in the News

Ninth grader Ethan Rising was interviewed on WCPO on Sept. 24 during the news station’s coverage of the Great Outdoor Weekend. Rising is an avid bird watcher and member of the Ohio Young Birder’s Club. Along with his mother, Liz Rising, he attended the annual Big Sit in Milford, where club members count as many birds as they can see and hear. Watch Rising and his mother’s interview here.

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Sept. 22, 2016

dsc_0331

Students Craft Business Proposals in Entrepreneurship Class

Students in Seven Hills’ new semester course entitled, Seminar In Experiential Learning: Entrepreneurship, recently learned how to build a foolproof pitch. The students heard from retired Procter & Gamble executive and Board of Trustee member Stephen Baggott, who took them through the steps to develop a solid business proposal. Throughout the detailed workshop, Baggott discussed a number of principles necessary in a solid business pitch, including but not limited to, the overview, background, recommendation, and suggestions for the proposal. Baggott urged the students to use concise, unambiguous language, and explain quickly and clearly how the product or idea would make financial sense. “After your overview and background presentations, your readers should be nodding,” said Baggott. His sage advice also included, “There are never more than three good reasons to do anything. If you have more than that you are probably including more information than you need.” Baggott explained terms like “gross profit margin” and “conversion” so that the students would feel comfortable using the terminology naturally in their conversations and future work. The students later had an opportunity to craft and present their business proposals to their classmates. The entrepreneurship seminar class is co-taught by Seven Hills Experiential Learning Director Nick Francis, and Seven Hills alumni parent Mike Collette, founder and CEO of Patient Point and an Executive In Residence at CincyTech, a public-private Venture Fund that invests in early stage start-ups in Southern Ohio. The class, which recently formed a partnership with local Sixteen Bricks Artisan Bakehouse owner/baker Ryan Morgan, is also applying their knowledge of business development and strategy to formulate a customer feedback mechanism for Morgan.

__________________________________________________________________________________

2017-national-merit_2

Seniors Qualify as National Merit Semifinalists

The Seven Hills School continues its tradition of excellence with 14 Seven Hills seniors—17 percent of the 2017 senior class—qualifying as Semifinalists in the 2017 National Merit Scholarship Program. National Merit Scholarship Corporation released the names of the Semifinalists on the morning of Sept. 14. The Seven Hills School congratulates the following National Merit Semifinalists: Calvin Arbenz, Samantha Chun, Shane DiGiovanna, Samantha Eng, Nina Fatuzzo, Charles Gardner, Daniel Grass, Jason Guo, Katharine Kilcoyne, Jackson Lane, Kaitlyn Loeffler, Emily McLennan, Matisse Peppet, and Samuel Stevens. Seven Hills 2016 graduate Matisse Peppet, who graduated after her junior year, is also being recognized by the National Merit Scholarship Program as one of the 2017 Semifinalists. The National Merit Scholarship Program is an annual academic competition that honors talented U.S. high school students. Historically, more than 90 percent of Seven Hills students who earn National Merit Semifinalist recognition also qualify as Finalists. To be considered for a Merit Scholarship award, Semifinalists must fulfill several requirements to advance to the Finalist level of the competition. Semifinalists are the highest-scoring program entrants in each state and represent the top one percent of the state’s senior students. Students qualify for recognition in the National Merit programs with their scores on the PSAT/NMSQT.

__________________________________________________________________________________

image2

College Counseling Invites 27 Colleges, Universities for Mock Admissions

More than 200 students and parents attended Seven Hills’ annual “Mock Admissions Committee Workshop” in mid-September. The popular program allowed students and families to step into the shoes of a college admissions officer for the evening as they read, reviewed, and discussed sample applications. Admissions representatives from 27 select colleges and universities across the country were in attendance to guide small group discussions and share insight and expertise. The evening concluded with a mini college fair, during which students and parents were able to ask questions and gather information about the participating colleges. College Counselor Lara Magdzinski said students and parents called the event an illuminating and reassuring experience that gave students a basis to develop further discussions about their college choices. “By participating in this hands-on activity, students and parents are able to better understand the complexities of the admissions decision-making process,” said Magdzinski. “It is our hope that they walked away with a sense that there are a wide variety of factors valued by colleges, that there is no one ‘right’ formula to get in, and that there is a human being on the other side of the process who is taking the time to get to know them and what they bring to the table.”

image5

__________________________________________________________________________________

Upper School Students Share List of Enriching Summer Activities

Upper School students participated in a number of amazing opportunities over the summer. Nick Francis, director of experiential learning, said the summer opportunities are an enlightening experience for the students. “The students are exposed to opportunities that are very real and relevant and are tied to their interests,” said Francis. “These summer experiences can help a student decide if this is an area of interest they want to pursue or if there is a tangential avenue that is appealing.” Click here to view a list of some of our students’ summer 2016 opportunities.

__________________________________________________________________________________

dsc_0274

Upper School Students Mine Interests, Hobbies at Club Fair

With almost 50 clubs from which to choose, Upper School students enjoyed searching and finding their niches at Seven Hills Upper School Club Fair in early September. Hillsdale Commons was abuzz with tables, treats, and displays, as students perused the offerings, which included, Investment Club, a club for China’s oldest board game—Go Club, Rocket Club, and Video Game Creation Club, to name a few. Click here to learn more about the dozens of clubs available to Upper School students.

club-fair

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Sept. 8, 2016

DSC_0079

Thinking Like Ancient Historians

Freshmen history students recently received a glimpse of what historians do when they are researching the past. Wanting his students to better understand the complexity of studying ancient and medieval history, history department chair Brian Wabler asked his students to simulate the process by writing a brief history of the presidential election campaign. They were asked to imagine that they were a historian from hundreds of years in the future who had access to only a few sources. “In order to simulate the paucity of sources that historians of the ancient and medieval world have available to them, I asked the students to base their account on only a few sources that I provide to them,” said Wabler. “As you might imagine, the students who have to base their account on Trump’s Twitter feed, for example, will write a very different account than those who had to base theirs on Clinton’s Twitter feed.” After being assigned a scant number of sources, the students asked and answered questions about the campaign. The students found that many of the questions could not be answered, based on their small number of sources. They also learned that their articles would be slanted in one area or, in some cases, void of accurate information. Wabler said the exercise was a good illustration of how, given access to different sets of evidence, historians reach different conclusions.

__________________________________________________________________________

AP-College-Board-logo

Advanced Placement Scholars

The Seven Hills School congratulates the 73 members of the Classes of 2016 and 2017 who have been named AP Scholars by the College Board for their exceptional achievement on college-level AP (Advanced Placement) exams. Of the 275 Advancement Placement exams in 15 subjects taken by 129 Seven Hills students, as of July 2016, 95 percent of the scores were 3’s or better on the 1-5 national scale, qualifying our students for advanced college standing. AP exams, graded on a scale of 1-5, are administered by the College Board and taken by high school students across the country. Students prepare for the exams with AP courses, which are rigorous, college-level classes in subjects ranging from calculus to foreign language.

Receiving National AP Scholar Awards for average scores of at least 4 or higher on all AP Exams taken and scores of 4 or higher on eight or more are 2016 graduates Tigar Cyr, Alex Jiang, Matthew Marquardt, Bennett Smith, Nicole Tiao, and Kathy Wang. Receiving the AP International Diploma was 2016 graduate Gary Wang. The International Diploma is granted to students who receive scores of 3 or higher on five or more AP exams in three or more subject areas. The globally recognized award is given to students planning to study at a university level outside their native countries.

Receiving AP Scholar with Distinction Awards for average scores of at least 3.5 on all AP exams taken and scores of 3 or higher on five or more are seniors Andres Antonsson, Calvin Arbenz, Chase Byington, Samantha Chun, Nina Fatuzzo, Chase Gardner, Charlie Goldsmith, Daniel Grass, Jason Guo, Rosie Kilcoyne, Jack Lane, and Quinn Shim. 2016 graduates who received AP Scholar with Distinction Awards are Fatima Anwar, Kate Coley, Lauren Collette, Margaret Cox, James Coyle, Tigar Cyr, Audrey Ditty, Cathy Fang, Brian Hills, Ada Huang, Alex Jiang, Matthew Marquardt, Mike Nazzaro, Matisse Peppet, Bennett Smith, Zach Sorscher, Claire Stewart, Nicole Tiao, Kathy Wang, Gary Wang, Camille Williams, Kaylan Young, and L-A Zenezini.

Receiving AP Scholar with Honor Awards for average scores of at least 3.25 on all AP exams taken and scores of 3 or higher on four or more are seniors Elizabeth Bohinski, Joe Dizenhuz, and Barret Gao. Class of 2016 graduates who received AP Scholar with Honor Awards are Alyssa Akiyama, Maria Bobbitt-Chertock, Margaret Briggs, Matthew Clayton, Carly Cohen, Clay Hausberger, Danny Mutasim, Kelly Pan, and Tziporah Serota.

Receiving AP Scholar Awards for scoring 3 or higher on three or more exams are seniors Shelby Davis, Shane DiGiovanna, Samantha Eng, Lukas Geiger, Tim Hagemeister, Trey Kieser, Emily McLennan, Jake Moses, Noelle O’Neal, Laney Saggar, Lauren Saggar, Abby Schneider, Piper Spooner, and Jacob Weinstein. Class of 2016 graduates who received AP Scholar Awards are Catherine Bain, Abby Clark, Jacob Feldman, Claire McDonald, Sawyer Pardo, Mehul Patel, Claire Piorkowski, Kenneth Remaklus, Hayley Samson, Andrei Savu, Jeff Welch, and Matt Williams.

__________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0096

Understanding the Math Concept of Limitations

Math department chair Anna Works-McKinney recently discussed removable discontinuity, jump discontinuity, multiple limits, and a host of mathematical concepts, while working through a number of X-Y graphs with her students. Throughout AP calculus AB class, Works-McKinney used a number of analogies to translate formulas into real life scenarios, sometimes eliciting laughter from her focused students. “Do you ever remember teasing your siblings when you were little by saying, ‘I’m not touching you’ – but you are really close to them – hovering over them? You tell them, ‘I’m not touching you so I won’t get in trouble’ but you might as well be touching them? Well that is how we describe removable discontinuity,” Works-McKinney told her students. “You have an X value and a Y value and they are headed toward each other but they will never touch. If they meet each other you have a limit. But if you don’t, there is no limit.” Works-McKinney told the students that understanding this concept will give them a foundational understanding of calculus. __________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0107

Summer Reading Discussions

Juniors in Marielle Newton’s English class discussed Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms during a group discussion of their assigned summer reading. Newton reviewed the definitions of themes, symbols, motifs, and authorial intent during the discussion, and asked the students to identify examples in the book. The students also discussed the importance of understanding motifs—strong recurring symbols—within the novel, which, in the case of A Farewell to Arms included the character Catherine’s hair, rain, and trying to escape war by using alcohol, to name a few. While the exercise refreshed the students’ command of taking apart the layered meanings of classic literature, the interactive nature of the class also allowed students to refresh their skills to enable them to glean better understanding from the thoughts and ideas from their peers early in the school year, said Newton.

__________________________________________________________________________________

screen-shot-2016-09-07-at-3-04-30-pmNinth Grader Shares Birding Experiences at Conference

Ninth grader Ethan Rising’s passion for bird watching was on display when he was the keynote speaker at the Indiana Young Birders Conference on Aug. 27. Rising spoke about his recent camp experiences, sponsored by the Audubon Society and the American Birding Association, along with a trip through Victor Emanuel Nature Tours. Rising explored his interest in birding earlier this summer when he visited Hog Island, Maine, in June. In Maine, he was able to spend a day at a scientists-only, research island that reintroduces arctic puffins. Rising had the opportunity to meet the ornithologist who developed the project. In July, he spent nearly two weeks in the Chiricahua Mountains, on the Mexico/Arizona border. While in the mountains, he learned about the region’s rich birdlife. In addition to Rising’s speech, the conference featured speakers and activities focusing on the intricacies of bird watching.

__________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, June 6, 2016

DSC_0773

Congratulations Class of 2016

With humor, wit, reflection, pomp, and even a game of charades, families, friends, and faculty bade farewell to the Class of 2016. To the tune of Jean Joseph Mouret’s Rondeau, played by The Northwind Brass Quintet, 85 young men and women proceeded to their seats in Kalnow Gym, under arches of fresh greenery, to take a step into the next chapter of their lives during Seven Hills commencement exercises. The students received a welcome from Student Senate members Lauren Collette and Nicole Tiao, followed by greetings from President of the Board of Trustees Beth Schiff and Head of School Chris Garten. The ceremony also included a musical selection sung by 2016 graduates Maria Bobbitt-Chertock, William Graber, and Kenneth Remaklus, and junior Shelby Davis, directed by fine arts department chair and choral director Tina Kuhlman. Speaking to hundreds of family members and friends, keynote speaker retired Seven Hills Middle School English teacher Linda Maupin held the graduates in rapt attention as she “taught a class” on stage, delivering a riveting lesson reminiscent of what many of the graduates experienced in her eighth grade class years ago. Maupin’s theme—“Be awake to the details” and “Stay alive in the moments”—was not lost on the grads, who responded by answering their former teacher’s pop quizzes and chirping out guesses to Maupin’s literary game of charades. The ceremony concluded with a heartwarming address by 2016 graduate Kenneth Remaklus, who ended with a recitation of the song he sang as a rising sixth grader, Goodbye Lotspeich, in which Remaklus replaced “Lotspeich” with “Seven Hills.” An awards presentation ceremony followed, which included endowed awards, departmental awards, and the Alumni Association Service Award, presented by Alumni Council President Scott Carroll `85 to Michael Heldman. Many thanks to Andi Guess, Kristin Hunnicutt, and the maintenance staff for organizing and setting up the event. Click here to view a photo gallery of the event.

_________________________________________________________________

Commencement Awards

Michael Heldman was presented the Alumni Association Service Award, which is given to a senior who has an outstanding record of service to home and community.

Tigar Cyr received the Florence Fessenden Award, which is given to a senior for outstanding achievement in a certain academic area.

Claire Stewart was presented the Carol Brestel Award. The recipient is selected by vote of the faculty “of a senior who combines enthusiasm and talent and who exhibits leadership in school life.”

Kaitlin Taft received the Ruth Russell Jones Award, which is presented to a senior who have exhibited the greatest overall improvement and intellectual growth over a three-year period.

Alex Jiang, Nicole Tiao, and Kathy Wang were awarded The Seven Hills Cup, which is given to the leading scholars in the senior class.

Click here to view photos of the event.

_________________________________________________________________

Awards

Congratulations to all Seven Hills award recipients. The following departmental awards were presented at Awards Day, held June 2 at Kalnow Gym:

The Ad Summum Cup was awarded to the Class of 2016. The cup is given to the Upper School class with the highest number of students on the honor roll.

Annie Jonas was presented the Miriam Titcomb Award, the highest honor awarded to a junior, for exhibiting excellence in “initiative in some area, originality in some area, love of fellow man, and courage of convictions.”

Allie Allen was presented the Clement L. Buenger Award on behalf of the Fund for Independent Schools of Cincinnati to a senior.

Jake Moses received the Neil Smith Scholarship, which is presented to a student in grade 9, 10, or 11 who best exemplifies the qualities for which Neil Smith is known. The recipient must “meet the world with optimism and good will, expect the best from themselves and others, and exhibit, courage, compassion, integrity, and intelligence.”

Personal Achievement Award – Presented to the students whose contributions have made Seven Hills a better place.

Annabel Stanley (9)

Alexis Tucker (10)

Jeremiah Weaver (11)

Sawyer Pardo (12)

Seth Friedman received the Sophomore Scholastic Achievement Award. This is awarded to the sophomore who exhibits a scholarly temperament and who has contributed to the benefits of learning in a given discipline to the School and/or the wider community. This student exhibits a love of learning and intellectual curiosity, and shares enthusiasm for the discipline with others.

Devi Namboodiri received the Citizenship Award. This is awarded to the student who takes an active role in school and/or community affairs, and who exhibits mature political and global consciousness and a sense of civic responsibility.

Noelle O’Neal was given the Creativity and Original Thinking Award. This is awarded to the student who is given to independent thinking, and who has displayed an inquisitive and creative habit of mind.

Matisse Peppet was awarded the Community Scholar Award, presented to the student “who has shown exceptional achievement in a given discipline and who has extended that knowledge to benefit the larger community.”

Department Awards

Andress Art AwardMichael Chamberlin, Juliana Yip-Ono, Lee Wilger, Abby Clark, and Emma Sacco

Theater AwardKenneth Remaklus

Music Award Ada Huang and Clay Hausberger

English AwardCarly Cohen

Kathy Richardson AwardDrew Vecellio

History AwardAbby Schneider

Math AwardMatthew Marquardt

Biology AwardShane DiGiovanna

Chemistry AwardNina Fatuzzo and Daniel Grass

Physics AwardCathy Fang

Chinese AwardHolly O’Neal

French AwardSydney Lewis

Latin AwardPiper Spooner

Spanish AwardKate Coley

Female Athlete of the YearClaire Stewart

Male Athlete of the YearMatthew Marquardt

Female Scholar AthleteNicole Tiao

Male Scholar AthleteMatthew Marquardt

Female Archie Griffin Sportsmanship AwardMargaret Cox

Male Archie Griffin Sportsmanship AwardCorey Wilson

Senate Award – Chair of World Languages Department and Upper School French Teacher Ann Griep

Click here to view photos of the awards ceremony.

_________________________________________________________________

Magnified Giving

In the fourth quarter, ninth graders continued the Upper School’s relationship with Magnified Giving, a local organization founded by businessman and philanthropist Roger Grein. Now in its ninth year, Magnified Giving works with 65 area high schools, including Seven Hills. Magnified Giving helps support student learning about philanthropic giving. Magnified Giving provides student groups with $1,000 and challenges them to find a local non-profit organization to receive this money. The students research community needs and service providers, invite organizations to apply for their grant money, and ultimately award grant funding to the agency whose needs seem most compelling. This year, after the class narrowed down an applicant pool to semifinalists and then finalists, a small group of ninth grade students and faculty visited three finalist organizations to learn more about their services and how grant money might be awarded. Following a presentation of their peers’ findings, students ultimately voted UpSpring as their grant recipient. UpSpring provides educational opportunities for children experiencing homelessness. “The students who visited the finalists were impressed by the energy, creativity, and commitment of the UpSpring team and delighted to be given the opportunity to help decide how our grant funds for UpSpring would be used,” said Upper School English teacher and ninth grade advisory Meredith Brown. Students will use a combination of the Magnified Giving grant, a matching funds grant, and money they raised through a bake sale to fund a short film project and red carpet premiere event for students in an UpSpring’s summer program.

_________________________________________________________________

Mu Alpha Theta

Congratulations to 15 Seven Hills students inducted into the Seven Hills Chapter of Mu Alpha Theta, a national mathematics honor society, on May 18. These students earned this recognition based on their involvement in Math Club, participation in on- and off-campus math competitions, and a high level of scholarship in their math coursework. The Seven Hills Mu Alpha Theta inductees for 2016 are Eway Cai, Carrie Cheng, Ari Gleich, Greg Kalin, Felix Karthik, Aryan Katneni, Matthew Maring, Amisha Mittal, Christopher Nathan, Varshini Odayar, Nick Purple, Mary Grace Ramsay, Yuou Wang, Max Yuan, and Rae Zhang.

_________________________________________________________________

2016 National Spanish Exam Results

Over 40 Seven Hills students recently received their rankings in the 2016 National Spanish Exam Results. According to its website, the exams “are a motivational contest to recognize student achievement in the study of Spanish and to stimulate further interest in the teaching and learning of Spanish.” Across the country, 160,000 students took the national exam in levels 1-4. Each level corresponds with the Spanish course in which a student is currently enrolled.

Results for the State

Level 4: Samantha Chun placed third in the state.

Level 3: Mary Grace Ramsay placed second in the state.

Natalie Choo placed first as State Champion.

Honorary Scholar Award

Level 1: Zhikai Zhong and Xinyi Zi

Level 2: Yuou Wang, Santiago Garcia, and Luke Keller

Level 3: Ricardo Godoy, Sarah Zhang, and Cathy Fang

Level 4: Jacob Feldman and Chase Byington

Bronze Medal

Level 1: Christine Cao and Ian Venerable

Level 2: Dorothy Callard

Level 3:Caitlin Shaw, Robert Shaffer, Kate Stein, Andrew Miccoli, Leah Blatt, and Micah Cummings

Level 4 : Danny Mutasim

Receiving Silver Medal with a score between the 85th and the 94th percentile:

Level 1: Josh Medlin

Level 2: Madison Peltier, Varshini Odayar, Aryan Katneni, Ari Gleich, and Aishwarya Varma

Level 3: Claire Kite, Andrea Johnston, Mary Ellen Bryans, Esther Kim, and John Stewart

Level 4: Ada Huang and Samantha Eng

Getting a Gold Medal with a score above the 95th percentile:

Level 2: Amisha Mittal and Felix Karthik

Level 3: Jake Moses, Katie Corbett, Natalie Choo and Mary Grace Ramsay

Level 4: Samantha Chun (third in the state) and Nina Fatuzzo

_________________________________________________________________

Updated List of SAT/ACT Scores

Seven Hills is pleased to announce that 26 percent of the senior class received a perfect score on at least one section of the SAT or ACT. Congratulations to:

Seniors

Fatima Anwar – SAT reading

Maria Bobbitt – ACT English and reading

Matthew Clayton – SAT subject test in math 2; ACT reading

Kate Coley – ACT reading and English

James Coyle – SAT subject test in math 2

Tigar Cyr – SAT math and reading; SAT subject tests in math 2 and chemistry

Cathy Fang – SAT subject test in math 2

Brian Hills – ACT science

Ada Huang – ACT reading

Alex Jiang – SAT reading and math, and SAT subject tests in math 2 and chemistry

Matthew Marquardt – SAT subject test in chemistry and ACT science

Kelly Pan – ACT English

Sawyer Pardo – ACT reading

Steven Paul – ACT science

Hayley Samson – ACT reading

Maddie Samson – ACT reading

Bennett Smith – SAT math and reading; and SAT subject tests in chemistry and math 2; and ACT composite scores (English, math, reading)

Zach Sorscher – ACT science

Nicole Tiao – SAT reading and writing, SAT subject test in math 2; ACT English and reading

Kathy Wang – SAT chemistry

Gary Wang – SAT math and SAT subject test in math 2

Jai Williams – ACT reading

Juniors

Andres Antonsson – ACT science

Calvin Arbenz – SAT subject test in math 1

Nina Fatuzzo – ACT composite; ACT English, reading, and science)

Chase Gardner – ACT composite; ACT English and reading

Daniel Grass – SAT subject test in math 2

Jack Lane – ACT composite; ACT English, reading, and science)

Henry Marquardt – ACT English and science

Matisse Peppet – SAT reading and math; SAT subject tests in math 2, physics, and Latin

Jacob Weinstein – ACT English

_________________________________________________________________

Comma 1

Ninth Graders’ Children’s Book Explores Commas

As part of a cross-divisional effort between the Upper School and Lotspeich, the Lower School students learned about comma usage during a recent assembly. Upper School English teacher Meredith Brown’s ninth graders Andrew Brown, Amisha Mittal, and Aryan Katneni presented a children’s book authored by students in Brown’s class, Comma Cal and His Pals, during the Lotspeich mid-May assembly. The book features lessons in comma usage with the help of a giant comma named “Comma Cal.” Brown’s students study grammar all year, and take a closer look at commas in the second semester. Comma rules are important, but can seem “overwhelming” to students, according to Brown. “Having the chance to demonstrate mastery, at least of most of the ‘big rules,’ was meaningful,” she said. “It also got the creative juices flowing and facilitated learning through different modes than grammar study usually does.” Ninth graders wrote out the versions of each comma rule, chose the title and picked where Comma Cal was photographed. “Both the writing and the photographs required that the kids think about their audience, which is a hugely important aspect of writing but one that often doesn’t have a lot of palpable import to kids day-to-day,” Brown said. Brown was thrilled her students could share the book with the younger Lotspeich students. “This book was designed for an elementary audience specifically, so the experience of reading it to that audience and seeing how rapt they were was great and allowed the Upper School students to see that we did pretty well in shaping our work to the audience,” Brown said.

Comma 2

_________________________________________________________________

Culminating Experiece

Seniors End the Year with a Culminating Experience

Seven Hills said goodbye to its seniors with two days of reflecting on the past and looking towards the future. In late May, Upper School seniors participated in the Senior Culminating Experience, which included food, a TED Talk, service activities, a presentation from the University of Cincinnati, an alumni panel from the class of 2015, and more. The festivities kicked off with the Countdown to Graduation Breakfast on Thursday. The Alumni Association hosted the breakfast. Students completed volunteer projects throughout Madisonville later in the day.

Students also crafted bird feeders for their parents in the Donovan Arts Center. They used kits to construct and decorate the feeders. Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis said the day is special for seniors because they can come together one last time before leaving for college. “The whole day is about being together as a group,” Francis said. To celebrate the last day of school, Friday afternoon ended with the Class Day Assembly. After being welcomed by Upper School Head Matt Bolton, senior chorus members performed Rascal Flatts’ My Wish. Students’ advisors presented flowers, and blankets emblazoned with the Seven Hills logo were presented to seniors by the Parents Association. Yearbook staff named a few of the class superlatives before seniors enjoyed a slideshow featuring photos from the past school year.

For more photos of the Seniors’ Culminating Experience, click here.

_________________________________________________________________

Destress 1

Students De-stress with Therapy Dogs, Snacks

Exams can be stressful, but the Seven Hills community worked to keep Upper School students relaxed as they prepared for their final tests before summer break. On May 23, Therapy Pets of Greater Cincinnati brought some hardworking, furry friends to the Middle and Upper School Library to kick off finals week. Dogs of all shapes and sizes were at the event. Students relaxed with dogs like Jake, the 170-pound Newfoundland, and Holly, the Portuguese water dog. After petting puppies, students made their way to the picnic tables to enjoy cookies and lemonade, provided by junior Devi Namboodiri.

Destress 2

_________________________________________________________________

bbq 2

Novel Inspires Class Barbeque

Barbeque and books make for the perfect pair in English teacher Mark Beyreis’ 12th grade class. At the end of the semester, Beyreis threw a barbeque for his students inspired by Calvin Trillin’s 1974 book American Fried. The book chronicles Trillin’s adventures as “a happy eater,” discussing foods that aren’t always considered gourmet. “Earlier in the year, the students read Trillin’s personal narrative in which he extols the virtues of Arthur Bryant’s Barbeque in Kansas City,” Beyreis said. “He concludes that it is ‘the single best restaurant in the world.’” Beyreis provided his hungry students with ribs, chicken, tofu for the vegetarians, and of course, plenty of BBQ sauce. The activity was a delicious hit.

BBQ

_________________________________________________________________

Upper School Students Named Finalists for Lazarus Awards

Two Seven Hills students were named finalists for the American Jewish Committee’s Simon J. Lazarus, Jr., Human Relations Awards, which recognizes outstanding junior and senior volunteers from all faiths. Junior Micah Bachrach and senior Michael Heldman were recognized at a ceremony on May 17. The awards committee reviewed 52 nominations from 35 parochial, private, and public high schools around Cincinnati. For both juniors and seniors, the committee named one winner and four finalists. Both Seven Hills students have helped the community in big ways.

Bachrach was inspired to volunteer by his big sister, who has developmental delays. He started volunteering nine years ago with the Special Olympics, joining the ski team made up of people with disabilities and their partners. He has spoken at two elementary schools about inclusiveness and accepting others. He served as vice president of community service and social action in his youth group. Working in the same role in the Regional Office, Bachrach planned four community service events, raising $2,000 for pediatric cancer in the process. Heldman has volunteered in three areas—at a non-profit organization that serves predominantly undocumented immigrants who have limited access to other social services; as a Certified Junior Pet Handler at a greater Cincinnati area nursing home, where he visited independent living, dementia, physical therapy units, and activity areas with a dog to provide new stimulation to residents; and served as co-leader of the Upper School’s Community Service Club.

_________________________________________________________________

Snaap

Seven Hills Network of African-American Parents Honors Students

Students and families who are members and supporters of The Seven Hills Network of African American Parents (SNAAP) honored Seven Hills students of African-American descent during an annual end-of-year SNAAP banquet on the afternoon of June 5. The Rev. Jerome Weaver, a Seven Hills parent, gave the invocation. Head of School Chris Garten and Head of Upper School Matt Bolton applauded the students and their families for a year of dedication, persistence, and purpose. Retired Procter & Gamble engineer and CEO of the Bearden Group, LLC, Pervis Bearden, Sr., delivered an inspiring address, congratulating the students for their achievements and asking them to reflect upon the hard work of their families who have supported them along the way. “Your families have allowed you to bend but not break, to stumble but not fall,” said Bearden. “Your families have empowered you with a great source of inspiration and instilled in you that not having is no excuse for not getting.” The banquet also included a libation memorial ceremony, an African tradition, which was officiated by the Rev. Weaver. The ceremony concluded with remarks from Seven Hills 2016 graduates Nia Page and Brandi Bryson, as well as Seven Hills alumni Lauren Weems ’15 and Joshua Weaver ’15. Many thanks to parents Chantal Weaver, Leslie Bryson, and Erica Vaughn, and several other parents on the SNAAP committee for organizing the event. We also thank community members Felicia Maupin, of Felicia’s Events and Designs, and Monique Colbert, of Pounds of Faith, who provided decorations and desserts, respectively, as well as Millie’s Place Restaurant, and Muzic Company. Click here to view a photo gallery of the event.

The SNAAP honorees for 2015-16 school year are as follows:

Class of 2016

Allie Allen

Brandi Bryson

Hasani Harrigan

Nia Page

Jai Williams

_________________________________________________________________

Thank you!

Thank you to everyone who has made a gift to the Seven Hills Annual Fund for 2015-16. And for those who wish to do so, there is still time to give. We have $125,000 left to meet our goal. Your gift allows The Seven Hills School to maintain the highest quality educational experience possible for all of our students, in each division. The Seven Hills Annual Fund offers the opportunity to make a tax-deductible gift in any amount. Every gift truly makes a difference. For questions, contact Margo Kirstein, Director of Development, at 513-728-2437 or via email at margo.kirstein@7hills.org

_________________________________________________________________

Junior Interviewed on NPR

One Upper School student’s talent has earned him an interview on the radio this month. Tenth grader Curtis Sun will be interviewed on NPR as a finalist in the Morning Edition contest. Musicians were asked to submit a remix of the theme music for the popular program, Morning Edition. After submitting his track, Sun was selected as a finalist. Congratulations Curtis!

_________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, May 13, 2016

DSC_0938Observing the Anatomy of Poetry

In observance of National Poetry Month, throughout the month of April, English department chair and teacher Tricia Hoar required her AP English Literature and Composition students to open class with one of their favorite poems. The students introduced their poems to the class by reading them, discussing the poem’s structure, unpacking the meaning of poetic devices, and sharing their thoughts on the tone of the piece. Senior Anna Davis presented her thoughts with the class on Midsummer, Tobago, by Caribbean poet and playwright Derek Walcott, sharing that she appreciated the structure and rhythms she heard in the poetry, comparing it to the ebb and flow of waves. Davis also shared that she enjoyed Walcott’s simplicity, void of “grand descriptors.” Davis pointed out, and her classmates agreed, that the poem’s “pleasant, delightful tone of a slow, beautiful summer day” also contrasts with the ending’s longing —“days I have lost, days that outgrow, like daughters, my harbouring arms.” Hoar capped the students’ discussion with a short lesson on using precise terminology when analyzing poetry, including the accurate definition for couplets and examples of anaphora.

_________________________________________________________________

IMG_1508Two Seniors Receive Exemplary Awards of Distinction

Alex Jiang was recently named a National Merit Scholarship winner. Jiang will receive a $2,500 Scholarship from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Additionally, Tigar Cyr was recently named a Presidential Scholar semifinalist. Cyr is one of 23 students in Ohio—and one of two in Cincinnati— to receive the recognition. He is the first Seven Hills student, in at least the past 10 years, to be named a Presidential Scholar Semifinalist, which is selected by the U.S. Department of Education’s Commission on U.S. Presidential Scholars.

_________________________________________________________________

IMG_2390Cross-Divisional Lesson in Nature

In a cross-divisional, student-led lesson, Upper School students in Linda Ford’s environmental science class shared their knowledge of capturing nature in photography with fifth graders in Lotspeich science teacher Natalie Williams’ class. After studying notable nature photography, the older and younger students discussed the significance of the pieces to human understanding and appreciation of nature. The student pairs then headed outside with iPads to capture their own photos. With Williams’ help, the fifth graders composed a PowerPoint presentation that was shown during the visit of nature photographer and author David Fitzsimmons.

IMG_2377

_________________________________________________________________

DSC_0064-300x165Science Teacher to be Honored at Northwestern Commencement

Northwestern University will honor Seven Hills chemistry and environmental science teacher Linda Ford as one of five high school teachers who have “lit a spark” in the lives of a Northwestern graduates. Ford, who will receive a special award during an honors ceremony and commencement on June 16 and 17, is one of the recipients of the sixth annual Northwestern University Distinguished Secondary Teacher Awards. The awards honor high school teachers who have touched the lives of Northwestern students and carry a gift of $2,500 for each teacher and each of their schools. Ford said she is grateful for the people who have recognized her for this high honor, including Seven Hills graduate and soon-to-be Northwestern graduate Katie Cirulli ’12. “I appreciate Katie, who took the time to nominate me,” said Ford. “Katie and I will spend some very nice time together during her commencement exercises on June 16 and 17.” Ford also thanked Northwestern University for the beautiful award and said, “Lastly, but very importantly, a heartfelt thank you to my teaching community at Seven Hills, who continue to support my classroom efforts and inspire me with their own powerful dedication to the craft of teaching.”

_________________________________________________________________

IMG_0743Students Participate in University of Cincinnati’s Research Week

As part of the exploration phase of the Experiential Learning program directed by Nick Francis, five sophomores and juniors participated in UC’s Research Week. During the tour, the students, who volunteered to participate, visited research labs in psychology and biology, as well as the university’s robotics program. Francis said the students also had a chance to view poster displays of undergraduate and graduate research projects. The Experiential Learning program incorporates four components, the first three of which have their own sets of activities and objectives. They are: “Core Curriculum,” “Introspection,” and “Exploration.” For students who elect to pursue the program through to graduation, the program may? culminate in acquiring a “Concentration” in one of several focus areas. To find out more about the Experiential Learning program, click here.

 

_________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, April 14, 2016

DSC_0926

Cum Laude

Sixteen juniors and seniors were recently inducted at the 42nd annual ceremony of The Seven Hills School Chapter of the Cum Laude Society. Juniors who were inducted include: Samantha Chun, Nina Fatuzzo, Chase Gardner, Daniel Grass, Esther Kim, Jake Moses, Matisse Peppet, and Piper Spooner. Seniors who were inducted include: Lauren Collette, Tigar Cyr, Audrey Ditty, Cathy Fang, Tziporah Serota, Bennett Smith, Camille Williams, and Kaylan Young. Cum Laude keynote speaker, Seven Hills alumna, Brooke Richart ’04, who is also a Middle School teacher at Seven Hills, shared her work as a teacher in Honduras and with Breakthrough International, a non-profit program that seeks to prepare underserved middle school students for academic success in high school and college. Richart encouraged the inductees to use their talents to help others, and shared that life is a meandering path that may take them in directions they never imagined. In the tradition of Cum Laude at Seven Hills, teachers on the Cum Laude committee read comments about the inductees during the reception. Click here to read comments about our 2016 inductees.

_________________________________________________________________

 

UXgiax27LcMY2K7yZT-HIRH3bimfv_5kQqwvZL_hXvEUsing Design Thinking to Address Social Issues

A group of English 12 students recently took on the daunting challenge of how, in just two weeks, to come up with a prototype for making the world more inclusive and more respectful of differences. Students worked on the project as part of a unit on Art Spiegelman’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus, a graphic novel about the horrors of the Jewish Holocaust. “At the heart of design thinking is the notion that the designer’s toolbox can help find solutions to any problem – even those problems far beyond what we traditionally think of as a design project,” said Upper School English teacher Mark Beyreis. “The students conducted interviews to empathize with their ‘customers.’ Then they defined the problem and brainstormed solutions before creating prototypes. Said one senior of the project, “As we prepare to leave high school and enter the next stage of our lives, it’s important to understand that just because there isn’t an obvious solution, doesn’t mean we cannot find one.” Upper School dean of students David Brott said a project of this type is as much about mastering the process along the way as it is about perfecting the product at the end. “The students picked some tough issues we all face, such as race relations and class disparity,” said Brott. “It was great to see them work together and attempt to find small ways to address big challenges.” The project was a pilot in one section of the English 12 class taught by Beyreis and Upper School English teacher Nate Gleiner, who worked with Karen Glum, science department chair and director of the Innovation Lab.

________________________________________________________________

Spanish Honor Society

Congratulations to the following students, who were recently named to the Spanish Honor Society: Marney Briggs, Chase Byington, Samantha Chun, Anna Davis, Samantha Eng, Nina Fatuzzo, Jacob Feldman, Michael Heldman, Ada Huang, Henry Marquardt, Danny Mutasim, and Claire Piorkowski.

_________________________________________________________________

French Honor Society

Congratulations to the following students, who were recently named to the French Honor Society: Andres Antonsson, Brooke Bailey, Elizabeth Bohinski, Michael Chamberlin, Matthew Clayton, Carly Cohen, Charlie Goldsmith, Annie Jonas, Rosie Kilcoyne, Palmer Kruzner, Sydney Lewis, Claire McDonald, Catherine Shanahan, and Gary Wang.

_________________________________________________________________

American Math Competition Results:

Several Upper School students recently participated in American Math Competitions (AMC). Upper School math teacher Anne Ramsay shared the following student achievements and top math scorers in the event:

AMC 10 – Jonathan Harsh, Michael Barresi, Max Yuan, Ben Zhong

AMC 12 ­­– Tigar Cyr, Matisse Peppet, Rae Zhang, Alex Jiang, Daniel Grass. Of these students, Matisse Peppet and Tigar Cyr qualified to compete at the next level, which is the American Invitational Mathematics Examination (AIME). Within the category of high schools the size of Seven Hills Upper School, Seven Hills placed second in the state in the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics tournament (OCTM), with 20 students competing. From this competition, three students—Rae Zhang, Matisse Peppet, and Alex Jiang—qualified to participate in the state level competition, the Ohio High School Mathematics Invitational Olympiad (OHMIO).

_______________________________________________________________

DSC_0852Seven Hills College Counselor Named to State Board

Lara Magdzinski, one of four college counselors at Seven Hills, was recently elected to serve a one-year term as Secretary and member of the Executive Board of the Ohio Association of College Admissions Counseling (OACAC). The statewide organization, which is comprised of more than 1,000 college counselors and admissions professionals, provides professional development opportunities while working to advance initiatives pertaining to the college counseling and admissions field. Magdzinski said, “While I have been involved in OACAC for years in different capacities—including serving on various committees—I’m excited and honored to become involved in this leadership role. It is a wonderful organization and I am looking forward to helping it carry out its goals for the future and representing our state on the national level.”

_________________________________________________________________

DSC_0857Cross-Divisional Student-led Presentation on Social Media

Equipped with information recently gleaned from their digital citizenship unit, students in ninth grade advisories presented their findings to fifth graders on the Doherty and Hillsdale campuses. The students shared a number of points on the safety and appropriate use of the Internet and social media. The ninth graders, who were invited by school counselors Judy Arnold and Mitzie Moser, shared their insights and experiences with the fifth graders with information ranging from the importance of time management when using social media, to using common sense. The ninth graders offered smart advice that encouraged students to think before they post, post only pictures and information they “wouldn’t mind their grandparents reading,” and only interact with close friends on social media. Ninth grade advisory leader and Upper School English teacher Meredith Brown said the ninth graders, who have already met with Middle School students, will meet with them for a second time this spring to answer questions and share suggestions and experiences.

_________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, March 17, 2016

Imported FilePythagorean Theorem

Students put a visual spin on the Pythagorean Theorem during a recent lesson in Upper School math teachers Anne Ramsay and Cassie Levesque’s ninth and tenth grade geometry classes. The students are currently studying right triangle concepts including the Pythagorean Theorem, dissection proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem, 30-60-90 and 45-45-90 special right triangles, and trigonometry, said Ramsay. “Often right triangle trigonometry word problems include the concepts of ‘angle of elevation’ and ‘angle of depression,’” said Ramsay. “As a brief activity to demonstrate understanding of these concepts, students used their iPads to take photographs and to annotate the photos using the Notability app.” The students pictured in the above photo are ninth graders Jonas Keller and Stratton Papakirk. Ramsay said the photo and editing work was done by 10th grader Avni Varshneya.

_________________________________________________________________

y3eP2YmytQkih-XJ4e883aYj0sIFFfiroQFC57goOXU,O1ddNsMqSwisgb64R3W-E7DmEQ0D5ttfNVCu7f-SehcSocial Media and Digital Citizenship

Ninth graders have been exploring issues related to social media and how they conduct and portray themselves on social media outlets, otherwise known as digital citizenship. College counselors Lara Magdzinski and Alex Catalan shared their experiences as college admissions officers, and how social media is viewed by college admission officers. “Our social media and digital citizenship unit has been structured as a series of conversations with students about the value and the perils of the online world,” said English teacher and lead ninth grade advisor Meredith Brown. “Our advisory sessions have featured a combination of discussion, video clips, and articles. In early March, the ninth grade heard a presentation by Stephen Smith, director of relationship marketing with Cincinnati Bell, who, along with a representative of the Hamilton County Prosecutor’s office, delivered a presentation on responsible and informed technology use in an increasingly ‘wired’ world.”

_________________________________________________________________

SJj2arvdIzh9nV4XPLLHGub_E268zpK8bR4y0a3ZMM4,WKN1zt3HltRN8HSXXtLVYVQ3fVuXq9LEFLWr9h5-Djg (1)Interdisciplinary Discussion Focuses on Building More Inclusive Communities

In an interdisciplinary project between the English and history departments, Upper School history teacher Dan Polifika led a discussion of Native American political history with English 9 students during a brown bag lunch session this week. “A partnership between the history and English departments, the session with Mr. Polifka gave students reading Native American writer Louise Erdrich’s novel The Round House a useful, historical perspective,” said English teacher Mark Beyreis. “This is one of a number of partnerships between the two departments throughout the year.” As part of the discussion, students focused on how, for 100 years, the U.S. government managed Native American tribes through a series of treaties, negotiating separately with each tribe. They also discussed America’s post-Civil War effort to destroy Native American culture by forcing Native Americans onto small plots of private property and taking children from their families to be educated at Indian boarding schools, an act termed “cultural genocide.” Polifka concluded, saying Native Americans are now in the midst of a period of self-determination and an effort to reclaim a heritage that has been under attack—directly, through policy, and indirectly through stereotyping. Said Polifka, “Although widely seen as an improvement from earlier government policy, the long shadows of hundreds of years of a colonial relationship still impact Native Americans’ quest for equal rights.”

_________________________________________________________________

IMG_3028Precalculus, in Spanish

Throughout the first two weeks of March, a group of Seven Hills Spanish students hosted a group of students from Getafe, Spain, as part of the 2016 Spanish Exchange Program. After finding out one of the faculty members from Spain was a math teacher, Spanish III Honors students jumped at the opportunity to participate in a math lesson—in Spanish. “This was not only the immersion and mixing of languages but also of disciplines,” said Upper School Spanish teacher Teresa Bardon. Oscar Vargas Fernández, a math professor in Spain, taught the students a Precalculus class in Spanish. Bardon said the students were enthralled during class time, taking notes, asking questions, answering questions, all in Spanish. “It was wonderful to see how these Spanish learners could use their language skills to learn so much more,” said Bardon. “As with each exchange, the goal is for, not only the exchange participants, but also for Seven Hills students to experience the language and culture immersion that each country offers. It was a wonderful way to see all of the language studies come to fruition when the students were going beyond learning the language to apply it for something else.”

_________________________________________________________________

Upper School Academic Team

Seven Hills student varsity participants in the Cincinnati Academic League recently won the Cincinnati State Tournament to advance to regionals, with a record season of nine wins and 0 losses. The junior varsity team also had a strong season, with a record of eight wins and one loss, said team advisor and Upper School math and physics teacher Lenore Horner. The Cincinnati Academic League is a trivial pursuit-style competition with an academic focus. Horner said the matches consisted of several rounds, including a team round, which included categories such as American l literature, math, world history, fine arts, life science, world literature, American government, world geography, physical science, and U.S. history. Students on the varsity team are Fatima Anwar, Matthew Clayton, Alex Jiang, and Kathy Wang. Junior varsity participants are Michael Barresi, Shane DiGiovanna, Samantha Eng, Nina Fatuzzo, Jason Guo, Varshini Odayar, and Curtis Sun.

_________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Feb. 25, 2016

iT2Kr8Y2h8mWLHhoUmeRcGteFUFTU0UbBAg4wLGRNro,-32aQhv0nB568YmhVvf5BWXxYq5VzopAcIg4edpBqRciShakespeare

Teams of English 9 students are scouting locations on campus, drawing stick figure storyboards, and performing lines in front of a green screen as they film scenes from William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing with their iPads. Each production team, consisting of three to five students, chooses a scene to film – a battle of wits, a dramatic charge of betrayal, a comic scene with crazy malapropisms, a challenge to a duel, or a romantic declaration of love. Next, they analyze the scene. Do Dogberry’s men get that he barely has wit enough to keep himself warm? Do Benedick and Beatrice, tricked into a relationship, actually love one another? Then, they must work together to get that interpretation on the screen. “They’re wrestling with the age old question of how to bring a play to life. But I love that they are also dealing with a very 21st century question, too. How do we use technology to share ideas with others?” said English 9 teacher Mark Beyreis. The unique curriculum extends beyond English 9, with several Seven Hills film buffs contributing their time and energy. Beyreis said Upper School theater teacher Stephanie Park is leading the freshmen teams through an acting unit in the DAC as well. “Sophomore Seth Friedman, a veteran of the project last year and a filmmaker in his own right, has prepared a Khan Academy-style video to help this year’s crews use the green screen editing feature on iMovie,” said Beyreis.

_________________________________________________________________

DSC_0104Studying French-speaking Countries of Africa

As part of the sophisticated approach for which Seven Hills’ world language curriculum is known, Ann Griep’s French IV students are learning specifically about French-speaking areas in Africa. The richness of the lesson was brought to life in a multifaceted lesson presented by Middle School French and Spanish teacher Jacky Kalubi. Kalubi gave a lesson on the two Congos—The Republic of the Congo, also called Congo-Brazzaville, and The Democratic Republic of the Congo, also called Congo-Kinshasa (where she is from)—two French speaking nations in central Africa. “This is one of the many French speaking areas we study in French IV,” said Griep. Kalubi discussed their colonial past, the current political situation in both nations, the economic realities they both face, and the many commonalities between the two countries, as well as examples of friendly rivalries in the areas of sports, fashion and music. Griep and her students were also treated to a popular doughnut-like street food in Congo—homemade “beignets.”

DSC_0109

_________________________________________________________________

IMG_5299Flame Tests in Chemistry

Upper School students recently fired up Bunsen burners and readied their lab journals to conduct flame tests to study the emission spectra of metallic ions in Jen Torline’s chemistry class. “They tested ionic salts in the Bunsen burner flame to observe the different colors that metallic ions produce,” said Torline. “This lab is helpful in illustrating the many ways chemistry is used to detect seemingly hidden elements, such as is the case in forensic science and investigational purposes.”

_________________________________________________________________

IMG_1442Hauck Award Winners

Congratulations to the Upper School student winners of the 2016 Frederick Hauck Scholarship for Commitment and Achievement in the Fields of Mathematics and Science ­– Daniel Grass, Nina Fatuzzo, Matthew Maring, and Varshini Odayar. The Frederick Hauck Scholarships are made possible through the generosity of the Frederick A. Hauck Foundation. Dr. Hauck was a world-renowned nuclear scientist and philanthropist who established the scholarships at Seven Hills to recognize students who demonstrate outstanding achievement and commitment in math and/or science. Each winning student entering grades nine through 12 will receive a one-year scholarship of $1,000 to be applied to his/her 2016-2017 tuition at Seven Hills.

_________________________________________________________________

Excellent Performance at Certamen

Seven Hills recently hosted its fifth annual Certamen in February. Thirteen schools participated, including McAuley, Mariemont, Walnut Hills, Ursuline, Summit, Indian Hill, Turpin, Sycamore, Royalmont, St. Xavier, Covington Latin, Moeller, and Seven Hills. Seven Hills’ Level 2 ninth grade team, including Max Lane, Greg Kalin, and Renee Stieby, placed first out of nine teams. The Upper Level team of students in 10th through 12th grade, including Charlie Dwight, Jack Lane, Devi Namboodiri, and Daniel Grass, placed first out of 14 teams. Said Upper School Latin teacher Brian Sebastian and Certamen advisor, “It was a great success in terms of the performance of our own teams and the number of schools and students in attendance.”

_______________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Feb. 4, 2016

Tigar Cyr
Tigar Cyr

Seven Hills Congratulates Three 2016 Presidential Scholar Candidates

Seniors Tigar Cyr, Alex Jiang, and Bennett Smith are candidates for the 2016 Presidential Scholars Program, one of the nation’s highest honors for graduating high school seniors. Presidential Scholars are selected on the basis of academic achievement, personal characteristics, leadership, and service activities.

Alex Jiang
Alex Jiang
Bennett Smith
Bennett Smith

___________________________________________________________________

DSC_0195 (1)Latin IV-Honors Students Discover Lucretius

Students in Brian Sebastian’s Latin IV-honors class have been sight-reading together from the transformative work De Rerum Natura (“On the Nature of Reality”) by the Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius since the beginning of the second quarter. To learn about the poem’s rediscovery in the 15th century and illuminate its influence on thinkers ever since, students have simultaneously read and discussed the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen Greenblatt. Sebastian said discussion topics have ranged from why some texts have survived the centuries and others have not, to the potential and limitation of reason in discerning the nature of reality in the physical, moral, and metaphysical realms.

___________________________________________________________________

act-sat

26 Percent of Senior Class Earns Perfect SAT/ACT Scores

Seven Hills is pleased to announce that 26 percent of the senior class received a perfect score on at least one section of the SAT or ACT.

Congratulations to:

Seniors

Fatima Anwar – SAT reading

Maria Bobbitt – ACT English and reading

Matthew Clayton – SAT subject test in math 2; ACT reading

Kate Coley – ACT reading and English

James Coyle – SAT subject test in math 2

Tigar Cyr – SAT math and reading; SAT subject tests in math 2 and chemistry

Cathy Fang – SAT subject test in math 2

Brian Hills – ACT science

Ada Huang – ACT reading

Alex Jiang – SAT reading and math, and SAT subject tests in math 2 and chemistry

Matthew Marquardt – SAT subject test in chemistry and ACT science

Kelly Pan – ACT English

Sawyer Pardo – ACT reading

Steven Paul – ACT science

Hayley Samson – ACT reading

Maddie Samson – ACT reading

Bennett Smith – SAT math and reading; and SAT subject tests in chemistry and math 2; and ACT composite scores (English, math, reading)

Zach Sorscher – ACT science

Nicole Tiao – SAT reading and writing, SAT subject test in math 2; ACT English and reading

Kathy Wang – SAT chemistry

Gary Wang – SAT math and SAT subject test in math 2

Jai Williams – ACT reading

Juniors

Andres Antonsson – ACT science

Calvin Arbenz – SAT subject test in math 1

Nina Fatuzzo – ACT composite; ACT English, reading, and science)

Daniel Grass – SAT subject test in math 2

Jack Lane – ACT composite; ACT English, reading, and science)

Henry Marquardt – ACT English and science

Matisse Peppet – SAT reading and math; SAT subject tests in math 2, physics, and Latin

Jacob Weinstein – ACT English

___________________________________________________________________

Senior, Junior Earn Perfect Composite ACT Scores

Congratulations to Juniors Nina Fatuzzo and Jack Lane for receiving perfect composite ACT scores. Both Nina and Jack earned perfect composite scores of 36 on their English, reading, and science tests.

___________________________________________________________________

grapesofwrathA Closer Look at Steinbeck

AP English Literature students worked in groups to study the work of Steinbeck’s during an in-depth unit on The Grapes of Wrath in January. Upper School English teacher Tricia Hoar said the students were responsible for reading the chapters closely, noting how Steinbeck’s language and narrative devices inform meaning. Students looked at the intercalary chapters (broad view of issues) in conjunction with the chapters about the Joad family (focused view of issues) to better understand the economic, social, political issues related to the great migration west in 1930s America. “They have discussed the push Oklahomans, Texans, Arkansans, etc. felt to move west, the mythology of the American dream, the complex relationships between migrant workers, small farmers, land corporations, the Farmers’ Association, and more,” said Hoar. “The students also discussed the significance of Steinbeck’s allusions, figurative language, and style.” Hoar said the students selected passages from the chapters to unpack more closely with their classmates. “Most importantly, there’s a light in their eyes and surprised recognition on their faces when the students realize so much of what Steinbeck had to say in The Grapes of Wrath remains relevant today,” said Hoar. “Those moments are priceless.”

___________________________________________________________________

DSC_0348Magnified Giving

As a part of the new ninth grade advisory program’s community service curriculum, this semester the ninth graders are continuing the Upper School’s relationship with Magnified Giving. Magnified Giving is a local organization founded by businessman and philanthropist Roger Grein. Now in its eighth year, Magnified Giving works with 65 area high schools, including Seven Hills. Magnified Giving helps support student learning about philanthropy and philanthropic giving. Magnified Giving provides student groups with $1,000 and challenges them to find a local non-profit organization to receive this money. The students research community needs and service providers, invite organizations to apply for their grant money, and ultimately award their grant funding to the agency whose needs seem most compelling. Amid their efforts to research local agencies and narrow the focus of their grant, the ninth graders recently enjoyed a visit from Roger Grein himself, who shared his remarkable life story and his passion for philanthropy. Upper School English teacher and ninth grade advisory Meredith Brown said, “Mr. Grein’s inspiring spirit is at the heart of the Magnified Giving mission, and the ninth graders were excited to learn more about his life and the history of his organization.” Brown and Upper School associate librarian Gail Bloom are coordinators for the initiative.

DSC_0351___________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Jan. 14, 2016

Students Conduct Biofuel Enzyme Assays

Students in Brian Berning’s biotechnology class recently conducted assays—quantitative and qualitative analyses of a metal ore—to determine its components. Using a dropper and several test tubes the students concluded a number of things, including the initial rate of a reaction with and without an enzyme, performed serial dilution, and determined experimental values using a standard curve, and used a spectrophotometer, which measures the intensity of light, said Berning. Berning said this assay, or test, is a pertinent topic with the international research scientists right now, as the international alternative fuel community is currently searching for effective cellulose (fungal- or bacteria-based) enzymes to make ethanol production economically and technically viable.

___________________________________________________________________

images93 Percent Already Accepted to Colleges!

To date, the Class of 2016 has filed 814 applications to 241 colleges. Many of these applications won’t be resolved until spring, but of the students who applied Early Action, Early Decision or rolling admissions, 93% have already been accepted to one or more colleges. According to the college counseling department, our seniors have been accepted to Case Western, University of Chicago, UC, Cornell, DePaul, Indiana, University of Michigan, Miami, Northeastern, Ohio State, Pitt, Purdue, Savannah College of Art & Design, Tufts, Tulane, and more. The list of acceptances includes, among others, acceptances to Barnard, Beloit, Carleton, Carnegie Mellon, Elon, Fordham, Kalamazoo, Kenyon, Middlebury, Penn, Princeton, Sarah Lawrence, and Vanderbilt. Click here to view the 2015-16 college profile, a document that accompanies every Seven Hills student’s college application.

___________________________________________________________________

DSC_0215Character Sketching Based on The Canterbury Tales

In English 10 Honors, students embarked on their own “pilgrimage” to Canterbury by assuming the identities of one of the pilgrims Geoffrey Chaucer describes in the General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. Bolstered by secondary source research, students crafted a character sketch of their pilgrims’ physical and behavioral characteristics, delivering them to their classmates in the voice, and often in the dress, of a member of medieval society. “Through these presentations, students gained further insight into the ways in which Chaucer satirically undermines many of the institutions of the Middle Ages,” said English teacher Nate Gleiner.

___________________________________________________________________

MHeldmanSenior’s Essay Receives Nod from Renowned Author

After writing an essay inspired by the writings of famed author/journalist Richard Rodriguez, senior Michael Heldman received recognition that many writers would love, but few receive; a complimentary email from Rodriguez himself. Heldman, who wrote about his trip to Israel, referenced Rodriguez as much of the inspiration for his piece, an assignment for English teacher Mark Beyreis. Upon reading Heldman’s piece, Beyreis encouraged Heldman to share it with Rodriguez. To his surprise, Heldman received this prompt response from Mr. Rodriguez:

Dear Michael Heldman,

Thank you for sending along your piece on your visit to Israel.

I wish I could claim more of an influence over your writing, but I sense that you already have the writer’s gift within you, particularly in your sense of detail—the British accent, the bolted chair, etc. Good writing is always the result of keen observation—the eye first finding something the writer’s words can later consider.

I wish you every success with your writing—and with your ability to see so clearly the world around us.

Best wishes,

Richard Rodriguez

Michael said he greatly values the note from Rodriguez. “I truly feel honored that Mr. Richard Rodriguez was able to read and give feedback on my personal narrative,” said Heldman. “Richard Rodriguez is an inspirational, talented, and ambitious author. He has challenged my peers and me to think critically, while keeping an open outlook to societal ways. He greatly influenced me in writing my personal narrative, and he will continue to have a substantial impact on my writing and perspective of the world for the rest of my life.”

___________________________________________________________________

IMG_4916-1

Civil Rights Activist Visits Upper School

Senior English students in Mark Beyreis and Nate Gleiner’s classes heard from longtime Civil Rights activist Rev. Patricia Brown in late December. Brown shared stories of her life’s work for social justice. Rev. Brown helped desegregate a school and participated in several sit-ins. Rev. Brown, an influential figure in the social justice movement for years, is also the mother-in-law of Upper English teacher Meredith Brown and grandmother of Lotspeich students Max and Vivian Brown. Rev. Brown’s presentation was part of Beyreis and Gleiner’s units on social justice and Frederick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself. Gleiner designed this unique course with a Seven Hills summer curriculum grant, which supports faculty development and innovative, new curriculum.

___________________________________________________________________

alexandra_fuller

Books for Lunch – airing on WVXU

Seven Hills parents and Books for Lunch co-chairs Colleen Dwight and Victoria Karamanoukian were interviewed on WVXU’s Around Cincinnati segment, which aired the evening of Jan. 10. Dwight and Karamanoukian shared information about the upcoming visit from South African author Alexandra Fuller, whose latest work, Leaving Before The Rains Come, is due out in paperback this month. Fuller’s latest book is also on Amazon’s list of The 100 Best Books for 2015. Click here to listen to the WVXU podcast. http://wvxu.org/…/seven-hills-school-welcomes-author-alexan… Fuller will visit Seven Hills on Feb. 5,and later at Xavier University’s Cintas Center for a luncheon. Seven Hills families recently received mailed invitations to the luncheon. Please RSVP or reserve online, at www.7hills.org/booksforlunch. Twenty percent of the cover price will be donated to Books for Lunch if Fuller’s books are purchased at Books for Lunch sponsor, The Bookshelf, in Madeira.

___________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Dec. 18, 2015

2015-12-04 13.55.51Anatomy & Physiology Class Visits New Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Anatomy and physiology students had the opportunity to learn about and tour the nearly completed Proton Therapy Center at the Liberty Campus of Cincinnati’s Children Hospital. This facility, opening in 2016, will be one of only two such centers in the nation owned by a children’s hospital. Abe Gordon, a Seven Hills parent and lawyer who is a lead at the new facility, kindly arranged the tour for the class. He, along with medical physicist Dr. Anthony Mascia, taught the students the benefits of proton radiation therapy over the more traditional photon radiation therapy for fighting cancer, said anatomy and physiology teacher Bridget Ancalmo. They also gave the students a behind the scenes tour, allowing the students the opportunity to see the proton accelerator, the transport system for moving the protons from the accelerator to the patient without touching any surface, and the equipment for administrating the proton beam into the patient. The students also received an insight into how multiple careers come together to make such a project happen. “The students met engineers and a variety of other people working to finish this incredible project,” said director of experiential learning Nick Francis. “This was an amazing opportunity for the students. We are very grateful to Mr. Gordon for inviting us.”

___________________________________________________________________

DSC_0812Blankets for the Homeless

As a part of the Upper School’s new ninth grade advisory curriculum, the ninth grade completed a month-long service project making fleece blankets for people who are homeless. The idea for the project grew out of a Personal Challenge Project completed by sophomore Maya Gleich when she was a ninth grader last year. “For her project, Maya raised money to purchase fleece and then organized volunteers and invested significant hours in making nearly 30 blankets that were distributed through the Homeless Coalition of Cincinnati,” said English teacher and lead advisor for ninth grade Meredith Brown. “This year, in collaboration with Maya, the ninth grade advisory program developed Maya’s project into a class-wide endeavor.” The Upper School purchased enough fleece for the ninth grade class to create 80 fleece blankets and, in advisories and class meetings, the students and advisors cut, tied blanket fringes, wrapped blankets in ribbons, prepared boxes to package, and delivered the finished blankets. The blankets were scheduled to be delivered mid-December, to the Homeless Coalition and distributed through outreach workers for PATH (Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness). Brown said the hands-on collaborative project is just one way the ninth grade advisory program has been working to help show the ninth graders the widely varying community service needs and opportunities in the Cincinnati area.

__________________________________________________________________

First Place in Certamen

Upper School Latin students placed in a Certamen meet at Summit in December.

Certamen results:

Intermediate Level (grade 9): Greg Kalin and Renee Stieby, as well as students from Mariemont—finished in first place.

__________________________________________________________________

DSC_0006Therapy Dogs Offered Finals-Weary Students “Paws” in Their Day

A visit from Therapy Pets of Greater Cincinnati offered Upper School students a moment to take a break from the stress of finals week and relax with a furry friend in the Young Family Library. Several students stopped in the library for a few minutes in the mid-December afternoon. Many of the students remembered their friends by name because the therapy dogs and their handlers visited Seven Hills for the first time last year. “Preparing for and taking semester exams can be stressful, which is the reason we try to bring therapy dogs in for the students during each exam period,” said dean of students David Brott. “Students enjoy meeting the trained dogs in the library after an exam to pet them, hug them, and generally depressurize.”

___________________________________________________________________

RaoStudent’s Submission Gets Nod from Khan Academy

A Seven Hills senior who submitted her instructional video on life science to a competition run by leading online tutorial hub Khan Academy, received a glowing review. Anatomy & physiology teacher Bridget Ancalmo said Mekhala Rao entered the Khan Academy video challenge last fall. “They responded that Mekhala’s video was chosen as one of the best to be shared in the category of Life Science,” said Ancalmo. “She did a really impressive job.”

___________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Dec. 3, 2015

DSC_0675Preview Day

For two days, 80 Seven Hills eighth graders learned the ropes, wended through the hallways of the Upper School, and attended classes with their ninth grade buddies for the Upper School’s annual Preview Days, which took place on Nov. 19 and 20. The soon-to-be-freshmen learned quite a bit about the culture and rhythm of the Upper School, which increased their comfort levels as they prepare to take the next step next year. The two days were also very important for the ninth graders, who were able to share their new experiences in the Upper School with their younger peers. “Everyone in the upper school looks forward to hosting our visiting eighth graders during Move Up Day,” said Head of Upper School Matt Bolton. “The ninth-grade hosts—who were in the eighth graders’ shoes last year and who once may have looked at the upper school with some degree of trepidation—are now totally at home here and are excited to share their experiences with younger students. By spending a day attending classes and other special events, the eighth-graders gained a firsthand knowledge of the academic program and social life of the Upper School. It’s an exciting and informative experience for the eighth-graders, who come away from their visit with a much clearer understanding of how great it is to be a Seven Hills Upper School student.”

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

image1-2Unpacking Frederick Douglass’ Slavery Debate

English 12 students recently worked in small groups to study the debate over the rationale for slavery, as it was presented in the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself. The project, designed by English teacher Nate Gleiner and taught by Gleiner and English teacher Mark Beyreis, asked students to first analyze historical, primary sources advocating slavery, including pre-Civil War essays, letters, pamphlets, and court documents written by pro-slavery politicians, legal experts, scientists, and clergy. The students then read Douglass’ narrative, focusing on how Douglass deconstructs the rationale for slavery. “The students carefully unpacked the language in the Douglass memoir and analyzed how he undermined those pro-slavery arguments in order to win the upper hand in the national debate over slavery,” said Beyreis. Gleiner designed the unique course with a Seven Hills summer curriculum grant, which supports faculty development and innovative, new curriculum.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Students Shine in Rose Hulman Competition

Seven Hills participated in the Rose Hulman math competition in mid-November. The test was given all over the Midwest at different locations. Twenty-two Seven Hills students were among the 202 participants. Recognitions are based on grade and gender, given to top 10 finishers at each location.

 

9th grade boys

Max Yuan – 3rd

Felix Karthik – 4th

Christopher Nathan – 7th

 

9th grade girls

Ewai Cay – 1st

Ari Gleich – 4th

Amisha Mittal – 6th

 

10th grade girls

Mary Grace Ramsay – 2nd

Yuou Wang – 6th

Carrie Cheng – 7th

 

11th grade girls

Rae Zhang – 1st

Devi Namboordiri – 6th

 

12th grade boys

Tigar Cyr – 1st

Alex Jiang – 9th

Andrei Savu – 10th

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tigar-- Honda-OSU Math Medal 009Senior Receives Honda-OSU Math Medal Award

Tigar Cyr was selected to receive the Honda-OSU Partnership Math Medal Award for the Class of 2016 from Seven Hills. Tigar was selected based on his academic performance in mathematics through his junior year. Tigar was recognized along with other area winners at a special breakfast ceremony this fall at GE Aviation in Cincinnati with a pewter math medal, a $100 gift certificate, and the opportunity to apply for a $3,000 scholarship at the Ohio State University College of Engineering.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Shannon Curry
Shannon Curry

Upper School Speaker Series

The Upper School student and faculty community heard from two professionals with extraordinary bodies of work, during the speaker series coordinated by experiential learning director Nick Francis. In mid-November Shannon Curry, daughter of Upper School French teacher Wynne Curry, discussed her work as postdoctoral fellow at UC Berkeley in the Space Sciences Laboratory, where she is researching planetary physics. Shannon Curry received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan studying high altitude atmospheric escape from Mars. Previous to graduate school, Curry worked at Lockheed Martin and the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Tufts University with a concentration in astrophysics and a minor in art history. In late November, students heard from Seven Hills alumnus Sam James ’05, who discussed his work at Harper’s Magazine and teaching a course at Tufts called “Intro to Narrative and Documentary Practice.” James has worked on stories in the Niger Delta region, covering everything from wolf hybrids and army vets, to palliative care and pain relief in Kenya.

Sam James
Sam James

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Nov. 19, 2015

DSC_0546Personal Challenge

Upper School students shared their learning experiences with the school community on Nov. 9 and 10. Their work is the culmination of the research, exploration, and commitment needed to produce their final product, which was showcased during the Personal Challenge event. The projects ranged from building a simulated engine to directing and producing a play on a dime, to the sport of orienteering in Scotland. The Personal Challenge project is a required experience for every Seven Hills Upper School student. Each Seven Hills student designs an original project that helps define the students’ interests and stretches them beyond their comfort zones. The second part of Personal Challenge will take place in the spring.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0237

Keystone Species

In a uniquely collaborative lesson, Linda Ford’s Upper School environmental science students paired up with Natalie Williams’ fourth grade science students for presentations of original fables about keystone species. The pairing was a blend of academics and storytelling that both groups thoroughly enjoyed. The environmental science students wrote fables about keystone species and read the stories to the fourth-graders. The students are familiar with keystone species — animals that have disproportionate affects on the environment — because they have studied it in science class with Mrs. Williams.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Seven Hills “Big Readers” Makes the News

Seven Hills’ two-year-old cross-divisional reading program, Big Readers, is featured in this month’s School Library Connection (SLC), a trade publication for researchers, educators, and librarians. Big Readers, a weekly program designed and launched by Middle and Upper School associate librarian Gail Bloom, brings a group of Upper School volunteer readers together with emerging readers in pre-kindergarten. Bloom said the younger and older Seven Hills students enjoy reading together as they pore over pages of books such as Pete the Cat, Where the Wild Things Are, and Madeline. Bloom authored the article in SLC, which is available in print and online.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Upper School Student Poets Participate in OTR Poetry Workshop

By Maria Bobbitt-Chertock

(In mid-November) six Seven Hills Louder Than a Bomb team members — seniors Kaylan Young, Holly O’Neal, Zoe Zelkind, and Maria BobbittChertock; and juniors Jake Moses and Chase Byington — attended a poetry workshop at Over-the-Rhine’s Elementz. The event featured Dayton spoken word veteran Jay Martinez. After partaking in some performance and writing exercises, students from seven different schools competed in an open mic. O’Neal and Bobbitt-Chertock made it to the semi-final round, with Bobbitt-Chertock winning second place. Bobbitt-Chertock said the Seven Hills team, advised by English and journalism teacher Erich Schweikher, will host a citywide open mic in January.

________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Oct. 30, 2015

DSC_0064

College Board Invites Upper School Teacher to Lead Presentation

Seven Hills Upper School chemistry and environmental science teacher Linda Ford was recently invited by College Board to present on classroom strategies to enhance learning. Ford will present at the 2015 College Board Forum from Nov. 4-6 in Washington, D.C. The event is the preeminent annual gathering of K-12, higher education, and policy professionals from all areas of expertise. According to the College Board invitation to serve as a leader at this prestigious event, Ford will collaborate within a community of passionate educators about topics ranging from instruction to admission, counseling to financial aid, and administration to advocacy. She will also lead and inform the work of the College Board to best serve students during assembly meetings.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_4491English Teacher Edits and Designs Acclaimed Poetry Journal

Little did we know, English and journalism teacher Erich Schweikher is also an accomplished book editor. “Over the past few months I have been editing – with fellow Cincinnati poet Charles Gabel – and designing the annual poetry and poetics journal, Northside Review, said Schweikher. “Issue 1 just arrived from the printer last week and is now available at booksellers and retailers throughout Cincinnati, and online at northsidereview.com.” Northside Review is a respected regional journal that features poems by critically-acclaimed, nationally recognized poets, as well as featuring poets from southwest Ohio.

_____________________________________________________________

IMG_5431Students, Faculty Connect with Community During Upper School Service Learning Project

In a comprehensive Upper School activity called “Afternoon of Service,” a group of 400, which included all Upper School students and 35 faculty members, boarded buses to volunteer their efforts in several neighboring communities. The Oct. 23 service trip, planned and organized by director of experiential learning Nick Francis, included the following:

  • Cleaned up yards in Mt. Lookout at a residential house with People Working Together (PWC)
  • Planted trees in Madisonville
  • Painted of a residential garage with PWC
  • Cleared Ault Park of honeysuckle
  • Mixed paint at Matthew 25 Ministries
  • Used recycled goods to create educational games for children’s use, through Crayons to Computers
  • Cleaned up a Madisonville community area parking lot
  • Cleaned up and weeded yards at Woodford Paideia Elementary an
  • Cleaned up in a residential area in Kennedy Heights

Francis said the students signed up for the various volunteer opportunities. The students put in a collective 60 hours of community service in one afternoon. The hours are not counted toward their graduation requirement, which consists of 30 community service hours. Said Francis, “There was a sense that it was a good way to get everyone doing service together and build a community.”

_____________________________________________________________

IMG_9487National Chemistry Week

Upper School students had an opportunity to serve their community by putting on a science presentation for children and their parents in late October. Upper School science teacher Linda Ford took six sophomores to the Clifton Library to do hands-on activities and chemical demonstrations for children and their parents as part of National Chemistry Week. The students were required to practice their activities prior to the library visit. “They did a wonderful job interacting with children, ages 5 to 14,” said Ford. “The theme of this year’s event was ‘Chemistry Colors Our World.’ ”

_____________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Oct. 15, 2015

DSC_0955

New Computer Engineering Class

Upper School students are learning how to manipulate breadboards and Arduinos in Brian Arnold’s computer engineering class – the first of its kind in the history of Seven Hills. The students are currently learning how to safely navigate the lab, equipped with professional-grade equipment. “We want to give students access to a unique and valuable skillset of understanding the language of the building blocks for computers,” said Arnold. While the students work, they are also gaining more knowledge on a subconscious level. Arnold has labeled each of the student’s working stations with real names of streets in Silicon Valley, where it all began.

______________________________________________________________________________________

2015-09-09 11.45.59

Paper Strength

Students in Lenore Horner’s honors physics class put their knowledge of physics and their creative minds to the test when they completed Horner’s challenge to use only one sheet of paper to create a structure that would support as much weight as possible. “They could have no glue and no tape, but cutting was allowed,” said Horner, who also ruled out using layers of flat strips of their one sheet of paper. The students were very successful with their mission. The champion structure supported nearly 39kg – more than 85 pounds!

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Students Participate in Mayerson Student Service Leadership Workshop

Seven Upper School students, accompanied by Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis and English and journalism teacher Erich Schweikher, participated in the 16th Annual Mayerson Student Service Leadership Workshop at the University of Cincinnati in mid-September. Organized and presented by the Mayerson Foundation, the workshop offered nearly 550 students and teachers from around the tri-state the opportunity to meet like-minded individuals from high schools and colleges, attend three breakout sessions on a range of topics, and speak with representatives of more than 90 non-profit organizations. Student participants in the workshop are: Maria Bobbitt Chertock, Carly Cohen, Grace McVey, Varshini Odayar, Nia Page, Claire Stewart , and Kaylan Young

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0932Sun Printing

Students in Upper School science teacher Brian Berning’s class took their learning outside for a lesson in sun printing. Students placed leaves on paper treated with potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate. Once the paper is left in the sun for 10 to 20 minutes, the leaves, which block the UV rays of the sun, stay white, while the rest of the paper turns a rich blue. Negative or positive images can be obtained by blocking UV light from reaching the treated paper. The practice of sun printing is a popular activity used as a beautiful craft and study in UV rays, and is one of the oldest forms of negative printing.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Finding An Angle

College prep geometry students in Anne Ramsay’s math class turned a walk around campus into a study of congruent angles. As part of their study of different types of congruent angles, including supplementary and complimentary, the students used their iPads to take pictures of angles they found in a number of objects outside and in the Upper School hallways. Ramsay said the students presented their angles in conditional statement slide shows in late September. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Merit Commended Students

The Seven Hills School continues its tradition of excellence with 16 Seven Hills seniors – 19 percent of the 2016 graduating class – recently being named Commended Students in the 2015 National Merit Program. The Seven Hills School congratulates the following National Merit Commended Students: Maria Bobbitt Chertock, Brandi Bryson, Abigail Clark, Matthew Clayton, James Coyle, Elliot Glum, Ada Huang, Jacob Lautman, Matthew Marquardt, Mike Nazzaro, Kenneth Remaklus, Hayley Samson, Andrei Savu, Nicole Tiao, Camille Williams, and Jai Williams. The National Merit Program also recently released the names of our National Merit Semifinalists, bringing the total number of Commended Scholars and Semifinalists to 24 – 28.5 percent of the 2016 graduating class. Students qualify for recognition in the National Merit programs with their scores on the PSAT/NMSQT®.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

dt.common.streams.StreamServerSeven Hills Tops National Merit Percentage Among Peer Schools

After an extensive analysis of the percentage of students named National Merit Semifinalists based on the graduating class size of schools in Cincinnati, Seven Hills is pleased to announced that our Class of 2016 has produced the highest percentage of National Merit Semifinalists in Cincinnati with 9.6 percent of the graduating class receiving this prestigious recognition. “We are very proud of the Class of 2016 for many reasons, just one of which is their terrific scores,” said Assistant Head of School and Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs. “Twenty-nine percent of our graduating class has earned National Merit recognition and we’ve just learned that 9.6 percent of them are semifinalists, giving them the distinction of having the highest percentage in the city!”

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0674Dissecting Dystopias

As a culminating project for summer reading, sophomores in Nate Gleiner’s English class conducted a comparative analysis of George Orwell’s classic dystopian novel, 1984. The students’ project focus was to disprove English writer H.G. Wells’ theory that Utopian societies required a number of distinct conditions, such as advanced technology and centralized power. Instead, students were asked to use examples from books, such as Kurt Vonnegut’s Harrison Bergeron and E.M. Forster’s The Machine Stops to disprove Wells’ theory. “All of these authors who contradicted Wells said if you achieve these things you create an imperfect society,” said Gleiner. “They’re looking at the categories that Wells said you need to create perfection and showing how in fact they’re creating imperfection. It’s a way of using our summer reading as a vehicle for examining the traditional dystopias.”

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_0017Ninth Graders Benefit from New Advisory Format

For a ninth grader, Upper School is uncharted territory. As part of a new format that places all freshmen in ninth-grade-only advisory groups, the Upper School’s youngest students are getting to know their surroundings and their peers in a setting tailored to their needs. As a launch into Upper School, ninth graders participated in a retreat, as well as a scavenger hunt that acquainted them with the Upper School Campus while having fun. The advisory groups were given a list of locations ranging from the tennis courts to the Andress Art Gallery, the Knust conference room, and the office of the Dean of Students. “They had to find each landmark and take an advisory ‘selfie,’ once they arrived at each location,” said lead advisor for ninth grade Meredith Brown. “Once they had found all 12 locations, they had to find Upper School counselor Vicky Hausberger to show off their photo gallery and collect prizes.” Brown said the exercise was a fun way to get to know one another and become more familiar with the ins and outs of the Upper School building and facilities.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0909Archeological Artifacts

 

Ninth graders in Katie Swinford’s World History I class have been studying artifacts excavated from the ancient city of Troy. Swinford, also a Latin teacher, started off the layered project with a lecture on the Trojan War, followed by a review of the artifacts. “We’re interacting with these objects to help the students further understand a richer historical landscape of Ancient Rome,” said Swinford. “We will conclude our study with a discussion regarding whether the students believe the Trojan War really happened based on what they know about Homer’s epic poem, the Iliad, and the archaeological evidence for the war.” Swinford, a Ph.D. student in the classics department at University of Cincinnati, borrowed the artifacts from UC.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Sept. 11, 2015

IMG_1284

Congratulations to Our 8 National Merit Semifinalists!

The Seven Hills School continues its tradition of excellence with eight Seven Hills seniors – 9.5 percent of the 2016 senior class – qualifying as semifinalists in the 2015 National Merit Scholarship Program. National Merit Scholarship Corporation released the names of semifinalists on the morning of Sept. 9. Congrats to Fatima Anwar, Kate Coley, Tigar Cyr, Alex Jiang, Bennett Smith, Zachary Sorscher, Claire Stewart, and Kathy Wang. ?Click here to view the full story, posted on the Seven Hills homepage. https://www.7hills.org/podium/default.aspx?t=204&nid=990821

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0641Using Selfies in French curriculum!

Upper School students are using selfies in Wynne Curry’s French V class to practice their extensive knowledge of French vocabulary. Students produced a series of selfies portraying various moods and wrote French captions describing each mood. Curry’s assignment was popular with more people than just her students. The assignment received a number of reTweets from world language teachers throughout the country, including representatives of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), in just a few days!

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Ninth Grade Retreat

Ninth graders spent 24 hours together at a retreat especially designed to help smooth the transition from Middle to Upper School. The multi-faceted experience allowed them to make new friends, get to know their teachers, and spend time together in a setting other than the classroom – all important components of the early ninth-grade experience and in the process. The freshmen class had a fun-filled 24 hours at Camp Kern. Through activities and exercises with their peers, teachers, and administrators, they bonded as a class and gathered clearer expectations about Upper School. The activities not only strengthened their orientation process, but set foundations for important relationships throughout their Upper School careers.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Upper School Achievements

Of the 127 students who took AP exams in May, 97 percent earned a score of 3 or higher, generally considered the college-credit-granting criterion. In addition, 43% of the scores were 5’s – the highest score possible. For more information, click here to view the 2015-16 By the Numbers.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Summer Accomplishments

Upper School students participated in a number of amazing opportunities over the summer. Thank you to the college counseling department, which shared the following sampling of ways som of our Upper School students spent their summers. Our Upper School students participated in dozens of opportunities, from interning at Procter & Gamble, to job shadowing in a physical therapy office, to taking summer courses at Parsons School of Design in New York City. Click here to view a list of some of our students’ summer 2015 opportunities.

________________________________________________________________________

[collapse id=”collapse_41″]

[citem title=”Click here to read stories from the 2014-15 school year” id=”citem_29″ parent=”collapse_41″]

From The Buzz June 11, 2015

DSC_0113Congratulations, Class of 2015

Compassion and Family. The Class of 2015 was often described with these words as 79 Seven Hills seniors were honored on the evening of June 5. To the tune of Jean Joseph Mouret’s Rondeau played by The Northwind Brass Quintet, the young men and women proceeded to their seats in Kalnow Gym to take a next step in their lives during this momentous rite of passage. The students received a welcome from Student Senate members Daniel Sauers and Christopher Shoemaker. They were greeted by President of the Board of Trustees Beth Schiff and Head of School Chris Garten. The graduates also enjoyed a special tribute by Assistant Head of School Susan Marrs, who thanked the graduates for being such a loving, caring group of students who exemplified compassion and friendship throughout the school year. Speaking to an audience of nearly 1,000 family members and friends, keynote speaker retired Chairman and CEO of Procter & Gamble and co-chair of the National Underground Railroad and Freedom Center John Pepper challenged graduates to live their lives by principles they can write down on a paper napkin. The ceremony concluded with a heartwarming address by graduate George Karamanoukian, an awards presentation ceremony, which included endowed awards, departmental awards, and the Alumni Association Service Award, presented by Alumni Council President Scott Carroll `85 to Alex Hunter. Many thanks to Andi Guess, Kim Hogel, and the maintenance staff for organizing and setting up the event. Click here to view a photo gallery of the event.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Commencement Awards

Alumni Association Service Award

Alex Hunter – The Alumni Association Service Award is given to a senior who has an outstanding record of service to home and community.

Florence Fessenden Award

Christopher Janidlo – The Florence Fessenden Award is given to a senior for outstanding achievement in a certain academic area.

Carol Brestel Award

Claudia Gonzalez Fernandez – The Carol Brestel Award is selected by vote of the faculty “of a senior who combines enthusiasm and talent and who exhibits leadership in school life.”

Ruth Russell Jones Award

Turner Anderson and Adam Heines – The Ruth Russell Jones Award is awarded to seniors who have exhibited the greatest overall improvement and intellectual growth over a three-year period.

The Seven Hills Cup

Ellen Lu and Ellen Pasquale – The Seven Hills Cup is given to the leading scholars in the senior class.

Click here to view photos from the awards assembly.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Congratulations Graduates!

Congratulations to Seven Hills’ Class of 2015! Best wishes for continued success!

Seven Hills Class of 2015
Turner Von AndersonStefan David AntonssonJulian Joseph BarettaConnor Robert BarnhartZoe Maia BarnhartNicole BarresiConnor Penn BartonMcLean Robert BassettAdam Clinton BufordDanielle Lauren CallerJackson Joseph CallowGrace O’Grady CarrollGrace Louise CawdreyHenry Jack ChavezAlayna Young-Jean ChooBenjamin M. ChungMadeline Mathers ColeCarl William ComptonAvery Elizabeth CoombeIsaiah Nolen DanielsJeffrey William DedekerArjun V. DheenanStuart Norbert Edwards

Maxwell Alan Even

Claudia Fernández Gonzalez

Lindsay Nicole Finn

Leo Andrew Fried

Sara Elizabeth Gerhardt

Duncan Gibson

Brian Price Goertemoeller

Bryden William Goings

Margaret Heekin Gosiger

Charles Nicholas Gregory

Andrew Joseph Head

Adam Frieder Heines

Alexander Conarchy Hunter

Christopher Dalton Janidlo

Ian McGoff Douglas Jeffries

Sydney Taylor Jones

Sarah Elizabeth Kanter

Srishti Kapur

George Henry Karamanoukian

Elizabeth Pauline Kennedy

Pearce Charles Kieser

Benjamin David King

Corinne Jane Kirkwood

Chasya Bracha Klafter

Ike Denman Lanier

Alexander Gabriel Li

Joanne Li

Ellen Lu

Nicole Ashley Malofsky

Keith Mandel

Mason Mayfield

Dennis Kenyon Harrington Moriarty

Katherine Davis Murphy

Jared Isaiah Nelson

Ellen Kaye Pasquale

Jan Maxwell Pochobradsky

Mitchell Benjamin Polonsky

Elizabeth Breslin Randman

Benjamin Tucker Robinson

Mollie Carter Rouan

Matthew Lee Saporito

Daniel Warner Sauers

Simona Isabelle Scheiber

Matthew Ryan Sharpe

Christopher Mark Shoemaker

Jacob Rossin Sizer

Evan Andrew Smithers

Kristin Curtis Stratman

Judy Sun

Clarke Worth Waskowitz

Joshua Jerome Weaver

Chauyie Wei

Tessa Marie Weisenborn

Bailey Elaine Wharton

Andrew Murray Wilson

Sean Lance Yoshitomi-Gray

_________________________________________________________

Colleges and Universities our 2014 Graduates will Attend:

American College of Marbella (Spain)
American University of Paris
Bowdoin College
Bucknell University
Case Western Reserve University
Catholic University of America
Colgate University
Columbia University
Cornell UniversityDenison UniversityDePaul UniversityDuke UniversityEarlham College
Elon University
George Washington University
Gettysburg CollegeHarvard UniversityIndiana University
Lehigh UniversityOhio UniversityOhio State UniversityMiami UniversityMt. Saint Joseph UniversityMuskingum CollegeNew York UniversityRhode Island School of Design

 
 
Syracuse University
The CitadelThomas More CollegeTulane UniversityUniversity of Adelaide (Australia)
University of AkronUniversity of British Columbia
University of ChicagoUniversity of CincinnatiUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Pennsylvania
University of PittsburghUniversity of Richmond
University of Rochester
University of South Carolina
University of St. Andrews (Scotland)University of VermontVanderbilt University
Virginia Commonwealth UniversityWake Forest UniversityWashington University in St. LouisWilmington CollegeYeshiva University

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Awards

Congratulations to all Seven Hills award recipients. The following departmental awards were presented at Awards Day at the Upper School:

Holly O’Neal was presented the Miriam Titcomb Award, the highest honor awarded to a junior, for exhibiting excellence in “initiative in some area, originality in some area, love of fellow man, and courage of convictions.”

Joshua Weaver was presented the Clement L. Buenger Award on behalf of the Fund for Independent Schools of Cincinnati (FISC) to a senior.

Kenneth Remaklus received the Neil Smith Scholarship, which is presented to a student in grade 9, 10, or 11 who best exemplifies the qualities for which Neil Smith is known. He/she must “meet the world with optimism and good will, expect the best from themselves and others, and exhibit, courage, compassion, integrity, and intelligence.”

Personal Achievement Award – Presented to the students whose contributions have made Seven Hills a better place.

Lucy Callard (9)

Shelby Davis and Shane DiGiovanna (10)

Michael Chamberlin (11)

Lindsay Finn (12)

Matisse Peppet received the Sophomore Scholastic Achievement Award. This is awarded to the sophomore who exhibits a scholarly temperament and who has contributed the benefits of learning in a given discipline to the School and/or the wider community. This student exhibits a love of learning and intellectual curiosity, and shares enthusiasm for the discipline with others.

Cathy Fang received the Citizenship Award. This is awarded to the student who takes an active role in school and/or community affairs, and who exhibits mature political and global consciousness and a sense of civic responsibility.

Maria Bobbitt Chertock was given the Creativity and Original Thinking Award. This is awarded to the student who is given to independent thinking, and who has displayed an inquisitive and creative habit of mind.

Kate Coley was awarded the Community Scholar Award, presented to the student “who has shown exceptional achievement in a given discipline and who has extended that knowledge to benefit the larger community.”

Click here to view the awards ceremony.

Department Awards

Andress Art Award – Tessa Weisenborn

Theater Award – Kate Murphy

English Award – Clarke Waskowitz

Kathy Richardson Award – Curtis Sun

History Award – Carl Compton

Math Award – Pearce Kieser

Biology Award – Abby Clark

Chemistry Award – Matthew Marquardt

Physics Award – Zach Sorscher

Chinese Award – Andrew Wilson

French Award – Kaylan Young

Latin Award – Grace Cawdrey

Spanish Award – Alayna Choo

Female Athlete of the Year – Maggie Gosiger

Male Athletes of the Year – Pearce Kieser and Tucker Robinson

Female Scholar Athlete – Alayna Choo

Male Scholar Athlete – Pearce Kieser

Female Archie Griffin Sportsmanship Award – Mollie Rouan

Male Archie Griffin Sportsmanship Award – Stefan Antonsson

Senate Award – History teacher and college readiness counselor Beth Driehaus

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Class Day

Upper School students enjoyed Seven Hills’ traditional Class Day, a celebration of the seniors’ last day at Upper, which is full of goodbyes, choral selections, games, accolades from peers, and a light-hearted announcement of the student-voted senior superlatives.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0156Seven Hills Network of African-American Parents Honor Students

Students and families who are members and supporters of Seven Hills Network of African American Parents (SNAAP) honored Seven Hills students of African-American descent during an annual end-of-year SNAAP banquet on the afternoon of June 7. Seven Hills parent Theo Nelson gave an invocation. Head of School Chris Garten applauded the students and their families for a year of dedication and purpose. Global Research & Development Director at Procter & Gamble Illya Thomas delivered a poignant keynote message entitled, “Success is a journey, not a destination.” The banquet also included a signature libation memorial ceremony, officiated by Seven Hills parent and Board of Trustee member Jan-Michele Kearney. Many thanks to parents Erica Vaughn, Leslie Bryson, and several other parents in the SNAAP committee for organizing the event. Click here to view a photo gallery of the event.

The SNAAP honorees for 2014-2015 school year are as follows:

Rising sixth graders

Gabrielle Christmon

Ric DeLyons

Jack Fechter

Kamaia Hall-Edwards

Asher Kearney

Rising eighth graders

Khepri Campbell

Jarin Davis

Brandon Dinan

Brice Hill

Ty’Asia Hudlin

Class of 2015

Adam Buford

Isaiah Daniels

Bryden Goings

Sydney Jones

Jared Nelson

Joshua Weaver

________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0314Tournament of Greatness

In a debate tournament that resembles something like Clash-of-the-Titans-meets-Presidential-Debates, students in Upper School history teacher Jen Faber’s class wrapped up the Tournament of Greatness with an intense flourish. After a number of rounds, the debate, which incorporates student research of a key figure in history in a debate setting to determine the greatest leader, came down to Gandhi, portrayed by sophomore Sean Moser vs. Muhammad, portrayed by freshman Lucy Callard. Moser won the debate, making this year his second year in a row, which has never been done before, said Faber.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0740Students Build and Design Community Table

Those who walk through Four Corners in the Upper School have definitely eyed a colorful new piece of furniture. The Community Table, which bears scrawling signatures and words, is part of a collaborative social justice project led by English teacher and Chair of the Equity and Justice Committee Nate Gleiner, as well as a number of students who attended the Student Diversity Leadership Conference at the People of Color Conference in Indianapolis this spring. The collapsible table was unveiled and dedicated in the Andress Alumni Art Gallery. “The students worked with Upper School parents Alex and Phoebe Pardo to design a table that will provide both a metaphoric and literal space for students and faculty to engage in conversations about issues affecting our school and the larger world,” said Gleiner. “This table is a space for everyone to share and engage in dialogue. It is our hope that the table will be an important step in furthering the sense of community we share at this school, and that it will foster a willingness to confront and discuss essential, and sometimes even controversial topics.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Buzz May 28, 2015

DSC_0682Upper School Students Design Lesson Plans for Lotspeich Students

Upper School students in Linda Ford’s Environmental Science Class recently presented their major semester projects. Some of the students, such as junior Cathy Fang, senior Matthew Sharpe, and a few other students, chose to base their projects on building and presenting a lesson plan for students who attend Lotspeich. Fang presented a lesson on the importance of the wetlands to Natalie Williams’ first grade science class in April, while senior Matthew Sharpe led an activity on solar energy with the fourth graders.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Alayna Choo
Alayna Choo

2015 National Merit Scholarship Award Recipient

The National Merit Scholarship Corporation recently named senior Alayna Choo a National Merit Scholarship winner. She will receive a $2,500 scholarship award. Choo will attend University of Pennsylvania this fall. Click here to read more about Choo’s accomplishments in an online Cincinnati Enquirer article:

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Bennett Smith
Bennett Smith

Junior Earns Top Composite ACT Score

Congratulations to junior Bennett Smith, who recently achieved a top composite score on the ACT test. Among test takers in the high school graduating class of 2014, only 1,407 of nearly 1.85 million students earned a composite score of 36. Read more about what American College Testing CEO Jon Whitmore said about Smith’s accomplishments in a recent online Cincinnati Enquirer article- http://local.cincinnati.com/share/story/222610

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Ohio Math League

During lunch six times during the school year, many Upper School students participated in the Ohio Math League competition. Top scorers for our school (in order) are: Matisse Peppet, Tigar Cyr, Calvin Arbenz, Alex Jiang, Matthew Clayton, Pearce Kieser, Andrei Savu, Curtis Sun, James Coyle, Claire Stewart, and Lindsay Finn.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

American Mathematics Competition

Approximately 140 Seven Hills Middle and Upper School students participated in the American Mathematics Competition (AMC) in late February. This prestigious annual exam is a 75-minute test and is given in two divisions. One division is for students up to and including grade 10 (AMC10) and the other is for students up to and including grade 12 (AMC 12). Top scorers for Seven Hills on the AMC 10 were eighth grader Max Yuan, and sophomores Matisse Peppet, Jack Lu, Barret Gao, and Chase Gardner. Top scorers for Seven Hills on the AMC 12 were juniors Tigar Cyr, Alex Jiang, Nicole Tiao, and Bennett Smith. Cyr scored in the top 5 percent nationally on the AMC 12 and was invited to a further round, the American Invitational Mathematics Exam.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 2.57.27 PMTrip to Beacon

This year’s Anatomy and Physiology class was once again invited to Beacon Orthopaedics to participate in an anatomy lecture and cadaver lab. Trey Jurgens who organizes these experiential programs for high school students did a wonderful job in creating a terrific experience for our students. Seven Hills parent Dr. Allison Phelps led the lecture over the anatomy and related disorders of the knee. She also participated in the cadaver lab where the students were able to perform procedures on actual human knees. “This was an amazing opportunity for the Seven Hills students!” said anatomy and physiology teacher Bridget Ancalmo. “We can’t thank the wonderful staff at Beacon for having us there enough!”

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Junior Heads to National Math Competition

Junior Tigar Cyr and sophomore Matisse Peppet participated in Ohio High School Mathematics Invitational Olympiad, sponsored by the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Cyr placed 13th in the Cipering Round and was invited to join the team representing the State of Ohio in the American Regions Math League (ARML), a national mathematics competition, which will be held in early June.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

graduates with alum parents croppedCountdown to Graduation

Seniors enjoyed the annual Countdown to Graduation breakfast on Wednesday, May 20, sponsored by the Alumni Association and Development Office. The annual breakfast is a kick-off for the school’s graduation celebrations. This year’s senior class includes a record number of alumni children whose parents joined them at the breakfast:

Mac Bassett, son of Gary Bassett `82 and Nancy McCormick Bassett `83; Grace Carroll, daughter of Scott Carroll `85; Avery Coombe, daughter of Michael L`72 and Tucker (Jones) Coombe `79; Carl Compton, son of Mary Ida Sloneker Compton `77; Libby Gerhardt, daughter of Marty Mueller Gerhardt `85; Pearce Kieser, son of Mary Lynne Boorn `84; Ike Lanier, son of Jane Garvey C`74; Liza Randman, daughter of Muff Hays `79; Tucker Robinson, son of Jeff Robinson `83; and Bailey Wharton, daughter of Paula White Wharton `83.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________The The Buzz May 14, 2015

2015 French Honor Society inductees
2015 French Honor Society inductees

French and Spanish Honor Societies

World languages department chair and French teacher Ann Griep and Spanish teacher Ismael Godoy recently inducted new members into the French and Spanish Honor Societies.

Spanish Honor Society Inductees:

Holly O’Neal, Kate Coley, Sallie Hatfield, Ben Chung, Andrei Savu

French Honor Society Inductees:

Fatima Anwar, Mac Bassett, Maria Bobbitt, Anne Chalmers, Henry Chavez, Lauren Collette, Avery Coombe, Maggie Gosiger, Brian Hills, Alex Hunter, Alex Jiang, Ike Lanier, Matthew Marquardt, Mitch Polonsky, Daniel Sauers, Matthew Sharpe, Evan Smithers, Kristin Stratman, Carolina Visoso, Kathy Wang, Camille Williams

2015 Spanish Honor Society inductees
2015 Spanish Honor Society inductees

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Students Claim Three Perfect Scores, Excel Overall in National Latin Exam

Middle and Upper School Latin students in grades 7-12 took the National Latin Exam and 20 in grades 8-11 competed at the 65th annual Ohio Junior Classical League convention in Columbus. Congratulations to our Latin students and Latin teacher Brian Sebastian. Here is a summary of Upper School students’ results for each event, which includes three perfect scores:

Ninth grade (Latin II exam)

Gold Medal – Summa Cum Laude: Charlie Dwight (perfect score), Nate Rising, Zoe Parlier, Carly Jones, Jonathan Harsh

Silver Medal – Maxima Cum Laude: Lucy Callard, Matthew Maring, Nicholas Williams, Michael Barresi, Lena Bauer, Matthew Kreines, Ben Agin

Cum Laude: Thomas Arya

10th grade (Latin III Prose Exam)

Gold Medal – Summa Cum Laude: Matisse Peppet, Jack Lane, Jacob Weinstein

Silver Medal – Maxima Cum Laude: Calvin Arbenz, Devi Namboodiri, Chase Gardner

Magna Cum Laude: Scott Arnold, Piper Spooner, Daniel Grass, Quinn Shim

Cum Laude: Shane DiGiovanna

11th grade (Latin IV Poetry Exam)

Gold Medal – Summa Cum Laude: Tigar Cyr (book award), Bennett Smith (book award), Nicole Tiao

12th grade (Latin V Exam)

Gold Medal – Summa Cum Laude: Ben King (book award)

Silver Medal – Maxima Cum Laude: Chas Gregory, Andrew Wilson

Magna Cum Laude: Grace Cawdrey, Carl Compton

Cum Laude: Jeff Dedeker

________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_0745OJCL Convention

The Ohio Junior Classical League (OJCL) is the state organization that promotes the study of the Latin language and classical civilization. It is part of the National Junior Classical League, which has more than 47,000 members. Seven Hills students earned a number of honors in the OJCL convention, which took place in late April. Congratulations to our Latin students and Latin teacher Brian Sebastian. Of 22 schools in attendance, Seven Hills finished third place in Academic Per Capita, fourth place in Overall Per Capita, sixth place in Overall Sweepstakes, and state runner-up in Certamen Level 2.

Out of more than 550 student delegates, these students earned overall honors:

Freshman Charlie Dwight: Best in Show (vocabulary test), sixth place in Overall Academic Points, member of the state runner-up Level 2 Certamen team

Sophomore Matisse Peppet: first place in Creative Arts Sweepstakes, seventh place in Overall Academic Points, school record in total points (112), fourth place in Overall Sweepstakes Points

The following students placed in the top 10 in a number of categories:

Freshmen – Charlie Dwight, Lena Bauer, Jonathan Harsh, Carly Jones, and Zoe Parlier

Sophomores – Calvin Arbenz, Shane DiGiovanna, Chase Gardner, Daniel Grass , Devi Namboodiri, Jack Lane, Noelle O’Neal, Matisse Peppet, Piper Spooner, Jacob Weinstein

Juniors – Nicole Tiao, Tigar Cyr, Clay Hausberger

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_2642Personal Challenge

One student designed and crafted a more efficient cell phone case. Another built a computer. Another learned to play a traditional Chinese string instrument. The second half of Personal Challenge concluded in late April. Seniors and some juniors showcased their yearlong efforts with pride as the School community showed appreciation and admiration for all of their hard work. Personal Challenge is a graduation requirement unique to Seven Hills. The purpose of the intensive project is to present students with opportunities to explore their passions with a strong sense of their individualities. Click here to view photos of Personal Challenge.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0196Acting out Word Problems

When Upper School math teacher Anna Works-McKinney’s students struggled to understand a geometry word problem, she told them to stand up. Works-McKinney brought lesson to life by asking students to represent each component of the math problem. “The students needed to find the height of a tower based on the angle of elevation from a point to the south of the tower, a point to the west of the tower and the distance between the two points,” said Works-McKinney. One student stood on the desk, a few laid down on the floor or stood off to the side. Once the students were in position, Works-McKinney explained the math problem using the placement of the students. “We did it this way because students were having a very hard time figuring out what was actually going on based on the word problem,” said Works-McKinney. “As soon as we did that, they were able to solve the problem on their own.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

computer scienceStudents Excel in American Computer Science League

Seven Hills Upper School students participated in the American Computer Science League (ACSL) competitions in late April. Despite the name “American,” this competition draws more than 200 teams from the United States, Canada, Europe, Africa, and Asia. There are four contests throughout the school year, and each contest consists of two parts: a 30-minute timed test, and a programming problem that students have up to 72 hours to complete on their own. Computer Science teacher and contest advisor Brian Arnold said, “These problems can be quite difficult and cover some topics of computer science not often mastered in a typical high school programming class.” Arnold said tests may include topics such as Boolean logic, digital electronics, data structures, graph theory, string processing, LISP, bit string flicking, and prefix/infix/postfix notation. Arnold said the problems are challenging and a perfect score on either the test or the programming problem is difficult to achieve, but several students were able to achieve a perfect score on either the test or the programming problem at least once during the year. These students are freshmen Jonathan Harsh and Matthew Maring, and juniors Alex Jiang, Matthew Clayton, Mehul Patel, and Tigar Cyr, and senior Chris Janidlo. In addition, Jiang, Clayton, and Janidlo achieved perfect scores on both the test and programming problemsfor at least one of the contests during the year. “I’m happy to see so many of our students participate in this competition, and I’m happy to see so much effort applied to mastering these new topics,” said Arnold. “I’m especially impressed considering how busy our students are with other activities throughout the school year. Well done.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2015-04-11 17.13.14Miami University High School Programming Contest

In early April, six Upper School students traveled to Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, to participate in the 28th Annual Miami University High School Programming Contest. The computer science competition draws students from high schools in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan, and challenges students to write programs to solve difficult problems over a four-hour period. The six Upper School students, freshmen Matthew Maring and Louann Kovach, juniors Mehul Patel, Alex Jiang, and Tiger Cyr; and senior Pearce Kieser formed two teams that were tasked with developing solutions to difficult problems in the difficult environment of one computer per team. Computer Science teacher and coach Brian Arnold reported that both teams did well in the competition, with the Seven Hills team of Jiang, Patel, and Kovach briefly in 3rd place midway through the competition. They eventually ended up in 6th place overall out of over twenty teams. “I’m very proud of our students this year, and I’m especially happy to have such a strong group of juniors and freshmen,” said Arnold. “This competition includes elements of computer science, teamwork, communication, and project management strategies, and I’m looking forward to our students getting even stronger in the next year.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

AthensAcropolisParthenonStudents Immerse Themselves in History During Italy/Greece Trip

Fourteen upper school Latin students traveled to Greece and Italy this spring, with Latin teacher Brian Sebastian and Latin and history teacher Katie Swinford. The trip is a recent addition to the traveling component of the Seven Hills’ World Languages program. The first day was spent exploring the Plaka neighborhood of Athens, Greece, and concluded with a dinner of traditional Greek dishes like tiropita (cheese pies), tzatziki, and moussaka. The next two days included touring the Athenian acropolis, site of the famous temple to Athena, the Parthenon, and the Athenian agora, the commercial and political center of ancient Athens. Students walked the hallowed ground where Cleisthenes founded the world’s first radical democracy, and Socrates was tried and executed for “corrupting the youth” of Classical Athens. The students made friends with groups of Greek students traveling for their own spring break to Italy on the overnight ferry from Greece to Italy. The first night in Italy was spent in the charming seaside village of Sorrento before the group visited the haunting ruins of Pompeii and the famous Farnese sculpture galleries in Naples. Students became budding epigraphers as they translated their way through Latin (and sometimes Greek!) building inscriptions and statue dedications scattered throughout Rome. Sebastian said the group enjoyed plenty of gelato breaks between site visits and ate its way through Roman delicacies like veal saltimbocca, pasta carbonara, and steamed artichokes.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Buzz April 16, 2015

DSC_0584Cum Laude

The Upper School honored its new inductees in the Seven Hills chapter of the Cum Laude Society, a national honor society that recognizes academic excellence, at the Cum Laude program on April 15. New members are juniors Fatima Anwar, Maria Bobbitt Chertock, Kate Coley, Alex Jiang, Matthew Marquardt, Holly O’Neal, Nicole Tiao, and Kathy Wang; and seniors Nicole Barresi, Adam Buford, Claudia Fernández Gonzalez, Ellen Lu, Nicole Malofsky, and Chris Shoemaker. The event also honored the members who were inducted last year as juniors: Stefan Antonsson Grace Cawdrey, Alayna Choo, Jeff Dedeker Pearce Kieser, Ben King, and Ellie Pasquale. Guest speaker at the dinner was Seven Hills alumna Elida Kamine ’99, who encouraged the students to maintain the joy of learning they developed at Seven Hills. Head of School Chris Garten said, “Modeled after Phi Beta Kappa at the college level, the Cum Laude Society recognizes academic excellence in some of this country’s most prestigious high schools. Membership is strictly limited to schools with exemplary academic programs, and Seven Hills is one of just a handful in Ohio. Induction today means that these students are being recognized as among the best of the best in secondary education in the nation.” Click here to view more photos from the Cum Laude event.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_2505Cincinnati Regional Science Olympiad

Congratulations to the students who competed in the Cincinnati Regional Science Olympiad at UC Blue Ash College in March. The following Seven Hills teams earned medals:

  • 6th place in Disease Detectives team 6: Judy Sun and Samantha Eng
  • 6th place in Astronomy team 8: Chris Janidlo
  • 5th place in Anatomy and Physiology team 6: Ellen Lu and Samantha Eng
  • 2nd place in Chemistry Lab team 6: Alex Jiang
  • 2nd place in Write It, Do It team 6: Samantha Eng and Alex Jiang

 

Physics and chemistry teacher Lenore Horner explained that the Astronomy, Anatomy and Physiology, and Disease Detectives are written tests. The Chemistry Lab event is a lab in which students must take data and use that data to answer a question. The Write It, Do It category has one team member create a written description of a made object. That description is given to the other team members who have not seen the object but must, from supplied materials, construct a copy of the object. The Ohio Science Olympiad is an academic, interscholastic competition designed to increase student interest in science and to improve the quality of science education. It has grown from just 23 teams competing in state competition in 1985 to 280 teams competing in seven regional tournaments in 2014. The program is sponsored by The Ohio State University, the Ohio Department of Education, and the Science Education Council of Ohio.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Holly O'Neal performs in a promotional video for "Louder Than a Bomb"
Holly O’Neal performs in a promotional video for “Louder Than a Bomb”

Seven Hills Students Make Finals in Poetry Competition

Famed youth poetry competition “Louder Than a Bomb Cincinnati” named The Seven Hills School finalists in team and individual categories. Seven Hills junior Sophia Pardo and seniors Mitchell Polonsky and Joanne Li were named individual finalists. Nine Seven Hills students will participate in the “Louder than a Bomb (LTAB)” poetry slam finals on April 18 at the Harriet Tubman Theater in the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. “The Seven Hills Louder than a Bomb team has been writing, memorizing, and performing their poems at venues throughout Cincinnati since September,” said Seven Hills Upper School English teacher and LTAB coach Erich Schweikher. “This is a wonderfully talented and diverse group of poets.” Seven Hills students, some of whom were featured in a recent local Public Radio broadcast, also were invited to perform their group work at the “Art & Poetry at Findlay Market” event on April 12. Click the following link to listen to a WXVU broadcast, which includes a feature on Seven Hills’ Pardo and Polonsky: http://wvxu.org/post/poetry-slam-blends-arts-youth-cultures. In addition, Maria Bobbitt-Chertock’s poetry recitation was featured on Fox 19 on April 15: http://www.fox19.com/Clip/11391832/louder-than-a-bomb.

The Seven Hills poetry team consists of Maria Bobbitt-Chertock, Mitch Polansky, Clarke Waskowitz, and Claudia Fernandez. In addition, Seven Hills’ group poem consisting of Claudia Fernandez, Grace Cawdrey, Chris Shoemaker, and Ellen Lu will be featured in the Finals opening ceremonies and in some promotional events leading up to April 18. In all, nine Seven Hills poets will participate in the Louder than a Bomb Finals.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

physics bandMusical Minds in Physics

Using anything from rubber bands, to PVC pipe, to drinking straws, Tim Drew’s physics students carried out their charge: Make a usable musical instrument and collaborate with classmates to perform a song in a small band. Using physics principles to create vibration and sound, the students had different levels of success but in the end, they were all able to produce sound. Drews’ guidelines asked that each student create an instrument unlike the others in their group, and that they play at least three harmonics different from everyone else in their impromptu band.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0718French Around the World

As part of an intensive study in March, world languages department chair Ann Griep’s French IV students learned about the major French-speaking regions of the world, heard from someone they know well: Middle School language teacher and native French speaker Jacky Kalubi. “We were doing a unit on French-speaking countries in central Africa,” said Griep. “Jacky came to talk about the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), her native country, and its close neighbor, Congo. Kalubi gave an overview of their different colonial histories and then focused on some current social and political issues as well as lifestyle in the two nations, particularly in the two capital cities of Brazzaville (Congo) and Kinshasa (DRC) where she is from.” Kalubi took the presentation a step further by serving beignets, a popular street food in both nations.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Buzz March 12, 2015

IMG_0622
by Barb Hepp

Depicting Early Marketing in 19th Century France

Tapping into the sophistication of their honed linguistic skills, students in Wynne Curry’s French V class studied the work of Emile Zola and applied it to their original depictions of successful logos used in early French marketing. “Zola’s Au Bonheur des Dames – one of his major literary works in the 20-volume Rougon-Macquart series – is about the rise of the first department store in Paris at the end of the 19th century and all of the strategies employed to ‘seduce’ the clients,” said Curry. “We watched a French news report on the importance of logos in marketing.” Curry said the students selected and discussed in French two actual images that detailed the particularities of successful logos. As part of the last activity, the students designed a logo for the 19th century department store.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0774Golden Ratio

Students in Anne Ramsay’s college prep geometry class perfected the formula for constructing the perfect rectangle in a class they will not soon forget. With a gold lamé cape draped over her shoulders, Ramsay handed out various four-sided shapes of sparkling gold card stock. Students first determined whether their shapes reflected the golden ratio. If they did not, they cut the shape down to reflect the golden ratio, meaning the ratio of the sides is the same as the ratio of their sum of the larger of the two quantities. What happened when they achieved the shape that is supposed to appear as the most “aesthetically pleasing” rectangle? Ramsay ceremoniously tossed the cape to that student, who wore it until the next student achieved it.

DSC_0782

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0985Recycling, Up Close

Linda Ford and her environmental science students took a close look at what happens beyond the recycling bin. Ford and the six students toured the Rumpke Recycling plant on March 9, to further understand the impact recycling has on the local and global environment. Before the tour, students suited up in hardhats, reflective vests and goggles. The students then observed the recycling from the moment it enters Rumpke’s Vine Street plant to the moment workers manipulate the material on conveyor belts. Ford and her students concluded their visit with a Q & A session.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0693

Experiential Learning Special Assembly

The Upper School has welcomed a number of professionals throughout the year to share their expertise as part of the school’s experiential learning program. During February and March, experiential learning director Nick Francis has invited experts in the engineering and design, and communications fields. In late February, Eyk Plaetrick, director of product supply and global engineering for Procter & Gamble, and THP Limited structural engineer and Seven Hills alumna Mindy Barber (Moser) ’05 shared their experiences. Alumna Sara Eisen ’02 later shared stories from her life as a reporter for CNBC.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0770Math in the Real World

Using Algebraic equations, students in Cassie Levesque’s honors algebra II class explained a number of applications through detailed and well-researched presentations. Levesque asked students to select their focus, which included a choice of decibels, carbon dating, stellar magnitude, the Richter scale, and the pH of a solution. As part of their presentations, students were required to include brief descriptions and the history of their application and use evidence to explain the mathematics used in their calculations. They also incorporated useful graphics, shared website tools, and offered sample questions and answers for their classmates to solve, in order to help them gain greater comprehension of the application. While students worked in groups, each student gave a presentation on their researched topic.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________From The Buzz Feb. 26, 2015

2015UpperHauckHauck Award Winners

Congratulations to the winners of the 2015 Frederick Hauck Scholarship for Commitment and Achievement in the Fields of Mathematics and Science ­– sophomore Chase Gardner and juniors Matthew Marquardt and Mike Nazzaro. The Frederick Hauck Scholarships are made possible through the generosity of the Frederick A. Hauck Foundation. Dr. Hauck was a world-renowned nuclear scientist and philanthropist who established the scholarships at Seven Hills to recognize students who demonstrate outstanding achievement and commitment in math and/or science. Each winning student entering grades nine through 12 will receive a one-year scholarship of $1,000 to be applied to his/her 2014-2015 tuition at Seven Hills.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

FullSizeRender

Connecting with Books for Lunch Author Colum McCann

Upper School students connected with Books for Lunch keynote speaker and New York Times bestselling author Colum McCann, who shared his message of empathy and community with students, families, and faculty for two days in early February. McCann, a prolific author of eight novels, shared snippets of his life’s work with Middle and Upper School students in Kalnow Gym, encouraging them to get in touch with the souls of their communities by “ripping out your GPS and learning how to be lost.” McCann, who only in the past year started using a cell phone, said he is more interested in connecting with people through listening and telling their stories. Dozens of students waited in long lines in the Young Family Library to have an opportunity to visit with McCann. During his talk with students in the library McCann encouraged students interested in creative writing to “read, read, read” and get in tune with the rhythm and soul of the subject of their writing. Said McCann, “The most important thing is to listen to others’ stories, remember those stories, and continue to tell them.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

photo 4Environmental Science Class Trip

On January 21, 15 Upper School students came up close and personal with zoo animals usually seen from afar, when they spent the night at the Cincinnati Zoo. The students included members of Linda Ford’s environmental science class, as well as members of the environmental club. The evening began with a tour of the food commissary, a visit to the cat house, and a peek at the indoor facilities for the giraffes. “Upon our return to the educational building, we had personal encounters with a skunk, a porcupine named Caroline, a barn owl, and a boa,” said Ford. “The conversation focused on shared landscapes among humans and other large predators and highlighted the educational and conservational work of the zoo in the grasslands of Kenya.”

photo 3

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_0132Magnified Giving

Ninth graders recently launched extensive discussions around selecting a local charity that will receive a $1,000 donation from local philanthropist Roger Grein. On Feb. 12, Grein, Founder and President of Magnified Giving, shared his story with the ninth graders. Grein shared that he dealt with much adversity throughout his life, but learned how to overcome it. He wanted to play sports, but was born with a disability that didn’t allow him to do so. Instead of walking away from his dream, he became a team manager and later coached softball for 36 years. Grein discussed the history of Magnified Giving, an initiative he founded that allows high school students from Ohio and Kentucky the opportunity to give a $1,000 grant to a local non-profit agency. Ninth grade participants will work with director of experiential learning Nick Francis and associate librarian Gail Bloom to begin the process of researching local non-profits to narrow down the agencies through site visits, and finally, to select the grant recipient. “Students were impressed with Grein’s commitment to philanthropy and look forward to this experience,” said Bloom. “We look forward to facilitating the ninth graders through this very important, thoughtful process.” Last year’s ninth graders awarded the grant to Interfaith Hospitality Network, a family shelter in Cincinnati.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Model UN

The Seven Hills Model UN team of 24 students put forth great effort at the Earlham College Model UN Conference that they attended on Jan 30 and 31. The students and history department chair Brian Wabler returned with three awards, including senior Claudia Fernandez, who won “Most Improved Delegation” on the Historical Security Council in discussions that simulated the UN’s deliberations over the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. Seniors Srishti Kapur and Avery Coombe won “Best Delegation” for the UNICEF committee, which discussed issues relating to children and poverty. On a related note, the Model UN conference will take place in March in Oxford, Ohio.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Jan. 29, 2015

IMG_0323Computer Programming Class

Upper School students solved Java expressions in Brian Arnold’s programming II class during the week of Jan. 19. Students learned several coding principles, such as “&&” represents “and”, “//” represents “or”, and “!” represents “not” in Java. Several of Arnold’s students will participate in the nationally-known Tech Olympics, run by the INTERalliance, which will take place at the Millennium Hotel in downtown Cincinnati in February. The INTERalliance is a collaborative effort of Greater Cincinnati Regional businesses and educators, creating an environment that gives local young IT talent a compelling reason to stay in southwest Ohio both for college and their careers. Founding members include Procter & Gamble, the University of Cincinnati, and Atos Origin.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_0099Upper School Parents Association Donates “Stress Relief” to Library

The library isn’t just for studying or group work. When Upper School students have a free bell, they are welcome to visit the library to knit with new knitting kits or play chess on chess sets donated by the Upper School Parents Association. “This is a great way to use their brains, while also taking a break, said Middle and Upper School librarian Suzanne Dix. Dix and associate librarian Gail Bloom asked the Upper School Parent’s Association if they would fund a few chess boards and the association responded with the boards and the knitting equipment, which includes video tutorials for the knitting activity. We are very grateful for their support,” said Bloom. “The chess boards have been in high demand since the day they arrived, and the knitting kits will be available for students in February.”

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Lauren Collette
Lauren Collette

Junior Creates Videos For Local Non-Profit – By Seven Hills junior Bennett Smith

Film artist Lauren Collette is using her talents to promote the cause of the Madisonville Education and Assistance Center (MEAC). Collette, who has family and friends who volunteer at the Center, aims to highlight the deeds of MEAC. The local center seeks to “provide clothes, food, and really anything that families can’t afford themselves.” Annual drives, especially during the holidays, which Collette notes is the “hardest time” for the Center, collect as many as 300 turkeys for Thanksgiving and hundreds of toys for Christmas. MEAC also runs an early literacy program at the John P. Parker School in Madisonville.

Through her “short, two and a half to three minute informational videos,” Collette seeks to capture the effect that MEAC has on the community. “I know that, at least for me, when I see something in action, when I see its effects, I develop a strong connection with what I’m watching. Maybe if people see these videos, how thrilled people are when they gain access to MEAC’s resources, they might have the impetus to donate.”

Collette is planning on pursuing film after high school. She has applied to a film production camp at Northwestern University, which, along with the University of Southern California, is her top school. Collette “finds passion in things coming to life, especially on screen . . . when you can actually see it happening, when you can tell a story, when you can see it and see someone’s real, raw emotions, I just feel so much more of a connection…though I do love reading, there’s something about film coming to life that I’m in awe of.” A video that Collette produced for MEAC: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B-UM8RWvX7D2TkpBaW1qNGNqMXM/edit

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Jan. 15, 2015

IMG_0382

Visit with Cincinnati Poet

Cincinnati poet Charles Gabel read and discussed his writing process with Eric Schweikher’s creative writing class shortly after the winter break. Upper School students enjoyed hearing Gabel read his work and engaged in discussion about poetry structure. Schweikher noted that Gabel sometimes includes his name “Charles Gabel” in his poetry, sparking discussion about the role of the poet in his or her written work. Gabel, a Cincinnati native, earned an MFA in Poetry from Boise State University. He is the author of the chapbook Pastoral (Strange Machine 2011). Some of his recent poems can be found in Alice Blue Review and Timber. Gabel teaches at Xavier University and works at the Cincinnati Public Library.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0240Studying Steinbeck

In a completely student-led project, Nate Gleiner’s English students studied works of John Steinbeck through their own artistic lenses in early January. Using Steinbeck’s memoir of Americana Travels with Charley as a focus, students designed unique class presentations, which were recorded and discussed by their classmates and Gleiner. Not two presentations were alike. One student presented her thoughts on Travels with Charley as a movie scene adaptation and another student compiled a photo essay. Other assignments included a travel journal, a map of Steinbeck’s travels, a collage of scenes, a comparison to Cincinnati, and a two-student team who captured aerial and ground level images of Cincinnati.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_7866

Bethany House

As part of an ongoing partnership initiated through math department chair Anne Ramsay, science teacher Linda Ford, history teacher Jen Faber, and three of Ford’s advisees, Alex Jiang, Audrey Ditty, and Kathy Wang, visited Bethany House on Jan.10 to spread new year cheer to moms and their children. Ford and her students served breakfast to families and played with the children. Ford said her seven other advisees who could not attend prepared delicious meals for the event. Bethany House is a local agency that provides service to disadvantaged women and their children.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Model UN

Good luck to students and history department chair Brian Wabler who are preparing to participate in the annual Model UN Conference on Jan. 30 at Earlham College in Richmond, IN. The students participating are: Connor Barton, Adam Buford, Grace Cawdrey, Alayna Choo, Sam Chun, Avery Coombe, Max Even, Claudia Fernandez, Chase Gardner, Sean Gray, Anjali Gupta, Srishti Kapur, Trey Kieser, Kenyon Moriarity, Devi Namboodiri, Nia Page, Mehul Patel, Mekhala Rao, Maddie Samson, Daniel Sauers, Andrei Savu, Bennett Smith, Nicole Tiao, and Bailey Wharton.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mock Trial

Good luck to students and history teacher Jen Faber, as they prepare for Mock Trial on Jan. 30 in downtown Cincinnati. The following students will participate: Michael Barresi, Nicole Barresi, Adam Buford, Carl Compton, Tindar Cyr, Elliot Glum, Sean Gray, Daniel Grass, Jason Guo, Charlie Karamanoukian, George Karamanoukian, Pearce Kieser, Jack Lane, Joanne Li, Claire McDonald, Nia Page, Mehul Patel, Bennett Smith, Chris Shoemaker, Mollie Rouan, Mekhala Rao, Devi Namboodiri, Mike Nazzaro, Claire Piorkowski, Hayley Samson, Daniel Sauers, Claire Stewart, Curtis Sun, Vaibhav Vagal, and Yuou Wang.

_____________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Dec. 19, 2014

IMG_1508Student Diversity Leadership Conference

Eight Upper School students and six faculty members attended the Student Diversity Leadership Conference (SDLC) and the National Association of Independent School’s People of Color Conference (POCC), respectively, from December 4 through December 6 in Indianapolis, IN. Faculty enjoyed a range of workshops and dynamic speakers, including hearing from bestselling author Michael Eric Dyson, comedian, activist, and actress Maysoon Zayid, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas. Students participated in intensive leadership training centered around community-building, diversity, and inclusion; they described SDLC as “enlightening,” “thought-provoking,” “challenging,” “eye-opening,” and “revealing.” The group returned to Seven Hills bonded by their shared experience and committed to helping others share their vision of a more just and inclusive world. Faculty attendees at POCC included Unit III teacher Regina Daily, pre-kindergarten teacher Rose Truong, Middle School world language teacher Jacky Kalubi, Middle and Upper School library associate Gail Bloom, math teacher Anne Ramsay, and Upper School English teacher Nate Gleiner. Participants in the SDLC pincluded sophomores Chase Gardner, Matisse Peppet, Jake Moses, and Quinn Shim; and juniors Cathy Fang, Sophia Pardo, Claire Stewart, and Jai Williams.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Libby Gerhart w_Bryden Goings and Connor BarnhartPersonal Challenge

The first half of Personal Challenge recently concluded in the halls and classrooms of the Upper School in November. Seniors and some juniors showcased their yearlong efforts with pride as the school community took in all of their hard work. Personal Challenge is a graduation requirement unique to Seven Hills. The purpose of the intensive project is to present students with opportunities to explore their passions with a strong sense of their individualities. The second half of this program will take place in April 2015. Click here to view photos from the event.

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0971Teaching Second Graders in Upper School

As part of their unit on winter holidays throughout the world, second graders teamed up with Teresa Bardon and Ismael Godoy’s junior and senior Spanish students to learn more about Las Posadas, a religious holiday celebrated in Mexican culture. The students reviewed vocabulary words, with the Upper School students and completed an art project that incorporated Las Posadas and the Nativity. Both younger and older students enjoyed the opportunity to learn from each other in Bardon’s classroom. “The project is part of an extensive study of winter holidays throughout the world,” said second grade teacher Danielle Necessary. “Students complete many activities including reading books and articles, participating in Readers’ Theater mini plays, and completing an informative brochure about the winter holiday of their choice.” Students also practiced their winter holidays production in music and drama, created winter holiday projects in art, and used a word processing program in computer class to create a document about their Chinese zodiac sign.

DSC_0985

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0859Diffusion Lab

Biology students used dialysis membrane to simulate a cell membrane in science teacher Bridget Ancalmo’s class. The focus of the lab work involved observing how water moves to create equilibrium when molecules are too large to move across a membrane. They tested their observation of osmosis by looking at the mass of their “cells” before and after sitting in different concentrations of sucrose solutions. They also saw how smaller molecules like glucose and iodine could diffuse across the dialysis tubing membrane, while the larger starch molecule could not. Students tested this by using indicators that change color when in contact with glucose or starch. Ancalmo said students were able to track the process of diffusion because they saw glucose move out of the dialysis tubing.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0841Measuring Launch Speed

Students in Lenore Horner’s AP physics class used ballistic pendulums to measure launch speed. “The students launched a ball into a catcher and then measured how high up the catcher swung in order to calculate the launch speed of the ball,” said Horner. “Before we had things like photo gates, this is one way in which launch speeds could be measured.” Ballistic pendulums are the original devices used to calculate velocity and kinetic energy.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Nov. 25, 2014

louder

Poetry Slam

Ten juniors and seniors will participate in the Chicago-born youth poetry slam competition, Louder than a Bomb. English teacher Erich Schweikher said this year Cincinnati will be the second city in the nation to host such an event and Seven Hills is the only independent school in the competition. “Louder than a Bomb provides a wonderful platform that not only gives the youth a voice, but also gives them a chance to share their stories in an encouraging and collaborative environment,” said Scwheikher. “Yes, it is a competition with various events and stages, but at its core, it is about expressing individuality and creating community through the writing and performing of poetry.” The Seven Hills competition team is composed of juniors Maria Bobbit Chertock and Holly O’Neal; and seniors Grace Cawdery, Claudia Fernandez, Joanne Li, Ellen Lu, Sophia Pardo, Mitch Polonsky, Chris Shoemaker, and Clarke Waskowitz. In addition to the exciting event, said Schweikher, Seven Hills will host an open mic at the Donovan Arts Center Black Box Theater on December 4 at 6 p.m. All participating schools have been invited. A few of the Seven Hills team members will participate in that, as well.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

back row from l to r: Cathy Fang, Barret Gao, Devi Namboordi, Mary Grace Ramsay, Curtis Sun, Michael Barresi, Michael Heldman front row: Andrei Savu, James Coyle, Tigar Cyr, Alex Jiang, Palmer Kruzner
back row from l to r: Cathy Fang, Barret Gao, Devi Namboordi, Mary Grace Ramsay, Curtis Sun, Michael Barresi, Michael Heldman
front row: Andrei Savu, James Coyle, Tigar Cyr, Alex Jiang, Palmer Kruzner

Rose-Hulman Math Competition

Thirteen students represented Seven Hills on Nov. 8 in the Rose-Hulman Math Competition, run by the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Indiana at Lakota West High School. Math department chair Anne Ramsay said students won individual ribbons for placing in the top ten in their respective divisions, with a total of 177 students participating locally. Individual students from Seven Hills earning ribbons for placing in the top ten in their respective divisions are listed below. Ramsay said some of the students placed in the following areas:

Ninth grade girls

3rd place – Mary Grace Ramsay

6th place – Yuou Wang

 

Ninth grade boys –

8th place – Michael Barresi

10th place – Curtis Sun

10th grade girls

4th place – Devi Namboordiri

10th grade boys

7th place – Barret Gao

 

11th grade boys

7th place – Alex Jiang

9th place – Andrei Savu

10th place – Tigar Cyr

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_3342

Science Lab with Pennies

Students in Jennifer Torline’s chemistry class incorporated scientific inquiry and research to arrive at a number of findings regarding the true worth of pennies minted pre-1982 versus post-1982. Students found that hydrochloric acid reacted with the zinc core of the penny, leaving just the outside copper plating. Students calculated that post-1982 pennies contained approximately 3 percent copper. “The students found that the cost of a pre-1982 penny, which is 100-percent copper, is currently worth more than $.02 for the copper value alone, and the post-1982 penny’s worth was about $0.006 each. Students learned that the switch to using less copper saves the government approximately $28,000 per day. To conclude our lab, students watched short clips discussing the pros and cons of eliminating the penny altogether from the economy, which led to lively class discussions.”

IMG_3346

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mekhala Rao
Mekhala Rao

Junior one of three finalists for $185,000 Medical School Scholarship

The National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists this fall announced that junior Mekhala Rao is one of three semi-finalists for the $185,000 National Academy Medical School Scholarship Challenge. Rao is one of 3,100 honors high school students who applied for the scholarship by identifying an unsolved medical or scientific world health problem and creating an original investigation of her design to solve the problem. Only Rao and two students, from New Jersey and South Dakota, were selected for consideration. Rao’s medical query topic was entitled “Using the plant Echinacea to treat the bacteria CA-MRSA.” Rao will present her research proposals on stage at the November Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Washington, DC. The Academy will award one full medical school scholarship covering tuition fees to a U.S.-based medical school (up to $185,000) to one student. In addition, two $10,000 medical school scholarships will be awarded to the runner-up finalists. Scholars attending the November Congress will vote to determine the winners. The students’ investigations included a hypothesis or thesis for which they developed a research or other game plan to tackle and solve the medical problem they chose.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Nov. 13, 2014

IMG_1345

Letters of Thanks

 

An idea ignited by a sophomore and senior at a recent Anthony Munoz leadership conference set off sparks of positive action, communication, and gratitude throughout the Hillsdale Campus. Sophomore Charlie Goldsmith and senior Fatima Anwar attended the leadership conference during fall break. As part of their participation, the two students were charged with the responsibility to coordinate an activity that would have an impact on a community. Goldsmith and Anwar decided to work with the Seven Hills community. “They came up with the idea to work with Lower School students on a letter writing project of thanks,” said Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis, who attended the conference with the two students. “They had 30 minutes to come up with the idea and plan it out.” The result was powerful. The entire 10th grade class participated in the activity, which took place on Nov. 10, 11, and 12 in grades pre-kindergarten through fifth. The sophomores, accompanied by 10th grade English teacher Tricia Hoar, met students in their Lower School classrooms, where they brainstormed and talked through the ideas with their young friends. Some students wrote letters to public servicemen and women for their leadership and service in the community. Other students wrote letters of thanks to a number of Seven Hills faculty members.

IMG_1334____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0405

Facts and Fables about Keystone Species

In a uniquely collaborative lesson, Linda Ford’s Upper School environmental science students paired up with Natalie Williams’ first grade science students for presentations of original fables about keystone species. The pairing was a blend of academics and storytelling that both groups thoroughly enjoyed. The environmental science students wrote fables about keystone species and read the stories to the first-graders. The first graders are familiar with keystone species – animals that have disproportionate affects on the environment – because they are studying it in science class with Williams.

DSC_0403

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Fracking Debate

On Oct. 30, the Upper School hosted two guest speakers, State Representatives Peter Stautberg (R) and Denise Driehaus (D), who debated the issue of hydraulic fracking. “Students in the journalism course moderated the debate and asked the representatives questions that had been generated by the whole student body in advance of the visit,” said Head of Upper School Matt Bolton. “The debate, which was attended by the entire Upper School, helped to raise our students’ awareness of larger political, economic, and environmental issues, and of the role that our students will eventually play in such issues as voters and citizens.” Organized by Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis, the debate was part of an ongoing speaker series that seeks to connect students to experiences, opportunities, and issues beyond the classroom.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0433Day of the Dead – Nov. 1 and 2.

As part of a cultural lesson in Jacky Kalubi’s Spanish 1A class, students studied El Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) and constructed a colorful model display of the shrines that are often created in honor of deceased loved ones. Kalubi and some of the students displayed pictures in memory of their family members. Students also included fruit and candles in the display. The Mexican celebration is a day to remember and prepare special foods in honor of those who have departed. Kalubi said students appreciate the multicultural lesson because it gives them an opportunity to quietly share memories and stories about loved ones who have passed away.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

20141106_134527Community Service in Action

Upper School students who have helped manage a project for the local non-profit Crayons to Computers involving giving school supplies to schools in need fulfilled their goals during the week of Nov. 10. Eight students have worked with Director of Experiential Nick Francis for several weeks to bring the project to fruition. Francis said the students enjoyed working directly with the students of the recipient schools during the distribution. Students managed receipts and dropped off a total of 100 boxes at several elementary schools, including Carson, Covedale, Rees E. Price, Roberts Paideia, Frederick Douglass, and Bond Hill Academy. The students who participated in the recent distribution are: Samantha Eng, Louann Kovach, Sydney Jones, Margaret Cox, Matthew Marquardt, Claire Stewart, Nicole Tiao, and Fatima Anwar. Founded in 1997, Crayons to Computers operates a free store for teachers from nearly 600 greater Cincinnati area schools in 16 counties (in Ohio, Northern Kentucky, and Indiana). The organization is led by Seven Hills parent Susan Frankel.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Oct. 31, 2014

safe_image

Seven Hills in the News

In a socially conscious exercise to raise awareness of the plight of homeless communities in southwestern Ohio, 25 Upper School students spent the night outside in cardboard boxes. The annual project, entitled “Shantytown,” took place on Oct. 23 on the Hillsdale campus. Upper School English teacher and project advisor Tricia Hoar said students ate a basic meal after school and prepared their bedding large cardboard boxes. That evening, students listened to a speaker from the Homeless Coalition of Cincinnati, discussed an ethical case study, watched a documentary, and finished homework in their boxes. Students slept overnight in their boxes on campus and woke up to attend classes the next day. “This project helps students to begin to learn about homelessness and poverty, two issues that are easy to turn a blind eye to in our daily lives,” said Hoar. “They learn that many of the preconceived notions we have regarding people who experience homelessness are simply inaccurate. Besides eating very little, trying to get sleep in a box, and waking up to go to a full day of classes tired and hungry, students learn the most directly from people who are currently experiencing homelessness.” Seven Hills launched Shantytown four years ago, after participating in the Mayerson Foundation’s Service Learning Program. The project runs in conjunction with the city-wide Shantytown event sponsored by the Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition, the Mayerson Service Learning Program, and Faces without Places. Click here to read the WLWT news story about Seven Hills Shantytown.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

-3Certamen

Upper School students participated at the first Certamen event of the season in early October, at Summit Country Day. Middle and Upper Latin teacher Dr. Brian Sebastian said all teams competed very well in a number of levels. The Level 2 team of ninth graders Jonathan Harsh, Lena Bauer, and Charlie Dwight made the finals and finished first. The Upper Level team of sophomores Matisse Peppet and Devi Namboodiri joined forces with two students from Indian Hill, made the finals, and finished first, as well.

-2

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0232Students Participate in Community Tree Planting

As part of a community-wide effort, Seven Hills Upper School students planted 30 trees at different locations throughout the Madisonville area on Oct. 24. Seven Hills Upper School science teacher Linda Ford said her environmental science students, along with students from The Children’s Home, planted 10 trees at John P. Parker Elementary and 20 trees in residential areas throughout Madisonville. The students efforts are part of a long-term, collective regional project to plant two million trees by 2020 for the reforestation of Greater Cincinnati.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0229

A Firsthand Lesson on Apartheid

Students in Upper School English teacher Marielle Newton’s class came face-to-face, via Skype, with someone who fought apartheid in South Africa. Bruce Alan Johnson, also Newton’s father, shared poignant stories about his life’s work as an intelligence worker, political consultant, and UN trainer during the time of apartheid, a system of racial segregation in South Africa. Newton incorporated the Skype session to further illustrate her students’ unit on South African literature that focuses on Apartheid, such as works by Alan Paton. Johnson explained several examples of his run-ins with apartheid, including being separated from black South African dignitaries during a dinner meeting. Among his many incredible achievements and international endeavors, Johnson undertook a three-month safari across Africa in 1977-78, meeting with African heads of state to negotiate their support of the US position at an upcoming world UN conference in Geneva. He also rescued a boat of kidnapped children off the coast of Kenya in 1978, served as special trainer for the UN in Nairobi in 1982, and taught entrepreneurialism to blacks, which was an illegal act during apartheid in 1978 to name a few. Johnson, currently an international consultant, has published more than 100 articles on Africa over a 30-year period.

_______________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0097Model Trebuchets

AP physics students built and tested trebuchets – the result of more than three weeks of drafting and designing in Lenore Horner’s class in mid-October. Students had to follow certain specs, such as using soda cans for weights, and soft squash balls for the object to be catapulted. Students found the machines difficult to build effectively because slings in the catapult tended to release the ball too late, but with a little perseverance and tweaking, several of the trebuchets worked. Horner said students were required to adhere to several constraints, including but not limited to the following when constructing their trebuchets: the top pivoting lever must be no longer than .91 meters; the counterweight must be four unopened 12 oz. soda cans; firing of the trebuchet will be performed by release of the projectile and/or its sling.

___________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Oct. 16, 2014

DSC_1218

Service Learning

Upper School students, along with Seven Hills’ Director of Experiential Learning Nick Francis announced a new partnership with Crayons to Computers. Over the past few weeks the students have used their lunchtime to manage a plan for distribution of 3,000 boxes of Yoobi school supplies accumulated through fund-raising efforts by Crayons to Computers. The project will reach hundreds of classrooms throughout Greater Cincinnati. Yoobi is an organization in coordination with Target Department Stores that makes one Yoobi school supply available to a school in need for every Yoobi school supply purchased. Founded in 1997, Crayons to Computers operates a free store for teachers from nearly 600 greater Cincinnati area schools in 16 counties (in Ohio, Northern Kentucky, and Indiana), offering new and gently used school supplies, educational tools, and incentive items.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

shane-digiovanna

Seven Hills Sophomore Named TEDx Speaker

Seven Hills sophomore Shane DiGiovanna was selected to be one of nine TEDx speakers at TEDxCincinnati. The highly-selective TEDxCincinnati Main Stage Event: “Vibrant Curiosity,” will take place in Memorial Hall on Oct. 16. Billed by TEDx as part of a “fantastic lineup of incredible people,” Shane will focus on his extensive scientific studies, namely, designing spacecraft that will explore the solar system. Along with Shane’s strong academic focus come medical complexities that affect him on a daily basis. Born with a rare skin condition called Epidermolysis Bullosa, Shane is also profoundly deaf, but hears with the aid of bilateral cochlear implants. In addition to his studies, Shane works diligently to help others with his skin condition by serving on an advisory board at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. TEDxCincinnati furthers the mission of TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) by giving a voice to ideas worth spreading throughout Greater Cincinnati and, with the help of social media outlets such as YouTube, the world. The October theme, “Vibrant Curiosity,” will share insights on health innovations, wellness, and biotech. Click here to view a recent WCPO article on Shane and his accomplishments. Tickets for the October TEDx event may be purchased here.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Roundtable Debates

On Sept. 23 and 24, students in Mrs. Driehaus’ Upper School history class participated in a collegiate-level debate entitled, “The Meaning of Equality Roundtable Discussion.” Students were assigned a historical figure and asked to convene at the fictitious Meaning of Equality Convention (MEC) in the year 1800 to debate the meaning and implications of the part of Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence that states, We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Students were required to write two short essays explaining why their historical figure has been asked to attend the MEC and what positions their figure might take on a number of issues. A second essay asked students to answer the question, “How ‘revolutionary’ was the American Revolution?” Click here to view a list of the historical figures Mrs. Driehaus’ students were assigned to represent during their roundtable discussion.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

-1What are YOU reading?

On Oct. 7, the Seven Hills Middle and Upper School Library department launched a “Currently Reading” selfie campaign for faculty. “This will help continue to establish a culture of reading among faculty and students,” said Middle and Upper School librarian Suzanne Dix. The first selfie to come in was History department chair Mr. Wabler’s Congo by David Van Reybrouck. A close second was a group selfie of Math department chair Mrs. Ramsey, and math teachers Mrs. Levesque and Mrs. VanderLaan, who are reading The Golem and the Jinni, by Helene Wecker, We are all Completely Beside Ourselves, by Karen Joy Fowler, and Mindset, by Carol S. Dweck, respectively. All Seven Hills teachers are welcome to participate by emailing a picture of themselves and book titles to either gail.bloom@7hills.org or Suzanne.dix@7hills.org. Once all selfies are collected on the campaign deadline of Oct. 17, Mrs. Dix and library assistant Mrs. Bloom will loop a Powerpoint of entries in the Young Family Library. The selfies also will be entered into a contest to win $20 to Blue Manatee or Joseph Beth bookstores, or Amazon.com. Stay tuned to see what books other Seven Hills teachers find fascinating.

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Maggie Kersting
Maggie Kersting

Camp Ernst Campers Honored

Congratulations to ninth graders Mary Grace Ramsey and Maggie Kersting, who were among two percent of the 3,000 campers to win the prestigious YMCA Camp Ernst Honor Camper Award. A tradition since 1928, Honor Camper was created by Camp Ernst founder Willard L. Wade to recognize campers with outstanding character and leadership. Camp Ernst’s staff of more than 100 nominate and vote on campers they believe display the YMCA core character values of honesty, caring, respect, and responsibility at the end of each weeklong session. After the counselor’s votes are tallied, the Honor Campers are publicly recognized during the week’s closing campfire. “These campers made our jobs so much easier,” counselor Lisa Zangari said. “We do not just want to recognize the fastest runner in the track meet or the best singer at the campfire, but also those who helped others and showed true leadership all week.”

Grace Ramsay
Mary Grace Ramsay

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Sept. 25, 2014

DSC_0885Collaborative Effort

Seven Hills’ English and history departments are working together to create a rich experience for ninth-grade students studying Ancient Greece. “The idea started because the English department was seeing students ask the same questions about the same parts in Homer’s Odyssey,” said history teacher Brian Wabler. “We discussed ways to collaborate and decided that it would be beneficial to both classes to have the history students put together a two-to-three minute video based on Ancient Greece.” Mr. Wabler said history students will learn about Ancient Greece about three weeks before English students begin reading the book. Students and teachers will discuss the most effective way to present the videos to English students, who will use them as resources in their study.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Merit Semifinalists Ben King, Andrew Wilson, Alayna Choo, Joanne Li, Mitchell Polonsky, Nicole Barresi, Carl Compton, Pearce Kieser, Adam Buford (not pictured - Grace Cawdrey and Lindsay Finn)
National Merit Semifinalists
Ben King, Andrew Wilson, Alayna Choo, Joanne Li, Mitchell Polonsky, Nicole Barresi, Carl Compton, Pearce Kieser, Adam Buford (not pictured – Grace Cawdrey and Lindsay Finn)

National Merit Scholars Announced

The Seven Hills School continues its tradition of excellence with 11 Seven Hills seniors who qualified as Semifinalists in the 2015 National Merit Scholarship Program. The Seven Hills School congratulates the following National Merit Semifinalists: Nicole Barresi, Adam Buford, Grace Cawdrey, Alayna Choo, Carl Compton, Lindsay Finn, Pearce Kieser, Ben King, Joanne Li, Mitchell Polonsky, and Andrew Wilson. The

Adam Buford
Adam Buford

National Achievement Scholarship Program

Seven Hills senior Adam Buford, also a National Merit Semifinalist, was named a Semifinalist in the National Achievement Scholarship competition today, Sept. 24. Adam is one of 1,600 African-American student applicants – about 1 percent of whom have been designated Semifinalists in the National Achievement Scholarship Program.

Adam will now have an opportunity to compete for approximately 800 Achievement Scholarship awards totaling about $2.5 million that will be offered next spring.

The National Achievement Scholarship Program, conducted by National Merit Scholarship Corporation, was initiated in 1964 to recognize African-American scholars throughout the nation and provide scholarships to a substantial number of the most oustanding program participants.

 

National Commended Scholars (front) Ellen Lu, Judy Sun, Ellie Pasquale, Avery Coombe, Grace Carroll (back) Arjun Dheenan, Alex Li, Sean Yoshitomi-Gray, Chris Janidlo, Chris Shoemaker, Duncan Gibson
National Commended Scholars
(front) Ellen Lu, Judy Sun, Ellie Pasquale, Avery Coombe, Grace Carroll
(back) Arjun Dheenan, Alex Li, Sean Yoshitomi-Gray, Chris Janidlo, Chris Shoemaker, Duncan Gibson

National Commended Scholars

11 Seven Hills seniors as Commended Students in the 2015 National Merit Program: Grace Carroll, Avery Coombe, Arjun Dheenan, Duncan Gibson, Christopher Janidlo, Alexander Li, Ellen Lu, Ellen Pasquale, Christopher Shoemaker, Judy Sun, and Sean Yoshitomo-Gray. To be considered for a Merit Scholarship award, semifinalists must fulfill several requirements to advance to the Finalist level of the competition. Semifinalists are the highest-scoring program entrants in each state and represent the top one percent of the state’s senior students. Students qualify for recognition in the National Merit programs with their scores on the PSAT/NMSQT®.

 

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

nacac-logo-1College Counseling Holds Mock Admissions Workshop

There are very few opportunities for students and their parents to experience what it is like to be on the other side of the desk in the world of college admission. Seven Hills’ college counseling department created that unique opportunity on Sept. 14 during the school’s first Mock Admissions Committee Workshop for seniors and their parents. During the event, more than 90 students – 230 parents and students total ­– worked in groups with representatives from 26 visiting colleges and universities from all over the country. Students played the roles of college admissions officers, discussing the applictations of fictional students applying to fictional colleges, said Seven Hills college counselor Miss Magdzinski. The groups placed the fictional students in the admitted, denied, or waitlisted categories. “The students really got into it,” said Miss Magdzinski. “The biggest complaint was that students wanted more time to discuss their choices. “The goal of the program was to demystify the college admissions process for students and parents, and I think it went a long way in doing just that,” said Miss Magdzinski. “By stepping into the shoes of admissions officers for an evening, participants walked away with a better understanding of the complexities and subjectivity of how, and why, admissions decisions are made.” Seven Hills hosts visits from more than 100 colleges and universities across the nation every year. For a list of the colleges and universities that visited The Seven Hills School for this event, please click here.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0750Sun Printing

Students in Upper School science teacher Mr. Berning’s class took their learning outside for a lesson in sun printing. Students placed leaves on paper treated with potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate. Once the paper is left in the sun for 10 to 20 minutes, the leaves, which block the UV rays of the sun, stay white, while the rest of the paper turns a rich blue. Negative or positive images can be obtained by blocking UV light from reaching the treated paper. The practice of sun printing is a popular activity used as a beautiful craft and study in UV rays, and is one of the oldest forms of negative printing.

DSC_0752

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0756 2Presentations in Spanish

Spanish 4 students in Mrs. Bardon’s class gave PowerPoint presentations, entirely in Spanish, about a Spanish-speaking country. Seven Hills students began learning Spanish in pre-kindergarten and have the opportunity to take classes up to Spanish 5 in the Upper School. Mrs. Bardon said most students who start in the Lower School grades and continue through consistently have the opportunity to become fluent in Spanish by the time the graduate.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Sept. 11, 2014

DSCN2483Ninth Grade Retreat

Ninth-graders spent 24 hours together at a retreat especially designed to help smooth the transitions from Middle to Upper School. The multi-faceted experience allowed them to make new friends, get to know their teachers, and spend time together in a setting other than the classroom – all important components of the early ninth-grade experience. The freshmen class had a fun-filled 24 hours at Camp Ernst in Burlington, KY. Through activities and exercises with their peers, teachers, and administrators, they bonded as a class and gathered clearer expectations about Upper School. The activities not only strengthened their orientation process, but set foundations for important relationships throughout their Upper School careers. Click here to view photos from the retreat.

DSCN2491

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

collegeUpper School Achievements

Of the 101 students who took AP exams in May, 94% earned a score of 3 or higher, generally considered the college-credit-granting criterion. In addition, 55% of them received national AP recognition for their outstanding performance. For more information, click here to view the 2014-15 School Profile.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Summer Accomplishments

Upper School students participated in a number of amazing opportunities over the summer. This list is not exhaustive of all of our students’ summer opportunities, but reflects the list available to the college counseling department at the time of the report. The college counseling department shares the following report.

  • Alex Li participated in an engineering program at Purdue University.
  • Nicole Barresi participated in the Ann Power Vital Voices Leadership Forum.
  • Mollie Rouan attended summer programs at Brown University and Georgetown University.
  • Turner Anderson worked in Montana clearing trees to help prevent fire risk.
  • Avery Coombe worked as a camp counselor at Camp Joy.
  • Joanne Li worked at Breakthrough Cincinnati.
  • Jared Nelson and Jackson Callow worked at Seven Hills summer program.
  • Srishti Kapur attended a program at Brown University and participated in a research program at UC, which examined the use of ultrasound for targeted drug delivery into the pulmonary arteries.
  • Jeff Dedeker participated in several football camps.
  • Alayna Choo participated in a program at Washington University.
  • Maggie Gosiger attended lacrosse camps and tournaments.
  • Adam Buford participated in research with the local head of the Federal Reserve Bank, where he was invited to the Council of Youth for Federal Reserve Bank.
  • George Karamanoukian interned in United States Sen. Sherrod Brown’s office and volunteered for the David Pepper campaign for Attorney General.
  • Ben Chung spent two weeks in Peru learning Quechua.
  • Chris Janidlo attended a six-week music program at Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan.
  • Sydney Jones participated in an internship at WCPO News.
  • Matthew Sharpe worked at Montgomery Inn.
  • Andrew Wilson attended a program at the University of Chicago.
  • Chris Shoemaker interned at General Electric.
  • Tessa Weisenborn, Liza Randman, and Adam Heines worked as camp counselors.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0642AP Physics Lab Work

Students in Dr. Horner’s AP Physics class started off the school year not only sitting at their lab desks, but also hunching under them as they attached various springs to the tables and observed spring constants using weights and force sensors. “We’ve asked students to pull on the spring and hang masses on it and they are measuring how much it stretches and how much force they’re applying to the spring and they’re going to graph that and find the spring constant,” said Dr. Horner. “They will then determine whether it obeys the formula we teach them for springs.”

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

ALS ICE

Mr. Garten Completes Ice Bucket Challenge During Upper Assembly

With the more than 200 Upper School students and faculty looking on, Head of School Chris Garten made good on a challenge from Cincinnati Country Day School’s Head Rob McCrae to dump a bucket of ice water on his head to benefit the ALS. At the count of three, Mr. Garten received two large sports canisters full of ice water on the deck, poured by senior senators Chris Shoemaker and Daniel Sauers. “ALS is a very wasting disease and there aren’t enough funds for research,” said Mr. Garten, who also made a donation to the cause. Within two weeks, his posting had accumulated more than 4,000 views and 89 likes on Facebook.

[collapse id=”collapse_17″]
[citem title=”Click here to read stories from the 2013-14 school year” id=”citem_43″ parent=”collapse_17″]

Seven HIlls Class of 2014
Seven Hills Class of 2014

Commencement 2014

Generosity and Humanity. The Class of 2014 was often described with these words as 61 Seven Hills seniors were honored on the evening of June 6. To the tune of Jean Joseph Mouret’s “Rondeau” played by The Northwind Brass Quintet, the young men and women proceeded to their seats in the Kalnow gym to enjoy an elegant evening of shared wisdom, humor, and heartfelt farewells. Senior Senate members Emily Addy and Ellie Wilson began the evening with an address to the graduating class. They were then greeted by the President of the Board of Trustees Sarah Steinman and Head of School Chris Garten. The graduates also enjoyed a special tribute by history teacher and college readiness counselor Beth Driehaus. Parent speaker Philip Duncan, parent of Mason Duncan, and student-selected speaker Andrew Ligeralde shared memories with the class as well.

Keynote speaker David Falk, chef and owner of Cincinnati-based Boca, Sotto, and Nada, encouraged the students to be joyful in all that they do, to be generous with what they have, and to continue to learn. Speaking to an audience of hundreds of family members and friends, Mr. Falk also encouraged the graduates to thank their parents, perhaps by taking them to dinner. With that statement, he asked graduates to look under their chairs. The Seven Hills graduates were surprised and pleased to find gift certificates to one of Mr. Falk’s three restaurants. The ceremony concluded with an awards presentation ceremony, which included endowed awards, departmental awards, and the Alumni Association Service Award, presented by Alumni Association Board Chair Scott Carroll `85 to Samuel Ransohoff-Englert. Many thanks to Andi Guess, Kim Hogel, and the maintenance staff for organizing and setting up the event. Click here to view a photo gallery of the event.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Commencement Awards

 

Alumni Association Service Award

Sam Ransohoff-Englert – The Alumni Association Service Award is given to a senior who has an outstanding record of service to home and community.

 

 

Florence Fessenden Award

Brian Hu – The Florence Fessenden Award is given to a senior for outstanding achievement in a certain academic area.

 

Carol Brestel Award

Zach Abraham – The Carol Brestel Award is selected by vote of the faculty “to a senior who combines enthusiasm and talent and who exhibits leadership in school life.”

 

 

Ruth Russell Jones Award

Sammy Head – The Ruth Russell Jones Award is awarded to the senior who has exhibited the greatest overall improvement and intellectual growth over a three-year period.

 

 

The Seven Hills Cup

Andrew Ligeralde – The Seven Hills Cup is given to the eading scholar in the senior class.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Congratulations Graduates!

Congratulations to Seven Hills’ Class of 2014! Best wishes for continued success!

Zachary Mario Abraham

Emily Abigail Addy

Miguel Antonio Alemañy Natali

Roshni Yazdi Bagli

Hannah Bernice Berger

Christopher Chales Brenning

Blair Ayn Brinker

Kevin Andrew Cole

Nick Chapman Davis

Nils E. Dawson

Ashok V. Dheenan

Justin Lawrence Ditty

John E. Donnell

Mason Claire Duncan

Molly Jane Ellis

Samuel Max Ellis

Allie Lynn Feuerlein

Johnathan David Fisher

Devin James Garrett

Armand John Ghazi

Louis Robert Goldsmith

Hadiya Amira Jones Harrigan

Samantha Haydock Head

Kathryn Marie Hickenlooper

Thomas Gervase Hoffman III

Brian Menglei Hu

Kayla Nandini Kavanaugh

Anquing Angie Li

Andrew Christian de la Cruz Ligeralde

Alexis Gabrielle Lindsay

Caroline Jameson Linne

Eryn Ashley MacKenzie

Jeffrey Robert Boyce Maggio

Roderick McFarland

Kyle Ferney McKibben

Benjamin Wallace Murray

Lawrence Isabella Pieper

Matthew Peyer Postell

Alanna Brennan Quinlan

Samuel Joseph Ransohoff-Englert

Tess Elaine Renusch

Connor Wayne Rouan

Sarah Brady Salter

Micaela Therese Marie Sanders

Hayden Andrew Schiff

Jessica Taylor Seibold

Reena Anne SenGupta

Steven Haoyu Shi

Sarah Phyllis Rosati Shim

Hannah Caroline Silverman

Elizabeth Ellen Sizer

Panagiotis Skoufalos

Erik Smail

Benjamin David Sorscher

Kelsey Irene Stratman

Gregory Kai-Le Sun

Emma Evelyn Uible

Phoebe Sunwoo Um

Lauren Brittani Weems

Eleanor Shaw Wilson

Tessa Jordan Woodall

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Colleges and Universities our 2014 Graduates will Attend

 

Bates College

Case Western Reserve University

Clemson University

Columbia College Chicago

Cornell University

Earlham College

Elon University

Emory University

Harvard College

Indiana University

Kalamazoo College

Marquette University

Miami University

Northeastern University

Ohio University

Ohio Wesleyan University

Pratt Institute

Rice University

Roanoke College

Rochester Institute of Technology

Rochester Institute of Technology

Sewanee: The University of the South

Southern Methodist University

Syracuse University

The George Washington University

The Ohio State University

Tufts University

Tuskegee University

University of California/Berkeley

University of Chicago

University of Cincinnati

University of Denver

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of MichiganUniversity of Rochester

University of South Carolina

University of St. Andrews, Scotland

Vanderbilt University

Washington University in St. Louis

Xavier University

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Awards

Congratulations to all Seven Hills award recipients. The following departmental awards were presented at Awards Day at the Upper School:

 

Miriam Titcomb Award

Jeff Dedeker was presented the Miriam Titcomb Award, the highest honor awarded to a junior, for exhibiting excellence in “initiative in some area, originality in some area, love of fellow man, and courage of convictions.”

 

Clement L. Buenger Award

Lauren Weems was presented the Buenger award on behalf of the Fund for Independent Schools of Cincinnati (FISC) to a senior.

 

 

Neil Smith Scholarship – Presented to a student in grade 9, 10, or 11, who best exemplifies the qualities for which Neil Smith is known. He/she must “meet the world with optimism and good will, expect the best from themselves and others, and exhibit, courage, compassion, integrity, and intelligence.

Nicole Malofsky

Matthew Marquardt

 

Personal Achievement Award – Presented to the students whose contributions have made Seven Hills a better place.

Jake Moses (9)

Camille Williams (10)

Jackson Callow (11)

Kate Hickenlooper (12)

 

Sophomore Scholastic Achievement – This is awarded to the sophomore who exhibits a scholarly temperament and who has contributed the benefits of learning in a given discipline to the School and/or the wider community. This student exhibits a love of learning and intellectual curiosity, and shares enthusiasm for the discipline with others.

Ada Huang

 

Citizenship Award – This is awarded to the student who takes an active role in school and/or community affairs, and who exhibits mature political and global consciousness and a sense of civic responsibility.

Alayna Choo

 

Creativity and Original Thinking Award – This is awarded to the student who is given to independent thinking, and who has displayed an inquisitive and creative habit of mind.

Chris Janidlo

 

Junior Pearce Kieser was awarded the Community Scholar Award, presented to the student “who has shown exceptional achievement in a given discipline and who has extended that knowledge to benefit the larger community.”

 

Kathy Richardson Award – This is given to a freshman who has shown promise in writing, creative or analytical, and whose enthusiasms for the discipline of English has been exemplary.

Esther Kim

Matisse Peppet

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Departmental Awards

English Award

Mollie Rouan

 

Janet Fast Andress Art award

Sarah Salter

 

History Award

Roshni Bagli

 

Science Awards

The Science Department awarded the Physics Award to Sarah Shim, the Chemistry Award to Ellie Pasquale, and the Biology Award to Mac Bassett.

 

Mathematics Award

Gregory Sun

 

Foreign Language Awards

Foreign Language Awards were presented to Ellen Lu in French, Caroline Linne in Spanish, Nicole Tiao in Latin, and Hadiya Harrigan in Chinese.

 

Female Archie Griffin Sportsmanship Award

Kate Hickenlooper

 

Male Archie Griffin Sportsmanship Award

Devin Garrett

 

Courageous Student Award

Eryn MacKenzie

 

Elinor Scherr Mosher Award

Maggie Gosiger

 

MVC Sportsmanship & Integrity Award

Zach Abraham

 

Jim Wright Award

Tana Luckie

 

Student Senate Award

Art teacher Jason Knarr

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

weemsbrinkerhu copyClass Day

Upper School students enjoyed Seven Hills’ traditional Class Day, a celebration of the seniors’ last day at Upper, which is full of goodbyes, choral selections, games, accolades from peers, and a light-hearted announcement of the student-voted senior superlatives. Click here to view a picture gallery of the event.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Angie Li
Angie Li

National Merit Scholarship Winners

Congratulations to Gregory Sun, who received a scholarship to attend University of Chicago, and to Angie Li, who received a scholarship to attend Vanderbilt University.

Gregory Sun
Gregory Sun

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Greek Exam

Congratulations to freshman Matisse Peppet for her outstanding achievement on the National Greek Exam. Latin teacher Brian Sebastian said this is the first time a Seven Hills student has taken the exam. Matisse earned a blue ribbon for her score of 37/40 on the Beginning Attic Greek exam that she took this past March.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chemistry OlympiadChemistry Olympiad

Junior Pearce Kieser participated in the Chemistry Olympiad qualifying examination. Pearce did well enough to be invited to the second round of testing with nine other AP chemistry students from Greater Cincinnati. The second round was a full day (teacher, administrator, coach, or fellow student) event, which included a three-hour written examination and a laboratory component that required the students to design their own procedures to answer a scientific question. The third round of the Olympiad included four students who will go on to compete in the national team. No one from Cincinnati was invited to participate in the third round.

 

IMG_0709

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Academic Summer Education for Upper School Students

While formal education takes a break during the summer, some students will continue to participate in a number of structured educational experiences over the break. Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs shares the following report on what some of our Seven Hills Upper School students have in store for the summer:

 

Connor Barnhart – Ohio Business Week program at Ohio Dominican University: http://www.ohiobusinessweek.org/programinfo.html

 

Jules Barretta ­– Georgetown University Fundamentals of Business: Leadership in a Global Economy: http://scs.georgetown.edu/programs/108/summer-programs-for-high-school-students-fundamentals-of-business-leadership-in-a-global-economy

 

Mac Bassett ­– George Washington U: Photojournalism: Media in Focus: http://precollege.gwu.edu/photojournalism-media-focus, and

 

Grace Cawdrey – interning for WVXU as researcher for Cincinnati Edition: http://wvxu.org/programs/cincinnati-edition

 

Carl Compton ­– UC Men in Engineering & Applied Science camp http://ceas.uc.edu/future_students/Activities/Summer_Camps/men_in_engineeringandappliedsciencesummercamp.html

 

James Coyle – UC Men in Engineering & Applied Science camp http://ceas.uc.edu/future_students/Activities/Summer_Camps/men_in_engineeringandappliedsciencesummercamp.html

 

Bryden Goings – University of Miami filmmaking

 

Leo Fried – Summer courses at University of Michigan, including a course in Speech and an Introduction to Stock Market course. http://www.summerdiscovery.com/u-michigan/courses/enrichment-courses and

 

Lukas Geiger – Brown pre-college program: http://www.brown.edu/ce/pre-college/pre-college-courses.php

 

Brian Goertemoeller – University of Cincinnati Econ course: Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders: https://www.economicscenter.org/1167

 

Chas Gregory – Northwestern University bioethics course http://scs.northwestern.edu/program-areas/summer/high-school-programs/college-preparation-program/infocus-bioethics.php

 

Michael Heldman – Choate writing workshop http://www.choate.edu/summer/high-school-programs/writing-workshops/index.aspx

 

Pearce Keiser – Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program at Children’s Hospital http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/education/research/surf/default/

 

Ellie Pasquale – Emory University pre-med course entitled, Anatomy of Movement : Pre-Med Studies: The Anatomy of Movement

 

Mitch Polonsky – Northwestern University Cherubs program http://nhsi.northwestern.edu/theatrearts/theatre-art-program/

 

Bennett Smith – University of Cincinnati Econ course Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders: https://www.economicscenter.org/1167

 

Bailey Wharton – Volunteering at AWL – http://awl.cps-k12.org/

 

Sean Yoshoitomi-Gray – Northwestern University

Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine with the Shah Research Group http://shahlab.northwestern.edu/

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Seven Hills Network of African-American Parents

Students and families who are members and supporters of Seven Hills Network of African American Parents (SNAAP) honored Seven Hills students of African-American descent during an annual end-of-year SNAAP banquet on the afternoon of June 8. Seven Hills parent Rev. Jerome G. Weaver gave the invocation. Head of School Chris Garten applauded the students and their families for a year of dedication and purpose. Keynote speaker Cincinnati State Technical and Community College President Dr. O’dell Owens encouraged the families to give back to their communities and thanked the students for their academic excellence and ongoing positive efforts. The banquet also included a signature libation memorial ceremony, a ritual pouring of a liquid in memory of those who have passed away or could not be present. The libation ceremony was officiated by Seven Hills parent Jan-Michele Kearney. Many thanks to parents Erica Vaughn, Chantal Weaver, Nancy Bennett, and several other parents in the SNAAP committee for organizing the event.

 

The SNAAP honorees for 2013-2014 school year are as follows:

 

Rising sixth graders

Michael Fitzgerald

Summer Jones

Riyah Vaughn

 

Rising ninth graders

Micah Cummings

Jerron Gray

Carly Jones

Jordan Nared

Gracin Richardson

 

Graduates

Hadiya Harrigan

Alexis Lindsay

Roderick McFarland

Micaela Sanders

Lauren Weems

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz May 30, 2014

computer programMiami University Computer Programming Contest

Seven Hills fielded two teams in April at the Miami University High School Programming Contest. This competition, hosted by Miami’s College of Engineering and Computing, has been held annually since 1987, and features very challenging problems that are to be solved over a four-hour period. Each team is provided a single computer to code solutions in a programming language such as Python, Java, C++, C#, or Visual Basic. Computer programming teacher and faculty advisor Brian Arnold said about 25 teams competed this year from schools in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. “I’m proud of our teams and their ability to stay cool and focused during this tough competition,” said Mr. Arnold. “I hope to have all of them back again next year.”

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

LFord honor

Upper School Science Teacher Wins Award, Joins National Panel

Upper School science teacher Linda Ford recently received the Catalyst Award, a service award presented to a section member who has initiated a project to benefit the section or members of the chemical community. Mrs. Ford was recognized for bringing together the AP chemistry teachers in the Greater Cincinnati area to help facilitate the introduction of the new AP chemistry curriculum including its new inquiry-based laboratory program. She established The AP Chemistry Teacher Support Group in February 2013. This group meets regularly (including during the summer) in order to share innovative teaching activities and strategies that comply with the new curriculum published by the College Board and to practice the inquiry approach to laboratory instruction. In addition, Mrs. Ford will begin serving in June as one of eight high school teachers on the AP Chemistry Standard Setting Panel. Congratulations to Mrs. Ford!

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

AP Chem

Student Chemists Study Sickle Cell Anemia at Children’s Hospital

The AP Chemistry class visited the Hemoglobinopathy Laboratory of the Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital on May 20 to learn about the Institute’s significant work to identify and control sickle cell anemia in newborns. Their host was Dr. Donald Rucknagel. The photo shows juniors Carl Compton, Chris Shoemaker, and Ben King in front of the high performance liquid chromatograph. This instrument separates and identifies the molecular variants in a patient’s hemoglobin.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

psych class2Psychology Project

Psychology teacher Lisa Bradley has again opened doors for Upper School students to uncover a number of discoveries during their signature psychology projects. “Psychology is a science. I am not happy to merely talk about psychology in class, I want students to have the experience of applying psychological science,” said Ms. Bradley. “These days, you cannot walk into any business without seeing a request for customers to complete a survey on your receipt. As surveys become more common, it is my hope that learning how to write their own unbiased survey will continue to stimulate students’ critical thinking out in the real world.” Ms. Bradley also said students frequently question whether they are going to use the skills they learn in school in their real-world careers. The survey research project is a great example of how students can use their natural curiosity, along with some knowledge of psychology and math, to generate data that answers questions about the real world. Please take a moment to review students’ findings, which are posted in the hallway just off the Alumni Gallery in the Upper School building.

psych class1

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz April 24, 2014

Brian Hu demonstrates his mechanical human-powered generator.
Brian Hu demonstrates his mechanical human-powered generator.

Personal Challenge

 

One student created a model for a “digital wallet” that incorporates the carrier’s driver’s license. Another explored and honed underwater photography skills. Another explored veganism … reformed and restored the family barn …trained for and ran in the Cincinnati Flying Pig Marathon … swam across the 3.5-mile Glen Lake in Northern Michigan. And on, and on, and on. The second half of Personal Challenge concluded in late April. Seniors and some juniors showcased their yearlong efforts with pride as the School community showed appreciation and admiration for all of their hard work. Personal Challenge is a graduation requirement unique to Seven Hills. The purpose of the intensive project is to present students with opportunities to explore their passions with a strong sense of their individualities. Click here to view a photo gallery of the second installment of students’ 2013-2014 Personal Challenge.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

outside geography- ramsayOutdoor Geometry

In their introduction to trapezoids, ninth and 10th grade geometry students in Anne Ramsay’s class were given an area to measure for which they needed to draw a corresponding picture to scale. “Given the nice weather, we took this outside and used chalk and meter sticks,” said Mrs. Ramsay. “Unlike many typical textbook problems that simply provide length measures and ask students to determine the area, in this context students were instead asked to determine the base lengths and height of a trapezoid given a particular area.” Mrs. Ramsay said students discovered that this was a math problem with multiple correct answers, not just one!

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

beacon3College-Level Exposure in Anatomy and Physiology

In Early April, anatomy and physiology teacher Bridget Ancalmo took students to a surgical lab at Beacon Orthopaedics. During the field trip, students were instructed on the use of medical technology in spinal surgeries and the procedures for correcting spinal disorders using rods and screws. Dr. Chunduri demonstrated these procedures on a cadaver and the students were then permitted to practice the surgical procedures on the cadaver as well. The opportunity was made possible through the efforts of Trey Jurgens, marketing manager for Beacon; Jayne Walker, director of laboratories; (Todd and Pierre from Stryker (medical technology company); Operating Room technician Shawn Shea; and Physician’s Assistant Kate Muenzer for all of their help. A special thank you to (Seven Hills parent) Dr. Chunduri.

beacon2

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Environmental Science

On Earth Day, April 22, students in Linda Ford’s environmental science class presented a lesson on “the importance of forests” to Lotspeich first graders. After making murals of a healthy forest, the children planted a Kentucky Coffee Tree seed. Mrs. Ford said students may see their trees sprout as early as late May. They can then plant the tree in the fall.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

StraightA_217 (2)Anthony Munoz Award

In late April, Sarah Shim was honored at the Anthony Munoz Foundation Straight A awards ceremony. Sarah was one of 18 seniors in the tri-state area to win a $2,000 scholarship. During the ceremony, Sarah named Upper School Science teacher Linda Ford her “Most Influential Teacher.”

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

French National Contest Results

Congratulations to the students who participated in the 2013-2013 French National Contest. Teachers: Jacky Kalubi, Ann Griep, Wynne Curry

Level 01A

Rachel Michelman: State rank 7; National rank 12

George Eng: State rank 9; National rank 14

 

Level 1A

Alex Keines State rank: 5; National rank 6

Curtis Sun State rank: 7; National rank 8

 

Level 2

Rosie Kilcoyne – State rank 7; National rank 8

 

Level 3

Alex Jiang: State rank 1; National rank 1

Matthew Clayton: State rank 2: National rank 3

Kathleen Wang: State rank 4; National rank 5

Fatima Anwar: State rank 5; National rank 6

Matthew Marquardt: State rank 9; National rank 10

Evan Smithers: State rank 9; National rank 10

 

Level 4

Claudia Fernandez – State rank 2; National rank 5

 

The following all achieved state ranking

Ellen Lu – 5

Louise-Audrey Zenezini – 5

Madeleine Gold – 6

Christopher Janidlo – 7

Kaylan Young – 8

b – 9

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Spanish Exam Results

Congratulations to the students who participated in the 2013-2014 National Spanish Exam. Students scoring from 75th through the 84th percentiles received a Bronze Medal

Bronze Level 1

Katie Corbett

Natalie Lucas

Cathy Fang

Duncan Gibson

 

Bronze Level 2

Rebekah Jonas

Chase Byington

Jeff Welch

Ellie Wilson

 

Bronze Level 3

Marney Briggs

Stuart Edwards

Ryan Green

Sallie Hatfield

 

Students scoring between the 85th and 94th percentile received a silver medal:

Silver Level 1

Jacob Moses

 

Silver Level 2

Henry Marquardt

Kendal Weems

Lindsay Fisher

Kenneth Remaklus

Samantha Eng

Nina Fatuzzo

 

Silver Level 3

Brandi Bryson

Anna Davis

Andrei Savu

 

Silver Level 4

Stefan Antonsson

Holly O’Neal

 

Students scoring above the 95th percentile received a gold medal:

 

Gold Level 1

Esther Kim

 

Gold Level 2

Samantha Chun

*Claire Stewart (and second in the state)

 

Gold Level 3

Angie Li

Joanne Li

Kate Coley

Tziporah Serota

 

Gold Level 4

Adam Buford

*Ellie Pasquale (and third in the state)

*Alayna Choo (and first in the state)

 

*Claire and Ellie received $50, and Alayna received $100 for their state placement.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz April 24, 2014

 

Lifelong Cincinnati resident and Magnified Giving founder Roger Grien with Meredith Brown and Lara Magdzinski
Lifelong Cincinnati resident and Magnified Giving founder Roger Grein with Meredith Brown and Lara Magdzinski

Magnified Giving

 

The ninth grade is participating for the first time in a local program called Magnified Giving. Magnified Giving is a nonprofit organization designed to teach students about the power and importance of philanthropy. Participating school groups are given a grant of $1,000 to award to a local nonprofit of their choosing. “The process is not simple,” said Upper School English teacher Meredith Brown. “The ninth graders chose the type of organization they wanted the grant to benefit, and then a leadership team invited organizations to apply, read their grant applications, narrowed the field to a group of finalists, and visited the sites of the finalist organizations to learn more about the work they do. The class will soon vote to determine which organization will win our grant.” Mrs. Brown said the ninth grade is also looking at organizing a fundraiser or a supply drive to benefit the finalists to which we do not award our $1,000 grant. As an extension of our participation in Magnified Giving, the Upper School also welcomed Roger Grein as a speaker. Mr. Grein, a lifelong Cincinnati resident, has dedicated his life to philanthropy and to working with young adults. Magnified Giving arose from a program he founded and initially also funded. Mr. Grein shared with all of us the story of his remarkable life of perseverance, generosity, and gratitude. Many thanks to Mr. Grein for an inspiring presentation!

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Spanish Honor Society Inductees for 2014

Inductees (all 11th graders except Tessa Woodall, who is a senior):

Stefan Antonsson, Adam Buford, Alayna Choo, George Karamanoukian, Nicole Malofsky, Tessa Woodall, Ellen Pasquale, Simona Scheiber, and Clarke Waskowitz

“The Spanish Department at The Seven Hills School established a chapter with the Sociedad Honoraria Hispánica (Hispanic Honor Society) in October of 1990,” said Spanish teacher Ismael Godoy. “The purpose of the Chapter El desafío (The Challenge) is to bring together and honor those students who have shown profound interest and success in the study of Spanish culture and language.”

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

French Honor Society Inductees for 2014

Inductees (all are juniors except Louise-Audrey Zenezini who is in 10th, and Reena SenGupta and Phoebe Um, who are seniors):

Carl Compton, Claudia Fernandez, Reena SenGupta, Kaylan Young, Stuart Edwards, Ellen Lu, Tessa Weisenborn, Chris Janidlo, Srishti Kapur, Phoebe Um, and Louise-Audrey Zenezini

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Natl Latin Exam US

National Latin Exam

Upper and Middle School students claimed high scores in the National Latin Exam many took just before Spring Break. “Of the 64 students who took the exam, three had perfect scores (the 16th-18th perfect scores earned at 7H since 2003), 30 earned a gold/silver medal or ribbon, and 49 earned recognition of some kind,” said Latin teacher Brian Sebastian.

 

Latin II (9th grade) – 13 exams taken, 10 medals, all recognized:

Summa Cum Laude (Gold Medal):

Matisse Peppet (perfect score), Calvin Arbenz, Daniel Grass, Piper Spooner, Jack Lane, Chase Gardner, Scott Arnold, and Jacob Weinstein

Maxima Cum Laude (Silver Medal):

Devi Namboodiri and Shane DiGiovanna

Magna Cum Laude:

Abby Schneider, Noelle O’Neal, and Quinn Shim

Latin III (10th grade) – 10 students took, 5 medals, 8 recognized

Summa Cum Laude (Gold Medal):

Tigar Cyr, Ben Nordmeyer, Bennett Smith, and Clay Hausberger

Maxima Cum Laude (Silver Medal):

Nicole Tiao

Magna Cum Laude:

Sophia Pardo, Zach Sorscher, and Kelly Pan

Latin IV Poetry (11th grade) – 6 students took, 3 medals, 5 recognized

Maxima Cum Laude (Silver Medal):

Chas Gregory, Carl Compton, and Ben King

Magna Cum Laude:

Jeff Dedeker and Andrew Wilson

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Connor Rouan
Connor Rouan

Senior Receives Young Entrepreneur Award

Senior Connor Rouan recently received the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) Young Entrepreneur Foundation’s National Young Entrepreneur Award. Connor developed his successful home and lawn care business – Misty Services – at a young age and recently registered his business with the state of Ohio. The prestigious award is given to high school seniors who operate their own businesses and show continuing signs of entrepreneurship beginning at an early age. The award also includes a $1,000 scholarship for college next year. The NFIB Young Entrepreneur Foundation is nonprofit organization promoting the importance of small business and free enterprise to the nation’s youth.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz April 10, 2014

Sci OlyScience Olympiad

 

Two Upper School teams competed well in 23 events during the recent Regional Science Olympiad held at UC Blue Ash. The state is divided into eight regions. Students win medals for individual events and then teams score points based on how team-members did in all the events. Upper School mathematics and physics teacher Lenore Horner said some of the events are written tests; some are lab tests; some require students to build something in advance and then test it; and some are a combination of these things.

Seven Hills Students Placed in the Following Categories:

Sixth place in boomilever – Ellen Lu and Angie Li

Fifth place in chemistry lab – Ellie Pasquale and Joanne Li

Fifth place in technical problem solving ­– Pearce Kieser and Roshni Bagli

Fifth place in water quality – Judy Sun and Arjun Dheenan

Fourth place in compound machines – Ellen Lu

Fourth place in disease detectives – Kayla Kavanaugh and Nicole Malofsky

Fourth place in bungee drop – Zach Abraham

Fourth place in experimental design – Zach Abraham and Nicole Barresi

Second place in write it / do it – Ben Sorscher and Andrew Ligeralde

First place in designer genes – Sarah Shim and Arjun Dheenan

The Ohio Science Olympiad is an academic, interscholastic competition designed to increase student interest in science and to improve the quality of science education. Schools with top teams in regional events get to go on to compete at State Science Olympiad. The top teams from each state then go on to compete at the National Science Olympiad. A total of 23 teams competed the region. It has grown from just 23 teams competing in state competition in 1985 to 271 teams competing in seven regional tournaments in 2012. The program is sponsored by The Ohio State University, the Ohio Department of Education, and the Science Education Council of Ohio. Click here to learn more about Science Olympiad. http://ced.osu.edu/scioly/aboutscio.html and http://www.soinc.org/2014_div_c_events

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSCN2337Latin Convention – Upper School

Seven Hills eighth through 10th grade Latin students earned high marks at the recent Ohio Junior Classical League Convention in Columbus, Ohio, “This year, our students performed at a very high level, individually and collectively, perhaps better than any delegation we have ever sent,” said Seven Hills Latin teacher Brian Sebastian. “For the third time in the past five years, Seven Hills finished second in Academic Per Capita, which is the number of points earned divided by our 24 student participants.”

Latin Convention Upper School Participants:

Freshmen: Calvin Arbenz, Eliza Clark, Shane DiGiovanna, Chase Gardner, Daniel Grass, Jack Lane, Devi Namboodiri, Noelle O’Neal, Matisse Peppet, Abyy Scheider, Quinn Shim, Piper Spooner, and Jacob Weinstein.

Sophomores: Tigar Cyr, Clay Hausberger, Kelly Pan, Bennett Smith, Zach Sorscher, and Nicole Tiao

Freshman Abby Schneider earned her second consecutive Best-In-Show for her Dramatic Interpretation and was invited to perform her monologue in front of the last General Assembly. Freshman Matisse Peppet placed first in five different categories and second in two others. Peppet also earned Best-In-Show for her Latin recitation monologue. Sophomore Kelly Pan earned Best-In-Show for her tile mosaic of the Pont du Gard. Dr. Sebastian said Seven Hills students continue to maintain an outstanding show at this prestigious academic event. Matisse Peppet’s 82 total points place her second all time in school history. (She placed first in five different categories and second in two others, a dominant performance.) “If Matisse had been a school by herself, she would have finished 24th out of 30 schools in total points earned, single-handedly surpassing Anderson, Woodridge, Lakota East, Badin, Mt Notre Dame, and Moeller,” said Dr. Sebastian. In addition, nine of 19 Upper School students earned more than 20 points each; six of those scored more than 30, placing them among the top 35 individual results in school history. “It is not too much to claim that OJCL Convention has become the pinnacle of our Latin year, a cornerstone of our Latin program,” said Dr. Sebastian. “Our students’ accomplishments are helping to build a reputation of excellence in the Seven Hills Latin program, not just in Cincinnati, but throughout the state.”

________________________________________________________________________________________

Cum Laude recipients not pictured, Ben Sorscher
Cum Laude recipients
not pictured, Ben Sorscher

Congratulations to new members of Cum Laude Society

The Upper School honored its new inductees in the Seven Hills chapter of the Cum Laude Society, a national honor society that recognizes academic excellence, at the Cum Laude Dinner on April 9. New members are juniors Stefan Antonsson, Grace Cawdrey, Alayna Choo, Jeff Dedeker, Pearce Kieser, Ben King, and Ellie Pasquale; and seniors Zachary Abraham, Roshni Bagli, Hadiya Harrigan, Brian Hu, Ben Sorscher, and Phoebe Um. The event also honored the members who were inducted last year as juniors: Andrew Ligeralde and Gregory Sun. Head of School Chris Garten said, “Modeled after Phi Beta Kappa at the college level, the Cum Laude Society recognizes academic excellence in some of this country’s most prestigious high schools. Membership is strictly limited to schools with exemplary academic programs, and Seven Hills is one of just a handful in Ohio. Induction today means that these students are being recognized as among the best of the best in secondary education in the nation.” Cum Laude speaker Mary Lynne Boorn, mother of Pearce, quoted Harry Potter series author J.K. Rowling saying, “It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all – in which case, you fail by default.” Mrs. Boorn encouraged students to embrace and learn from their failings and focus on the importance of being resilient.

Cum Laude Committee Barbara Scarr, Tricia Hoar, Tina Kuhlman, Melissa Khoo, Wynne Curry, and Lowell Wenger
Cum Laude Committee
Barbara Scarr, Tricia Hoar, Tina Kuhlman, Melissa Khoo, Wynne Curry, and Lowell Wenger

________________________________________________________________________________________

Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs
Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs

Director of College Counseling Named to University Board

The Seven Hills School congratulates Director of College Counseling Susan Marrs for her recent appointment to the University of Michigan’s High School Counselor Advisory Board. The prestigious appointment was based on Mrs. Marrs’ “commitment to higher education and our appreciation for her critical role in the admissions process,” said William Kelly Cox, University of Michigan Associate Director of Admissions. Mrs. Marrs’ appointment will be effective, fall of 2014. She will join 14 high school counselors from Michigan and around the country to offer the university feedback on school policies, procedures, and recruitment activities. Mrs. Marrs, also the Assistant Head of School, continues to serve in several capacities at The Seven Hills School, including Director of Studies for grades 6 through 12. She has served on several esteemed boards, including The Princeton Review National College Counselor Advisory Board, and the Fiske Guide to College Counselors Advisory Group. Mrs. Marrs has been Director of College Counseling at Seven Hills for 32 years.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

soul food3Student African-American Awareness Group Gives to Charity

Students in Seven Hills’ AAA – African-American Awareness – raised more than $300 in the club’s annual Soul Food Bake Sale held at the end of February. Families pitched in by making delicious entrees, such as baked and fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, corn bread, and an assortment of other dishes that were sold for $7 a lunch in the School cafeteria. Sophomore Brandi Bryson said proceeds from the fundraiser would go to a local school or charity that serves students in underserved populations. Adviser of AAA is Upper School science teacher Tim Drew.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Ben Simpson `04
Ben Simpson `04

Alumnus Visits Upper School Engineering Classes

General Electric jet engine engineer Ben Simpson `04, came back to share his professional path with Doug Ford’s engineering class in March. Ben, who works at the local GE plant but often travels, shared that he is one of only 400 such engineers in the country who are constructing plans to build more fuel-efficient jet engines that will be used in the near future. Ben had everyone’s attention when he shared that “science has a purpose.” “I am designing the next generation of engines, which will be 15 percent more fuel efficient,” he said. “Science has a purpose. Even if you don’t go into a field of science, find something that you really enjoy doing because you may be doing it for the next 40 years of your life.” Ben also said he is very thankful for his biggest influences at Seven Hills – retired Science Department Chair David Abineri and Upper School Science Teacher Linda Ford.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz March 13, 2014

Hauck Award Winners Abigail Clark, Ellie Pasquale, Tygar Cyr, and Lindsay Finn (pictured separately, below)
Hauck Award Winners Abigail Clark, Ellie Pasquale, Tygar Cyr, and Lindsay Finn (pictured separately, below)

Hauck Award Winners

Congratulations to the winners of the 2014 Frederick Hauck Scholarship for Commitment and Achievement in the Fields of Mathematics and Science ­– sophomores Abby Clark and Tigar Cyr, and juniors Lindsay Finn and Ellie Pasquale. The Frederick Hauck Scholarships are made possible through the generosity of the Frederick A. Hauck Foundation. Dr. Hauck was a world-renowned nuclear scientist and philanthropist who established the scholarships at Seven Hills to recognize students who demonstrate outstanding achievement and commitment in math and/or science. Each winning student entering grades 9-12 will receive a one-year scholarship of $1,000 to be applied to his/her 2014-2015 tuition at Seven Hills.

Lindsay Finn
Lindsay Finn

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

presidential scholarStudent Receives U.S. Presidential Scholars Nomination

The Seven Hills School congratulates Brian Hu, for his U.S. Presidential Scholars Program nomination. Brian, also an AP Scholar with Distinction and National Merit Semi-Finalist, demonstrates exemplary academic and athletic character. Brian also received the 2013 Boys Varsity Track Miami Valley Conference Scholar Athlete award, as well as one of the 2013 Frederick Hauck Scholarships for Commitment and Achievement in the Fields of Mathematics and/or Science. He also was an all-school winner in the American Math Competition, and in 2012, Brian received a Maxima Cum Laude rating in the National Latin Exam Level 3 category. The U.S. Presidential Scholars Program was established in 1964, by executive order of the President, to recognize and honor some of the nation’s most distinguished graduating high school seniors. Each year, up to 141 students are named Presidential Scholars, one of the nation’s highest honors for high school students.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

100_0665Winter Care Packages

The junior and senior class agents gathered to assemble the traditional winter care packages to Seven Hills graduates who are now college freshman. These packages, sponsored by the Alumni Association, are sent every January to our most recent graduates to let them know we are thinking about them and wish them well at school.

100_0662

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tech OlympicsTech Olympics

Thirteen Upper School students in Brian Arnold’s computer programming class joined more than 500 students from 44 schools in the Cincinnati area to participate in the annual TechOlympics, produced by INTERalliance of Greater Cincinnati. The students were exposed to a number of outstanding growth and networking opportunities during the event. “Our students came away with a fresh perspective of the future opportunities that await them, and the importance of their role in being prepared for those opportunities,” said Mr. Arnold. “They finished the weekend exhausted yet motivated, and keen on attending next year’s TechOlympics.” The INTERalliance is a collaborative effort of Greater Cincinnati Regional businesses and educators, creating an environment that gives local young IT talent a compelling reason to stay in southwest Ohio both for college and their careers. Founding members include Procter & Gamble, the University of Cincinnati, and Atos Origin.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Feb. 20, 2014

NM-300x200

Six Seniors Named National Merit Finalists

Congratulations to our 2014 National Merit Finalists: Brian Hu, Angie Li, Andrew Ligeralde, Panos Skoufalos, Ben Sorscher, and Greg Sun. “We’re very proud of these exceptionally hard-working, highly-accomplished seniors,” said Seven Hills Assistant Head of School Susan Marrs. “Of the approximately 1.5 million students who take the PSAT in October of their junior year, only about one percent become National Merit Finalists.” The National Merit Scholarship Program honors talented U.S. high school students each year for academic excellence. Finalists are eligible to receive the National Achievement $2,500 scholarship and corporate-sponsored Achievement Scholarship awards. The selections process will begin in late February.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

mock trialMock Trial Advances to Regionals

Congratulations to the 30-student Mock Trial team, led by Upper School history teacher Jen Faber. Two teams advanced to regionals and the third team missed advancement by a small margin. The team also won an impressive five out of six trials. Regionals will be held on Feb. 21. A special thank you to Mock Trial’s legal advisors, attorneys Ken Patel, father of two Seven Hills graduates Kyle Patel `13 and Alyssa Patel `12; Pat Lane, father of freshman Jack and seventh-grader Max Lane; Kent Shoemaker, father of junior Chris Shoemaker; and Kelly McDow. “They give up their time every week to help our teams,” said Mrs. Faber. “We are very lucky to have them.” In its fifth year, the Mock Trial team has made it to regionals three times in a row, including this year.

Students received awards in the following categories:

Best Witness awards

Mekhala Rao

George Karamanoukian

Mollie Rouan

Mehul Patel

Adam Buford

Best Attorney awards

Brian Hu

Calvin Arbenz

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

model UNModel United Nations Club Places in Several Categories

The Model UN Club in the Upper School spent two days at the Model UN Conference at Earlham College in Richmond, IN. Senior Kayla Kavanaugh won the Most Engaged Delegate award for representing Jordan on the Security Council, and junior Srishti Kapur won Best Delegate, the top award available in each committee, for representing Japan on the UN High Commission on Refugees. The 15 students represented Japan, Jordan, Malawi, and Cuba. This marks Seven Hills’ fifth year of participation in Model UN, which usually draws about 200 students from schools in Indiana and Ohio.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Certamen

Seven Hills recently hosted its fourth annual Certamen in early February. Twelve schools participated, including McAuley, Mariemont, Wyoming, Walnut Hills, Ursuline, Summit, Indian Hill, Turpin, Sycamore, Lakota West, St Xavier, and Seven Hills. Seven Hills’ novice team of eighth graders Charlie Dwight, Lena Bauer, Nate Rising, and Michael Barresi won their division, and the intermediate team of ninth graders Matisse Peppet, Devi Namboodiri, Shane DiGiovanna, and Jacob Weinstein also made the finals and finished third.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Feb. 5, 2014

APCS_at_HarrisBroadcastComputer Science Students Visit Harris Broadcast

Students in Brian Arnold’s AP Computer Science Class recently enjoyed a unique opportunity to visit Harris Broadcast in Mason. The students were given a tour of the Mason facility, where equipment and software are developed for the transmission side of the business. Students were able to see engineers at work and view various labs where transmitters are developed and where signal processing, networking, routing, and transmission control equipment is developed and tested. They also enjoyed meeting hardware and software engineers who shared an inside look into their field. Harris Broadcast is the largest manufacturer of broadcast market solutions, covering management of media, playout, networking and transmission technology.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

From left to right: 9th graders Paige Hagerty, Shelby Davis, Piper Spooner, Eliza Clark
From left to right: 9th graders Paige Hagerty, Shelby Davis, Piper Spooner, Eliza Clark

Polar Plunge for a Cause

Seven Hills students and friends of freshman Shane DiGiovanna took a polar plunge for science research on New Year’s Day. Shane has a rare skin condition called Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB). Shane’s mother, Patsy DiGiovanna, said Shane’s friends participated in the plunge at their home to benefit the Epidermolysis Bullosa Medical Research foundation, which funds research for Shane’s rare and currently incurable condition. Funds from the event also go toward the EB Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Mrs. DiGiovanna said 50 jumpers and at least 75 spectators participated in the event.

Left to right: 9th graders Scott Arnold,Jack Lane, Shelby Davis, Eliza Clark, Daniel Grass, Paige Hagerty, Jacob Weinstein, Shane DiGiovanna
Left to right: 9th graders Scott Arnold,Jack Lane, Shelby Davis, Eliza Clark, Daniel Grass, Paige Hagerty, Jacob Weinstein, Shane DiGiovanna

___________________________________________________________________________________________

photo

Mu Alpha Theta

The Upper School has a standing room only math club. Students who enjoy math gather weekly during lunch as part of Mu Alpha Theta to explore different math topics. Senior club leaders Brian Hu and Gregory Sun typically present mini-lessons and engage fellow students in trying out different problems. During a recent session, the focus was on trigonometry and the unit circle, in preparation for the upcoming American Mathematics Competitions.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

certamen2Certamen – Xavier University

Several Latin students in grades 8-10 participated in the Xavier University Certamen on Jan. 11, the third such event this school year. Two Seven Hills teams made the finals. The eighth grade level one team of Charlie Dwight, Nate Rising, and Jonathan Harsh finished first, their second top finish this season. The ninth grade level two team of Shane DiGiovanna, Piper Spooner, and Matisse Peppet finished third. Seven Hills hosted the fourth and final Certamen event of the local season on Feb. 1. More results on that in the next issue of The Buzz.

certamen

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz Jan. 17, 2013

spineStudents Attend Orthopedic Surgeon Lecture

Upper School students recently attended an extensive lecture on the spine. The presentation by Beacon Orthopedics and Integra Spine covered several aspects of spinal injuries, medical options, and medical treatments made possible through the inventions of engineers. Anatomy and Physiology teacher Bridget Ancalmo invited orthopedic surgeon Dr. Jaideep Chunduri and engineer Joe Roshetsky to lecture on the way the engineering and medical fields work together to provide innovative options for medical patients. Ms. Ancalmo also invited Doug Ford’s engineering students to attend. “I thought it would be a great way for students to meet people working in these fields and to find out how they all fit together,” said Ms. Ancalmo. “Doug and I hoped to expose our students to real world experiences and to career paths in the fields of medicine and engineering.”

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Hadiya Harrigan
Hadiya Harrigan

Senior Wins National Award

Senior Hadiya Harrigan is one of only 35 students in the country to be named a winner of the 2014 National Center for Women & Information Technology National Award for Aspirations in Computing. Hadiya was noted for her computing-related aspirations, for her outstanding aptitude and interest in information technology/computing; solid leadership ability; and strong academic history. The NCWIT selected her from an applicant pool of more than 2,300 students. Click here to read more about Hadiya in a Cincinnati.com news article.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Tutoring Program Receives Recognition from State-funded Agency

The Upper School tutoring program at John P. Parker Elementary School received honorable mention from 4C for Children’s 2013 Champions for Children: The Next Generation Award. Seven Hills is mentioned in the 4C event invitation, in the event program listing, and on the agency website. The 4C agency is funded in part by the City of Cincinnati, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, and the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services. Congratulations to Senior Jessie Siebold, who started the program,to Senior Zach Abraham who helps out a great deal with the program, to the many teachers who support the efforts of the students, and to Glenn Shillinger, who provides transportation.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

jengaTeam Work During Advisory

During an advisory time in late fall, freshmen Scott Arnold and Lukas Geiger and sophomore Kevin Jarmusik worked together on a Jenga construction to see how tall they could build the structure. Mathematics Department Chair Anne Ramsay said the example highlights students worked on team building exercises during advisory.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Dec. 20, 2013

Upper School English teacher Erich Schweiker's poetry was published in the prestigious Hawai'i Pacific Review
Upper School English teacher Erich Schweiker’s poetry was published in the prestigious Hawai’i Pacific Review

Faculty Poets Receive Outstanding Recognition

Two faculty members have received wide recognition for their works of poetry. Writer-in-residence Dana Crum’s poem, “The Broken Hand of Husbandry,” will appear in Killens Review of Arts and Letters. Mr. Crum also has been reading at a number of venues, including the Art Academy. Upper School English teacher Erich Schweikher’s poem “Counterweight” was published in the Hawai’i Pacific Review. He also recently read at WordPlay with a number of well-known Cincinnati poets. Please click here to view some of Mr. Schweikher’s poetry in the Hawai’i Pacific Review.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Haiku Contest Winners

Middle and Upper School Librarian Suzanne Dix and Library Assistant Gail Bloom hosted a Haiku contest based on the dystopian Hunger Games book, Catching Fire. The contest was held in the Young Family Library. Several Middle and Upper School students won the writing contest:

They are:

Upper School:

Adam Buford

Brandi Bryson

Matthew Clayton

Madeleine Gold

Ellen Lu

Middle School:

Caroline Corbett

Molly Donovan

Brett Miller

Mary Grace Ramsay

Emma Rooney

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Nov. 26, 2013

Hadiya Harrigan made a soapbox car.
Hadiya Harrigan made a soapbox car.

 

Personal Challenge

One went vegetarian for a month. Another competed in a triathlon for the first time. Another jetted to New York City on a fashion buying mission. Built a working boxcar … learned Korean boxing … built a synthesizer from metal scraps … formed recreational clubs for children … honed chinese calligraphy skills to an impeccable art … and on, and on, and on. The first half of Personal Challenge recently concluded with a flourish in the halls and classrooms of the Upper School. Seniors and some juniors showcased their yearlong efforts with pride as the School community took in all of their hard work. Personal Challenge is a graduation requirement unique to Seven Hills. The purpose of the intensive project is to present students with opportunities to explore their passions with a strong sense of their individualities. Click here to view a gallery of Personal Challenge. The second half of this program will take place on April 9, 2014.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gratulatio! Students Claim Outstanding Showing at Certamen

Students in Mr. Sebastian’s Middle and Upper School Latin classes placed in the first local Certamen meet of the season at Summit. Certamen is similar to a quiz bowl for Latin students. A team from each of the three levels made the finals. Mr. Sebastian called Seven Hills’ participation in Certamen “Outstanding.” After the Certamen event, several of Seven Hills’ Latin students joined other students from peer schools to participate in the Make A Difference Day service activity, at which they helped clear brush and did other trail maintenance work at the California Woods Nature Preserve.

Certamen results:

Level 1 (grade 8): Charlie Dwight, Lena Bauer, Jonathan Harsh, Nate Rising–finished in second place.

Level 2 (grade 9): Noelle O’Neal, Piper Spooner, Matisse Peppet–finished in 3rd place.

Level 2 (grade 9): Jack Lane, Calvin Arbenz, Jacob Weinstein, Daniel Grass–finished in 5th place.

Upper Level (grade 10): Bennett Smith, Tigar Cyr, Clay Hausberger–finished in 2nd place.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Students Shine in Rose Hulman Competition

This year 202 students participated locally in the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology math competition in early November. Individual results were as follows (places given by grade and gender):

10th Grade girls

1st place – Cathy Fang

10th Grade boys

1st place – Tigar Cyr

7th place – Alex Jiang

8th place – Andrei Savu

12th Grade boys

4th place – Brian Hu

15th place – Gregory Sun

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Abigail Clark (right, foreground) waits to meet Thor actor Chris Hemsworth
Abigail Clark (right, foreground) waits to meet Thor actor Chris Hemsworth

Sophomore Scientist Enjoys Hollywood Edu-Venture.

Sophomore Abigail Clark received the red carpet treatment, literally, along with just nine other girls in the country, for winning a contest promoting the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) disciplines, designed by movie star Natalie Portman. Abby spent a week meeting women scientists, exploring the engineering side of Disney, learning more about the impact of agriculture on business and society, and made new friends. Click here to get the inside scoop on Abby’s exhilarating week in Hollywood, where she viewed a screening of Thor: The Dark World and met the full cast.

IMG_3098Senior to Receive Honda-OSU Math Medal Award

Brian Hu was selected to receive the Honda-OSU Partnership Math Medal Award for the class of 2014 from Seven Hills. Brian was selected based on his academic performance in mathematics through his junior year. Brian was recognized along with other area winners at a special breakfast ceremony in early November at GE Aviation in Cincinnati with a pewter math medal, a $100 gift certificate, and the opportunity to apply for a $3000 scholarship at the Ohio State University College of Engineering.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Nov. 7, 2013

Abby2

Sophomore Science Student Invited to Hollywood Screening

What do you have to do to be invited to a screening of Thor: The Dark World in Los Angeles, amongst Marvel Comics executives and moviestars like Natalie Portman? Ask sophomore Abigail Clark, a budding herpetologist who is currently in L.A. as part of a national video contest for girls interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math).

The contest, entitled “Dark World Ultimate Mentor Adventure,” ran from Sept. 30 through Oct. 20. The contest invited girls to be “the next Jane Foster,” the independent astrophysicist character Natalie plays in Thor. Only 10 girls were selected from across the country. Abigail was filmed with the other girls for a video short, which will be shown prior to the opening day screening of the movie.

“I’m excited,” said Abigail. “I know Natalie Portman is really big on supporting girls involved in STEM. I am really happy to be part of this.” On top of that, Abigail likes science fiction–an added bonus for an amazing educational experience. Click here to view a promo video featuring Abigail and other winners:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0187Reading Partners Program

Seven Hills students thrive on partnerships and community service. When some of the oldest students were offered an opportunity to read to the school’s youngest students, the response­–and beneficial outcome–was heartwarming. About 19 Upper School students have made a commitment to read to Pre-K students on the Lotspeich Campus during part of their open block. The reading sessions take place at 2 p.m., after naptime. The program is part of a literacy education initiative spearheaded by the Upper School Library.

DSC_0212“With the nature of our campus and having all of the grade levels here, I thought we had an amazing opportunity to link the oldest with the youngest students in a meaningful way,” said Middle and Upper School Library Assistant Mrs. Bloom. “We try to keep the same Upper School students with the same Pre-K students so they can build a relationship.”

Before the program began, Mrs. Bloom discussed with Upper School students why reading to the Pre-K students is important, what was expected from them as role models, and how to read aloud. Due to a wide response from Upper School students, Mrs. Bloom has set up weekly visits with alternative groups of Upper School students.

Some of the books the students have read aloud are: Down by the Station by Will Hillenbrand, Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes, Grumpy Bird by Jeremy Tankard, and many others.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

“Inquiry Science at its Best”

The Cincinnati Nature Center invited Mrs. Ford’s Environmental Science class to help research the effectiveness of the removal of non-native invasive plants, such as honeysuckle, over the last several years by examining the levels of biological diversity on different plots of land that were cleared of honeysuckle over differing periods of time. “They needed a small group of mature and focused students to seriously conduct these surveys,” said Mrs. Ford. “For my class, it is a wonderful opportunity to follow data acquisition protocols that will result in relevant data to address an important research question. This is inquiry science at its best and service learning all wrapped into one spectacular day.”

As an added bonus, the class also was invited to tour an algae wheel wastewater treatment facility that has been in operation for only two years. More to come on the Upper School students’ findings!

 

_______________________________________________________________________

From The Buzz, Sept. 25, 2013

 

Students to Observe Live Surgery

Five AP Bio students will have the opportunity to witness a live surgery at Christ Hospital on Oct. 29. From their classrooms, students will watch the surgery via live feed from their classroom. Once selected, they will be able to participate in a Q & A with the surgical team during and after the procedure. Biology Teacher Barbara Scarr said the selection process is scheduled to take place soon. The event, entitled “Live Surgery–Live Feed Broadcast for Tristate High School Students” is part of an educational program offered by Christ Hospital.

________________________________________________

Jules Baretta
Jules Baretta

Regional Youth Leadership

Jules Baretta, a current junior, is Seven Hills’ representative with the Regional Youth Leadership Program this year. Jules was recently published in the the non-profit organization’s newsletter, The Experience. The Regional Youth Leadership program is an arm of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. Only 45 students are selected to participate in this prestigious eight-month-long program each year.

_____________________________________________________________________

 

MayersonAttendees

Students Participate in Student Service Leadership Workshop at UC

Eight Upper School students, accompanied by Equity & Justice Coordinator Nate Gleiner, participated in the 16th Annual Mayerson Student Service Leadership Workshop at the University of Cincinnati in mid-September. Organized and presented by the Mayerson Foundation, the workshop offered nearly 550 students and teachers from around the tri-state the opportunity to meet like-minded individuals from high schools and colleges, attend three breakout sessions on a range of topics, and speak with representatives of over 90 non-profit organizations.

Senior Emily Addy said, “It was a meaningful experience because it allowed me to meet people who have the same desire to help others and similar interests in new ideas and new ways to explore community service.”? More information about the Mayerson Foundation and the Student Service Leadership Workshop may be found at mayersonfoundation.org.

Attendees from L to R: Kate Coley (10), Camille Williams (10), Carly Cohen (10), Reena SenGupta (12), Jeff Dedeker (11), Emily Addy (12), Grace Cawdrey (11), Ellie Pasquale (11)

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMG_3201

Club Fair

On Thursday, September 12, Student Senate organized the fourth annual Upper School Club Fair. Club leaders and representatives gathered in the Commons and provided students with information about the 39 diverse clubs available throughout the week, including Chess Club, Amnesty International, Vintage Gaming Club, Engineering Club, and Model United Nations.

_______________________________________________________________________

CrumClassVisit2

Students Work with Writer-in-Residence

On Thursday, September 12, Eva Jane Romaine Coombe Writer-in-Residence Dana Crum visited Nate Gleiner’s English 12 classes to share his expertise about narrative voice in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Mr. Crum provided background about this literary technique and assisted students in group discussions and application of this concept. Students will incorporate techniques of voice into their own writing as they work toward completing a brief memoir to conclude first quarter.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

SM & painting

Career Café

Sarah Margaret Gibson ’07 was the first speaker this year for the Career Café program on September 18. Sarah Margaret is a recent graduate of The Florence Academy of Art, of Florence Italy, and is returning there this fall to teach. The Academy is a traditional Atelier school in Florence, Italy. It is dedicated to training the realist painter through methodology created in the Renaissance and used throughout the 19th century.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

From The Buzz, Sept. 12, 2013

DSC_0064Seven Hills Upper School Head Nick Francis to Lead Innovative Program

In his September 3 message to the Seven Hills community, Chris Garten announced Nick Francis’ plans to step down as Head of Upper School to head up a new program at Seven Hills. Nick will serve as Director of Personal Development, heading up our new “real world learning” component, which is taking shape as a result of our recent Strategic Planning process.

Head of School Chris Garten said Nick “caught me by surprise” when he indicated he wanted the position. But “frankly, the decision was a no-brainer,” said Garten. “Nick has been intimately involved in the planning for this new program … He brings a deep knowledge of our community, close relationships with students and their families, and a strong passion for helping students. He finds experiences that will stimulate their interests and develop their special talents.”

The plan is to develop a series of experiences to engage students in sustained, interdisciplinary explorations of issues of global, national and local significance.

Said Francis, “It’s really about helping kids explore through their interests and passions beyond the walls of Seven Hills. My goal is to help every Upper School student identfiy their passion and pursue it.”

The new program will help to promote meaningful engagement beyond Seven Hills in myriad ways, including career exploration and internships, community involvement and service learning, leadership training and entrepreneurial opportunities.

“With his customary loyalty to this institution, Nick made this announcement early enough in the school year to provide ample time for Chris Garten and his team to conduct a thorough search for a strong new Upper School leader.”

Garten said the the School is in the process of preparing a nation-wide search plan designed to culminate in a final appointment by early February 2014.

_____________________________________________________________

IMG_1723

Seven Hills freshmen students enjoy Ninth-Grade Retreat at start of school

Ninth-graders spent 24 hours together at a retreat especially designed to help smooth the transitions from Middle to Upper School. The multi-faceted experience allowed them to make new friends, get to know their teachers, and spend time together in a setting other than the classroom – all important components of the early ninth-grade experience, said Upper School Head Nick Francis.

The Freshmen class had a fun-filled 24 hours at Camp Ernst in Burlington, KY. Through activities and exercises, they bonded as a class and gathered clearer expectations about Upper School. The activities not only strengthened their orientation process, but set foundations for important relationships throughout their Upper School careers.

“I saw many smiling faces during the activities,” said Upper School Dean of Students David Brott. “I always measure a good trip by how tired the kids are at the end; these kids were exhausted by the end of the day Friday.”

IMG_1673Francis said the trip was a great success because both teachers and students felt that this year’s retreat theme “Expectations for the Upper School” hit the mark.

“A big part of what we’re trying to convey to the students is that there will be different expectations this year. They will mature and it’s a little different in the Upper School. They will have to step up a bit, and we will be there to help them.”

IMG_1664

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

DSC_0084

The Making of Engineers

There is a reason why independent school students typically find themselves at the cusp of new waves of innovation and transformational learning; they often are the product of evolutionary trends that celebrate fresh discoveries and appreciate the science of research.

In many ways, this process helps to mold the sturdy, unflappable framework of an independent school education. Students and teachers create systems based on the needs of their learning communities, and build on that progress.

This process aptly explains why Seven Hills now has a brand-new engineering track.

“Three years ago, we noticed a sudden uptick in the numbers of students interested in engineering,” said Seven Hills Assistant Head Susan Marrs. “After years of having, maybe, five engineers in a class, suddenly 20 percent of the Seven Hills Class of 2011 were applying to engineering schools.”

And it wasn’t a fluke. The knowledge trend was following a more universal shift toward the engineering disciplines. Twenty-five percent of the Class of 2012 turned out to be engineers, as did 30 percent of the Class of 2013, said Marrs.

“In 2012 we began talking about how best to meet the needs and interests of what was obviously our growing population of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) enthusiasts and determined that a new course offering was needed, one that emphasized creative and critical thinking about math, science and technology and that made significant use of hands-on learning projects.

“The more we investigated, the more we realized the best thing to do would be to offer not one but two separate one-semester elective engineering classes, one of which requires a higher level of math,” said Marrs.

Fast-forward to new Seven Hills teacher Doug Ford’s Introduction to Engineering class, and the interest is evident. Ford has two classes of enthusiastic students who are using the course as a Launchpad for collegiate plans in engineering studies.

The juniors and seniors huddle around what seem to be throwaway scraps of materials; old plastic containers, a variety of small weights, and index cards. The assignment? Configure 20 index cards in such a way that they support a plastic bowl containing 6.52 Kg (about 14 pounds).

DSC_0087

The response? With steady hands, the students worked in groups of four to roll the cards into cylindrical shapes – some in one large bunch – others in spoke-like fashion, to craft a sturdy base substantive enough to support the weight.

But it wasn’t what they did as much as it was how they did it that interests Ford, a seasoned math, science, and physics teacher with a corporate background in research chemistry. In a 21st century world, success is measured by one’s ability to work collaboratively and effectively with colleagues from a spectrum of backgrounds, belief systems, and personalities.

Ford said students would work on a number of collaborative projects that will stir up group conflicts and require well-planned solutions. Each project will incorporate four threads of engagement – design, communication, sketching, and group dynamics.

DSC_0082

The new course incorporates a universal approach that is missing in most K-12 settings.

“Students are accustomed to handling one or two long-term projects throughout the school year. But to be able to tackle multiple projects in what may be a socially-complex group setting is very novel to most of us,” said Ford. “This class is very representative of what type of society we are moving toward. As our world gets smaller we all have to learn to work in groups, and communicating within that group is so important.”

_____________________________________________________________

IMG_3098National Merit Semifinalists (l to r) from left to right: Ben Sorscher, Andrew Ligeralde, Angie Li, Panos Skoufalos, Gregory Sun, and Brian Hu.

Six Students Named National Merit Semifinalists

Congratulations to six students who have been named National Merit Semifinalists. They are: Brian Hu, Angie Li, Andrew Ligeralde, Panos Skoufalos, Ben Sorscher, and Gregory Sun.

The National Merit Scholarship Program recognizes students who are among the highest scorers in the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT). In order to be considered for a National Merit® Scholarship, Semifinalists must advance to Finalist standing in the competition by meeting high academic standards, as well as a number of additional academic requirements.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________DSC_0058

It’s Library Contest Time!

Middle and Upper School Librarian Suzanne Dix and Library Assistant Gail Bloom are running a contest for all Upper School students to “follow the Library” on Schoology. The contest runs from Sept. 9 through 20. Five names will be randomly drawn to win $5 Starbucks gift cards. The Schoology access code for the library is C9MRN-MF6PN.

[/citem]

[/collapse]